House Coal 10kg bags £3.99 - 3 for the price of 2 = £2.66 each @ Wickes
174°Expired

House Coal 10kg bags £3.99 - 3 for the price of 2 = £2.66 each @ Wickes

23
Found 18th Jan 2016
A traditional British economy fuel

Supplied in a convenient 10kg bag

Washed, sized & screened

Not for use in smoke controlled zones (all packaging clearly marked)

Sourced from UK mines
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23 Comments
I've rated it hot just for the irony
This stuffs rubbish, the pieces are tiny and don't last long. If you have a grate they fall through the gaps.
Much better paying the extra pound, when this is not on offer - or even the extra £1.50 now and getting the yellow bag. Lasts a lot longer.
Not voted either way as I think the products awful but it is a deal.
It would be interesting to see how this coal compares to central heating on a cost per kWh basis. Seeing as for the price of one bag you could get about 20 kWh electricity or 80 kWh gas (albeit with a small loss in efficiency through the boiler) people must just choose coal for novelty?
Turns out coal has about 8 kWh of energy per kg, so one bag is perhaps comparable to gas on a cost to heat basis. Might depend how much heat you have to 'put' into the coal to release that energy.
Edited by: "Jizzmeister" 20th Jan 2016

That is so sad working out the kWh . You missed comparing it to oil central heating, how does it compare to that?

Jizzmeister

It would be interesting to see how this coal compares to central heating … It would be interesting to see how this coal compares to central heating on a cost per kWh basis. Seeing as for the price of one bag you could get about 20 kWh electricity or 80 kWh gas (albeit with a small loss in efficiency through the boiler) people must just choose coal for novelty?Turns out coal has about 8 kWh of energy per kg, so one bag is perhaps comparable to gas on a cost to heat basis. Might depend how much heat you have to 'put' into the coal to release that energy.


[quote=hutchir9]That is so sad working out the kWh . You missed comparing it to oil central heating, how does it compare to that?

Since you're berating the poster who made the effort and since you think you're so smart why don't YOU work it out......?
where is best price for the good coal does anyone know?

Just had a log burner fitted and I'm paying £3.99 in b&m for pretty decent smokeless.

By the way, regarding the cost argument happening on here - I get about 4 hours of good heat for around £1.50. But no one should get a log burner to save money.
To compare it though, Is like saying why buy filet steak when you can buy shin. And also it's a slight hedge against gas prices and or your boiler failing.
We have an open fire and burn this coal from Wickes as it is permanently on 3 for 2. It is more of a novelty than a reliable heating source for us. Although when fire is lit we generally turn ch off. It's not possible to compare burning coal with gas as stoves and burners are different to open fires and whatever calculations you try to make much of your heat goes up through the chimney or flue anyway rather than into the room.
I would not recommend burning coal on a log burner, logs are wood not coal....
Best place to buy coal is your local coal man, I used to pay £15 for a 50kg of ovaloid, £14 for coke.
TomF

I would not recommend burning coal on a log burner, logs are wood not … I would not recommend burning coal on a log burner, logs are wood not coal....Best place to buy coal is your local coal man, I used to pay £15 for a 50kg of ovaloid, £14 for coke.



Thanks, will try then. it's a multi fuel log burner. I've even burnt myself on it
suited72

I've even burnt myself on it


Yummy, nice and crispy, just how I like it.
suited72

Thanks, will try then. it's a multi fuel log burner. I've even burnt … Thanks, will try then. it's a multi fuel log burner. I've even burnt myself on it


You shouldn't use this dirty coal in a multi-fuel stove as there is a danger gases can build up, cause a flashback and maybe blow the doors off.
You need smokeless fuel. It can be bought from DIY, B&M, Aldi type places for about £3.99 a 10KG sack.
here you go, the last 3 entries in the table show the cost you are all after (research I did before having defra stove fitted last year)

confusedaboutenergy.co.uk/ind…its

dona3853

We have an open fire and burn this coal from Wickes as it is permanently … We have an open fire and burn this coal from Wickes as it is permanently on 3 for 2. It is more of a novelty than a reliable heating source for us. Although when fire is lit we generally turn ch off. It's not possible to compare burning coal with gas as stoves and burners are different to open fires and whatever calculations you try to make much of your heat goes up through the chimney or flue anyway rather than into the room.



Open fires = ouch, with little efficiency & sometimes negative efficiency, I'm hoping it's a temporary measure prior to getting a decent woodburning stove & running it efficiently!? (used to have an open fireplace, nice but like leaving all the windows open in winter.
dona3853

We have an open fire and burn this coal from Wickes as it is permanently … We have an open fire and burn this coal from Wickes as it is permanently on 3 for 2. It is more of a novelty than a reliable heating source for us. Although when fire is lit we generally turn ch off. It's not possible to compare burning coal with gas as stoves and burners are different to open fires and whatever calculations you try to make much of your heat goes up through the chimney or flue anyway rather than into the room.




..sounds like you are more savvy than most though with regards to your fireplace though, go talk to Navitron forum guy's if you need any advice re a partial DIY install if it's the big cost of alterations holding you back
For folk saying not to use coal in case it blows the doors off etc... oO confusion abounds there.

A woodstove may have multifuel status by having a suitable insert t switch between the 2.

However you should not burn wood & coal together it causes all sorts of reactions you don't want (a bit of kindling to get it going ok, passable, but not a "mix of logs & coal" that DOES cause nasty gassing & potential build up detrimental to your room, chimney, liner etc.

Then again so does burning a sooty fire, this is precisely why folk should get chimneys swept & inspected every season, based on previous burns, slumber / hard burns at high heat etc.

We tend to get about a pint pot of soot or less after a full season of daily use, ..fireplaces / woodburners are a "science" worth learning about for less hassle, better warmth & to keep you safe & your home insurance valid.

& this is why I will bang on about fire cement & bailey "blue" chimney rods, they help get to know your stove / chimney & keep it all in good order with less need to get the professionals in.
MR GUS

For folk saying not to use coal in case it blows the doors off etc... oO … For folk saying not to use coal in case it blows the doors off etc... oO confusion abounds there.A woodstove may have multifuel status by having a suitable insert t switch between the 2.However you should not burn wood & coal together it causes all sorts of reactions you don't want (a bit of kindling to get it going ok, passable, but not a "mix of logs & coal" that DOES cause nasty gassing & potential build up detrimental to your room, chimney, liner etc.Then again so does burning a sooty fire, this is precisely why folk should get chimneys swept & inspected every season, based on previous burns, slumber / hard burns at high heat etc.We tend to get about a pint pot of soot or less after a full season of daily use, ..fireplaces / woodburners are a "science" worth learning about for less hassle, better warmth & to keep you safe & your home insurance valid.& this is why I will bang on about fire cement & bailey "blue" chimney rods, they help get to know your stove / chimney & keep it all in good order with less need to get the professionals in.


Burning wood and coal together is a bad idea.#
Don't really understand the other stuff you've written
suited72

where is best price for the good coal does anyone know?Just had a log … where is best price for the good coal does anyone know?Just had a log burner fitted and I'm paying £3.99 in b&m for pretty decent smokeless.By the way, regarding the cost argument happening on here - I get about 4 hours of good heat for around £1.50. But no one should get a log burner to save money. To compare it though, Is like saying why buy filet steak when you can buy shin. And also it's a slight hedge against gas prices and or your boiler failing.


If you genuinly have a 'log burner' you can't burn coal which needs a grate and under grate air supply. Possibly you just mean a soid fuel or duel fuel stove, in which case you can.
bordonman

If you genuinly have a 'log burner' you can't burn coal which needs a … If you genuinly have a 'log burner' you can't burn coal which needs a grate and under grate air supply. Possibly you just mean a soid fuel or duel fuel stove, in which case you can.



I have a multi fuel stove. Doesn't say anything regarding not burning coal with logs together. Will look into that though. As to blowing the doors off, I simply don't believe that.
You'd definitely be burning money at this price.
suited72

I have a multi fuel stove. Doesn't say anything regarding not burning … I have a multi fuel stove. Doesn't say anything regarding not burning coal with logs together. Will look into that though. As to blowing the doors off, I simply don't believe that.




Ok, to save time look up sulphuric acid.
Burn wood and coal at the same time: burning coal produces sulphuric acid and wood can contain a lot of moisture - this combination can coat your chimney in sulphuric acid solution which can quickly eat away at anything.
Plus the conditions for burning wood efficiently are not the same as those for burning coal efficiently.

mixing fuels can also significantly shorten the life of the boiler if your stove is equipped with one. Much of the coal now imported into the country has a high sulphur content. Burning wood inevitably produces water vapour. Mix these two things together and you get an extremely aggressive sulphuric acid which will condense onto the nearest cold object it reaches – typically the boiler. If there is no boiler present then it can attack the stove components and flue
what about the smokeless fuels with wood? do they suffer the same issue?
I have my open fire done a few years ago and still LOVE it... Amazing watching the Flames Dance. I use both Coal and Wood (( collected as soon as I see some being chopped )) xx

Because I'm not that sad and if the heating needs to go on it does.

ellbee

[quote=hutchir9]That is so sad working out the kWh . You missed comparing … [quote=hutchir9]That is so sad working out the kWh . You missed comparing it to oil central heating, how does it compare to that? Since you're berating the poster who made the effort and since you think you're so smart why don't YOU work it out......?


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