Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
HP ProBook 450 G6 15.6" Laptop i7, 16GB RAM & 512GB SSD. Windows 10 Pro £749.70 delivered with code @ HP Shop (possible £727 with Quidco)
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HP ProBook 450 G6 15.6" Laptop i7, 16GB RAM & 512GB SSD. Windows 10 Pro £749.70 delivered with code @ HP Shop (possible £727 with Quidco)

24
Posted 30th Nov 2019Edited by:"caraid_alba"

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

I spotted this. An i7 processor, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD and Windows 10 Pro. At time of posting just under 58 hours left on promotional deal.
It is £882. However with the code: HPBLACK it knocks 15% off the price to £749.70.

If you go through Quidco first, click on the link for 15% off. This will take another 3% off, so you could take it down further to approx. £727 delivered!

I have checked others (Amazon £999.99), and the average price is just over £1000. So over 25% off is terrific for such a high spec laptop. Specs below taken from their website:

Windows 10 Pro 64- Intel® Core™ i7-8565U with Intel® UHD Graphics 620 (1.8 GHz base frequency, up to 4.6 GHz with Intel® Turbo Boost Technology, 8 MB cache, 4 cores)- 39.6 cm (15.6") diagonal FHD IPS eDP anti-glare LED-backlit, 220 cd/m², 67% sRGB (1920 x 1080)- 16 GB memory- 512 GB PCIe® NVMe™ M.2 SSD storage- 1 year standard parts and labour limited warranty
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24 Comments
Would expect dedicated GPU at this price
merb078630/11/2019 14:23

Would expect dedicated GPU at this price


You've confused me. Why? Only gaming laptops really need a dedicated GPU and they are a massive power drain on the battery.

Unless you are a gamer (or you are bizarrely fond of bad battery life) you don't want a dedicated GPU. You see none of the benefit and all of the drawbacks.
Edited by: "ScoobyStoo" 30th Nov 2019
This is a decent enough deal for a business machine if you need the grunt of the CPU (doing lots of number crunching). The problem with these G6 models is the cack keyboard and poor colour rendition of the screen.

Always focus on the quality of the things you actually interact with and then consider the components under the bonnet.
ScoobyStoo30/11/2019 15:14

This is a decent enough deal for a business machine if you need the grunt …This is a decent enough deal for a business machine if you need the grunt of the CPU (doing lots of number crunching). The problem with these G6 models is the cack keyboard and poor colour rendition of the screen.Always focus on the quality of the things you actually interact with and then consider the components under the bonnet.



Useful info - poor keyboard/trackpad has put me off several of the new laptops we have at work, I just cant use them. so I am still on an old Win7 Dell that has fab keyboard/trackpad until I find a new one that I consider usable. Thought this might have been a good option, especially as already has Windows 10 PRO to save re-installing the O/S - but will pass now.
apreading30/11/2019 15:18

Useful info - poor keyboard/trackpad has put me off several of the new …Useful info - poor keyboard/trackpad has put me off several of the new laptops we have at work, I just cant use them. so I am still on an old Win7 Dell that has fab keyboard/trackpad until I find a new one that I consider usable. Thought this might have been a good option, especially as already has Windows 10 PRO to save re-installing the O/S - but will pass now.


They aren't dreadful, but they aren't great. This isn't a bad deal for the price, but I'd quickly get fed up of the keyboard in particular.

So many people get hung up on things like CPU clock speed (which they will rarely notice unless doing computationally expensive tasks).
ScoobyStoo30/11/2019 14:45

You've confused me. Why? Only gaming laptops really need a dedicated GPU …You've confused me. Why? Only gaming laptops really need a dedicated GPU and they are a massive power drain on the battery.Unless you are a gamer (or you are bizarrely fond of bad battery life) you don't want a dedicated GPU. You see none of the benefit and all of the drawbacks.


As it’s £750 so you would expect something low-end at least, it takes load off the memory subsystem as you’re not sharing RAM and since around 2008, the laptops have hybrid graphics so the GPU isn’t in use unless you’re actually using it so there are actually no real drawbacks.

This machine is way overpriced, you can get an HP EliteBook 840 G5 for less than this, nearly new with the remainder of its 3 year HP warranty.

If you need the grunt of the CPU, then why would you get a power-constrained low-voltage U series chip badged as an i7 and not a full power H-series mobile chip?
Edited by: "plewis00" 1st Dec 2019
plewis0001/12/2019 07:27

As it’s £750 so you would expect something low-end at least, it takes load …As it’s £750 so you would expect something low-end at least, it takes load off the memory subsystem as you’re not sharing RAM and since around 2008, the laptops have hybrid graphics so the GPU isn’t in use unless you’re actually using it so there are actually no real drawbacks.This machine is way overpriced, you can get an HP EliteBook 840 G5 for less than this, nearly new with the remainder of its 3 year HP warranty.If you need the grunt of the CPU, then why would you get a power-constrained low-voltage U series chip badged as an i7 and not a full power H-series mobile chip?


My point remains, why pay for a dedicated GPU if it isn't going to be used? Even with a dedicated GPU most graphics load will still be handled on die within the Intel package and will use shared memory. The GPU will only be called upon for stuff like 3D rendering and HD video. It'll still always have a residual power draw though.

As to the processor, why would you want an H chip in a business machine like this? Machines like this are specced to provide maximum battery life, so a U chip is the correct choice.

I do agree that it's not a great deal though, but for different reasons to you. Business users (the target market for this HP range) can find better elsewhere.
ScoobyStoo01/12/2019 08:23

My point remains, why pay for a dedicated GPU if it isn't going to be …My point remains, why pay for a dedicated GPU if it isn't going to be used? Even with a dedicated GPU most graphics load will still be handled on die within the Intel package and will use shared memory. The GPU will only be called upon for stuff like 3D rendering and HD video. It'll still always have a residual power draw though.As to the processor, why would you want an H chip in a business machine like this? Machines like this are specced to provide maximum battery life, so a U chip is the correct choice.I do agree that it's not a great deal though, but for different reasons to you. Business users (the target market for this HP range) can find better elsewhere.


So why pay £750 for £500 spec worth of machine at all then? You’re arguing against a GPU for the sake of it, when the price rightly warrants one.

U-series is the correct choice for battery but then you’ve stated ‘CPU grunt’ in your next comment so you can’t have it all.

Business and consumer users can both find better value elsewhere - paying £750 for a Probook is too much money. I got my EliteBook 840 G5 for £500, it’s basically the same spec as this and it’s a premium ultrabook - they are not uncommon at this price point either but vastly superior in quality.
plewis0001/12/2019 07:27

As it’s £750 so you would expect something low-end at least, it takes load …As it’s £750 so you would expect something low-end at least, it takes load off the memory subsystem as you’re not sharing RAM and since around 2008, the laptops have hybrid graphics so the GPU isn’t in use unless you’re actually using it so there are actually no real drawbacks.This machine is way overpriced, you can get an HP EliteBook 840 G5 for less than this, nearly new with the remainder of its 3 year HP warranty.If you need the grunt of the CPU, then why would you get a power-constrained low-voltage U series chip badged as an i7 and not a full power H-series mobile chip?



Because the H series are not low power and so need a much bigger cooler? Not everyone wants to carry a brick around.

It’s the same reason that people spend 2k to buy a dell xps, or a ThinkPad x1 Carbon with a u series processor.

Don’t rate this laptop tho, no TB3. However if you’re not playing games on this it will be pretty fast and good for most office and professional works
gowf01/12/2019 08:40

Because the H series are not low power and so need a much bigger cooler? …Because the H series are not low power and so need a much bigger cooler? Not everyone wants to carry a brick around.It’s the same reason that people spend 2k to buy a dell xps, or a ThinkPad x1 Carbon with a u series processor.Don’t rate this laptop tho, no TB3. However if you’re not playing games on this it will be pretty fast and good for most office and professional works


The Dell XPS 15 does use an H-series and has a discrete GPU... this is not a good laptop for the money and I didn’t argue against the U-series, this is just far too much money for this spec of machine.

No TB3 is a much stranger complaint than no discrete GPU. The laptop will be ‘fine’ but at £750 you are not getting good value - that’s the problem with it.

This link shows the difference between a typical i5-8350U and this i7-8565U, as you’re constrained with thermals and power with these chips:
cpu.userbenchmark.com/Com…461
Edited by: "plewis00" 1st Dec 2019
plewis0001/12/2019 08:27

So why pay £750 for £500 spec worth of machine at all then? You’re arguing …So why pay £750 for £500 spec worth of machine at all then? You’re arguing against a GPU for the sake of it, when the price rightly warrants one. U-series is the correct choice for battery but then you’ve stated ‘CPU grunt’ in your next comment so you can’t have it all.Business and consumer users can both find better value elsewhere - paying £750 for a Probook is too much money. I got my EliteBook 840 G5 for £500, it’s basically the same spec as this and it’s a premium ultrabook - they are not uncommon at this price point either but vastly superior in quality.


Your argument makes no sense. You buy a machine specced for the job. Paying for dedicated GPU is pure idiocy if you don't need one. Buy a machine that puts your money to work where it will benefit you.

I can only say it as I see it. I'm the target market for this machine. I'm a business user. I want maximum battery life so I can work on long flights. I want decent CPU grunt so I can process financial models which contain 10s of millions of rows of data. I'm not a gamer so I don't need (or want) a dedicated GPU. The latest Intel integrated capabilities are more enough for my video needs.

What I do want if I'm going to comfortably spend 8 hours a day working on a piece of kit is good build quality, a top notch keyboard and (most importantly) an excellent screen.
ScoobyStoo01/12/2019 08:46

Your argument makes no sense. You buy a machine specced for the job. …Your argument makes no sense. You buy a machine specced for the job. Paying for dedicated GPU is pure idiocy if you don't need one. Buy a machine that puts your money to work where it will benefit you. I can only say it as I see it. I'm the target market for this machine. I'm a business user. I want maximum battery life so I can work on long flights. I want decent CPU grunt so I can process financial models which contain 10s of millions of rows of data. I'm not a gamer so I don't need (or want) a dedicated GPU. The latest Intel integrated capabilities are more enough for my video needs.What I do want if I'm going to comfortably spend 8 hours a day working on a piece of kit is good build quality, a top notch keyboard and (most importantly) an excellent screen.


If you want all that then why are you buying a ProBook and not an EliteBook? The build quality isn’t that great, the keyboard isn’t amazing from reviews either - the screen is decent and it’s the same one the EliteBook uses.

CPU grunt is achieved with an i5-8350U where you have the same quad-core silicon, not paying £750 for something that isn’t worth it just for the sake of the business sub-branding.

I’m also curious how you will achieve ‘great battery life’ with a 45Wh 3-cell battery? The display is only 67% sRGB too so it’s ok but not a mind-blowing panel.

Anyway, I’m not even convinced this was the best deal - they do the i5 version of this for less and even the i7 with the MX130 GPU for less (but a bit less SSD):
store.hp.com/UKS…NTB
Edited by: "plewis00" 1st Dec 2019
plewis0001/12/2019 08:43

The Dell XPS 15 does use an H-series and has a discrete GPU... this is not …The Dell XPS 15 does use an H-series and has a discrete GPU... this is not a good laptop for the money and I didn’t argue against the U-series, this is just far too much money for this spec of machine.No TB3 is a much stranger complaint than no discrete GPU. The laptop will be ‘fine’ but at £750 you are not getting good value - that’s the problem with it.This link shows the difference between a typical i5-8350U and this i7-8565U, as you’re constrained with thermals and power with these chips: https://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Intel-Core-i7-8565U-vs-Intel-Core-i5-8350U/m591977vsm388461



1. Your original point was that a lack of gpu was poor and that if there was a need for pure processing power, a H series would be better. That IS arguing against u series as a processor.

My point is that u series low power chips are consistently used in top tier laptops without GPUs.

2. Yell xps 15 costs upwards of 1500-2000. This is a 750 laptop with an NVMe 512 drive and 16gb ram. The specs aren’t bad for that price.

3. TB3 support would also external GPUs, that was the point.
gowf01/12/2019 08:56

1. Your original point was that a lack of gpu was poor and that if there …1. Your original point was that a lack of gpu was poor and that if there was a need for pure processing power, a H series would be better. That IS arguing against u series as a processor.My point is that u series low power chips are consistently used in top tier laptops without GPUs.2. Yell xps 15 costs upwards of 1500-2000. This is a 750 laptop with an NVMe 512 drive and 16gb ram. The specs aren’t bad for that price. 3. TB3 support would also external GPUs, that was the point.


No it wasn’t. I am arguing that if ‘CPU grunt’ is important then why buy a U series i7 which is less than 10% faster than the i5 U series but both still quad-core. The lack of GPU is poor but actually you can have the GPU for less money and a smaller SSD, see the link I posted above.

XPS 15 is expensive but a refurb or Outlet model can be nearer 800-900. The specs are bad as HP do a consumer model with similar specs for £400.

TB3 is still largely pointless as the external enclosures for GPUs are expensive - so literally no-one would spend £750 on a similar machine to spend £100 on an enclosure and a separate GPU.
Anyone dead set on a ProBook 450 G6, this seems to be the best value all-round and offers the GPU at £622 - half the RAM and SSD but easily fixed:
store.hp.com/UKS…NTB
plewis0001/12/2019 08:49

If you want all that then why are you buying a ProBook and not an …If you want all that then why are you buying a ProBook and not an EliteBook? The build quality isn’t that great, the keyboard isn’t amazing from reviews either - the screen is decent and it’s the same one the EliteBook uses. CPU grunt is achieved with an i5-8350U where you have the same quad-core silicon, not paying £750 for something that isn’t worth it just for the sake of the business sub-branding.I’m also curious how you will achieve ‘great battery life’ with a 45Wh 3-cell battery? The display is only 67% sRGB too so it’s ok but not a mind-blowing panel.Anyway, I’m not even convinced this was the best deal - they do the i5 version of this for less and even the i7 with the MX130 GPU for less (but a bit less SSD):https://store.hp.com/UKStore/Merch/Product.aspx?id=5PP90EA&opt=ABU&sel=NTB


You seem to misunderstand. I'm not the OP and I'm not buying this machine. It's decent enough as I said, but not a great deal. I wouldn't touch any machine at this price point with a very average quality panel such as this.

Each to their own as always. I'm done debating on this thread.
ScoobyStoo01/12/2019 09:05

You seem to misunderstand. I'm not the OP and I'm not buying this machine. …You seem to misunderstand. I'm not the OP and I'm not buying this machine. It's decent enough as I said, but not a great deal. I wouldn't touch any machine at this price point with a very average quality panel such as this.Each to their own as always. I'm done debating on this thread.


No - I do understand and I agree with you. This isn’t even the best ProBook 450 G6 for value and they offer the GPU option for virtually the same money. The battery life is also weak - as you value that (so do I) but 45Wh 3-cell isn’t going to offer it.
plewis0001/12/2019 09:00

No it wasn’t. I am arguing that if ‘CPU grunt’ is important then why buy a …No it wasn’t. I am arguing that if ‘CPU grunt’ is important then why buy a U series i7 which is less than 10% faster than the i5 U series but both still quad-core. The lack of GPU is poor but actually you can have the GPU for less money and a smaller SSD, see the link I posted above.XPS 15 is expensive but a refurb or Outlet model can be nearer 800-900. The specs are bad as HP do a consumer model with similar specs for £400.TB3 is still largely pointless as the external enclosures for GPUs are expensive - so literally no-one would spend £750 on a similar machine to spend £100 on an enclosure and a separate GPU.


You often find that the i5 series laptops have much less accompanying specs than the i7 ones within the same manufacturer.

So if someone wants 16gb ram and a larger ssd, you end up having to shell out for the i7. Eg Lenovo i5 versions of common models limit ram to 8. Agreed barely any difference between i5 and i7 u series. Otherwise they would never sell the i7 u series chips!

However the H series still needs a larger cooler and that will affect weight, fan noise etc.

I just think your idea that a dedicated gpu is necessary is just not a sensible argument. Many work and professional programs need 16gb ram rather than a gpu.

Comparing a refurbished product to a new is just not reasonable for most consumers.

Anyway I wouldn’t go near this laptop but someone looking for a large ssd and 16gb ram may do.
gowf01/12/2019 09:38

You often find that the i5 series laptops have much less accompanying …You often find that the i5 series laptops have much less accompanying specs than the i7 ones within the same manufacturer.So if someone wants 16gb ram and a larger ssd, you end up having to shell out for the i7. Eg Lenovo i5 versions of common models limit ram to 8. Agreed barely any difference between i5 and i7 u series. Otherwise they would never sell the i7 u series chips! However the H series still needs a larger cooler and that will affect weight, fan noise etc. I just think your idea that a dedicated gpu is necessary is just not a sensible argument. Many work and professional programs need 16gb ram rather than a gpu.Comparing a refurbished product to a new is just not reasonable for most consumers. Anyway I wouldn’t go near this laptop but someone looking for a large ssd and 16gb ram may do.


Yes but in this case, no: HP offers the i5 without the GPU and 512GB SSD here for less:
store.hp.com/UKS…NTB

RAM is cheap and simple to upgrade. H-series needs a bigger cooler but the fact it'll fit in a similar size chassis suggests that's not the reason they chose it.

I didn't say a dedicated GPU was necessary, I said I would expect it if paying this much and indeed HP offers reasonable alternatives with and without, though an MX130 isn't amazing, it does add good resell value and a bit of after-hours light gaming potential. The i7 in this case is meaningless, and I bought up the H-series as at least you get 6 cores not 4 by moving up to the i7. The battery is not stellar either here.

Refurbished is fine - how would a cheaper EliteBook 840 G5 with 3 years base warranty and likely over 2 years remaining not be better than a new ProBook with 1 year? I don't think consumers are the target market for a ProBook - it's strange middle-ground. Consumers buy Envy and Pavilions (from HP), ProBooks are really for SME and fleet buyers who don't want to pay for EliteBooks.

I don't directly disagree with any of the ideas people bought up here but £750 for this machine is not good value is really the crux of it.
plewis0001/12/2019 09:55

Yes but in this case, no: HP offers the i5 without the GPU and 512GB SSD …Yes but in this case, no: HP offers the i5 without the GPU and 512GB SSD here for less:https://store.hp.com/UKStore/Merch/Product.aspx?id=5PQ57EA&opt=ABU&sel=NTBRAM is cheap and simple to upgrade. H-series needs a bigger cooler but the fact it'll fit in a similar size chassis suggests that's not the reason they chose it.I didn't say a dedicated GPU was necessary, I said I would expect it if paying this much and indeed HP offers reasonable alternatives with and without, though an MX130 isn't amazing, it does add good resell value and a bit of after-hours light gaming potential. The i7 in this case is meaningless, and I bought up the H-series as at least you get 6 cores not 4 by moving up to the i7. The battery is not stellar either here. Refurbished is fine - how would a cheaper EliteBook 840 G5 with 3 years base warranty and likely over 2 years remaining not be better than a new ProBook with 1 year? I don't think consumers are the target market for a ProBook - it's strange middle-ground. Consumers buy Envy and Pavilions (from HP), ProBooks are really for SME and fleet buyers who don't want to pay for EliteBooks.I don't directly disagree with any of the ideas people bought up here but £750 for this machine is not good value is really the crux of it.


Just because you’re happy to open a laptop and add ram doesn’t mean the average consumer is. I bet most people that buy a hp laptop in this range wouldn’t even know what a torx screw is. In addition, sometimes ram is soldered and may be not dual but is single, on which you’d need to buy a single 16gb stick. Find the compatible with the size, right speed, know how to manipulate the bios etc

And same argument for the refurbished. If people only bought refurbished these companies would be out of business. It’s like saying buying a second hand car with warranty is the same as a new. It isn’t!

You can’t hold the average buyer to the same technical know how that you would have. It’s not reasonable.

Again I’m not defending this particular laptop. I don’t think it’s excellent value.
gowf01/12/2019 10:06

Just because you’re happy to open a laptop and add ram doesn’t mean the ave …Just because you’re happy to open a laptop and add ram doesn’t mean the average consumer is. I bet most people that buy a hp laptop in this range wouldn’t even know what a torx screw is. In addition, sometimes ram is soldered and may be not dual but is single, on which you’d need to buy a single 16gb stick. Find the compatible with the size, right speed, know how to manipulate the bios etc And same argument for the refurbished. If people only bought refurbished these companies would be out of business. It’s like saying buying a second hand car with warranty is the same as a new. It isn’t!You can’t hold the average buyer to the same technical know how that you would have. It’s not reasonable. Again I’m not defending this particular laptop. I don’t think it’s excellent value.


But why would the average consumer be buying a ProBook?! Anyway it's 2 slots and customer accessible according to HP.
www8.hp.com/h20…pdf

I don't get the refurbished thing with laptops, no. It's not a like a car. The ProBooks are positioned for larger buyers for business not consumers and designed to be upgradeable as well. If the consumer wasn't happy to upgrade the RAM but knew they needed 16GB I'd be surprised but then I'd also expect them to know someone like me or you to do it for them as a favour.

I think we both agree that this is not good value though.
plewis0001/12/2019 10:15

But why would the average consumer be buying a ProBook?! Anyway it's 2 …But why would the average consumer be buying a ProBook?! Anyway it's 2 slots and customer accessible according to HP. https://www8.hp.com/h20195/v2/getpdf.aspx/4AA7-3640EEAP.pdfI don't get the refurbished thing with laptops, no. It's not a like a car. The ProBooks are positioned for larger buyers for business not consumers and designed to be upgradeable as well. If the consumer wasn't happy to upgrade the RAM but knew they needed 16GB I'd be surprised but then I'd also expect them to know someone like me or you to do it for them as a favour. I think we both agree that this is not good value though.


Not everyone is a corporation, and not everyone is an average user. Hp are a big company they will not doubt have this targeted at a particular group.

Small businesses, sole traders and small IT subcontractors perhaps.

Secondly having an ability to upgrade doesn’t mean companies want to buy one so they upgrade it... the manpower and expertise time cost to upgrade and the ram module makes it not economically viable. If the necessity from a company is 16gb then I’d rather buy this than the cheaper 8gb and spend the time and money to upgrade.

Anyway Not one for us...
Still using a Probook 4720s and while it's showing it's age now, it's been a very solid machine. Yes, I've tinkered with it over the years but the only repair I've had to do was replacing the fan.

I find the modern Probooks a bit uninspiring and I think they've given up on 17" models. Increasingly it looks like my best option will be a gaming laptop, which while being overkill might still mean a decent level of build quality.
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