HPE Proliant ML10 Gen9 - £164.99, £104.99 after cashback @ Ebuyer
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HPE Proliant ML10 Gen9 - £164.99, £104.99 after cashback @ Ebuyer

£104.99
44
Found 11th JanMade hot 11th Jan
£164.99 before £60 Cashback (ends 31st January) Free Delivery.

HPE ProLiant ML10 Gen9 Pentium G4400 v5 2/3.4GHz 4GB Tower Server

4GB Memory Installed 64GB Max
HDD not included
Bays4 (total) / 4 (free) x internal 3.5" LFF
CPU- Intel Pentium G4400 / 3.3 GHz

44 Comments

Sagacity

HPE Proliant ML10 Gen9 - £104.99 @ Ebuyer


Usual HUKD convention / expectation is to state purchase price in deal title.

Good price. Shame they have cut corners so much since replacing the ML110 and removed the proper ILO card in favour of IntelAMT and ditched the front drive bays and Dual NIC's

Personally I'd look for a nearly new ML110 G7 instead....

Original Poster

AndyRoyd

Usual HUKD convention / expectation is to state purchase price in deal … Usual HUKD convention / expectation is to state purchase price in deal title.



Amended accordingly.

Original Poster

Uridium

Good price. Shame they have cut corners so much since replacing the ML110 … Good price. Shame they have cut corners so much since replacing the ML110 and removed the proper ILO card in favour of IntelAMT and ditched the front drive bays and Dual NIC'sPersonally I'd look for a nearly new ML110 G7 instead....



Agreed on most fronts, but for just over £100 the spec you get is fairly decent, I also believe it has 6 Sata ports unlike some other servers in this price range and therefore less messing about if you want to utilize more than 4 ports.

Now do I use this for a NAS?

If someone could figure out how to use this as a NAS, this would be great.

I've posted some info on the ML10 Gen9 here.

cjed

I've posted some info on the ML10 Gen9 here.



"This article will point out some of it’s advantages and disadvantages..."

*its

Very useful article though, thanks for sharing.

yes you can run xpenology or freenas on them

May not be the best, but as it's fundamentally a basic spec pc and you can't build one for this price.

Original Poster

cjed

I've posted some info on the ML10 Gen9 here.



Nice Info.

Thahleel

If someone could figure out how to use this as a NAS, this would be great.



​Nothing to figure out... Use unRaid

Sagacity

Agreed on most fronts, but for just over £100 the spec you get is fairly … Agreed on most fronts, but for just over £100 the spec you get is fairly decent, I also believe it has 6 Sata ports unlike some other servers in this price range and therefore less messing about if you want to utilize more than 4 ports.


The six ports is very useful, if you`re using it a NAS or media server then 4 Terrabyte disks are maybe the sweetest size to buy. My main server is full with 4x4, it`s amazing how quickly that has happened and I haven`t even ventured into 4K yet! It`s a pity all the USB 3 ports are one the back. I don`t think the lack of bracing is important in practice. If it is a full tower server, (it doesn`t as though it is) then that is a disadavatage.

SaleChaser

Now do I use this for a NAS?



More details can be found here.

jasee

The six ports is very useful, if you`re using it a NAS or media server … The six ports is very useful, if you`re using it a NAS or media server then 4 Terrabyte disks are maybe the sweetest size to buy. My main server is full with 4x4, it`s amazing how quickly that has happened and I haven`t even ventured into 4K yet! It`s a pity all the USB 3 ports are one the back. I don`t think the lack of bracing is important in practice. If it is a full tower server, (it doesn`t as though it is) then that is a disadavatage.



Do you think an 'averagely' techie person (not to your standard!) would manage this OK as a NAS?

Might seem silly to say this, but if a NAS was say 3 or 4 out of 10 on a complexity scale. What would setting this up be? Also, any idea how the power consumption would compare?

Thank you.

masktron

... Do you think an 'averagely' techie person (not to your standard!) … ... Do you think an 'averagely' techie person (not to your standard!) would manage this OK as a NAS?Might seem silly to say this, but if a NAS was say 3 or 4 out of 10 on a complexity scale. What would setting this up be? Also, any idea how the power consumption would compare?



If you just want to build something that provides Network Attached Storage then it's pretty straightforward - however, most people want other features, such as automated backups, media servers, VPN services etc.etc. and getting the software to support these features, installing and configuring it isn't straightforward (in your numbering you would be up at 7 / 8 ). That's part of the extra value that NAS vendors such as Synology and QNAP provide.

In hardware terms this box would (with a few caveats) make a decent basis for building your own NAS/Home Server, I was impressed by how low-power it could be (idle was around the 15W mark).

Edited by: "cjed" 12th Jan

cjed

If you just want to build something that provides Network Attached … If you just want to build something that provides Network Attached Storage then it's pretty straightforward - however, most people want other features, such as automated backups, media servers, VPN services etc.etc. and getting the software to support these features, installing and configuring it isn't straightforward (in your numbering you would be up at 7 / 8). That's part of the extra value that NAS vendors such as Synology and QNAP provide. In hardware terms this box would (with a few caveats) make a decent basis for building your own NAS/Home Server, I was impressed by how low-power it could be (idle was around the 15W mark).



Thank you for that, much appreciated.

SaleChaser

Now do I use this for a NAS?



I've been through a few operating systems using a few different PCs as the starting point for a NAS (including FreeNAS http://www.freenas.org/) but I've settled on Open Media Vault (openmediavault.org/?page_id=4) which is simply configured through your internet browser, once installed.

I found this guide very helpful as a starting point for installing and setting up OMV:

thekentishman.wordpress.com/gui…lt/

I use Ubuntu and Webmin for running my headless server.

Paper Lawyer

I've been through a few operating systems using a few different PCs as … I've been through a few operating systems using a few different PCs as the starting point for a NAS (including FreeNAS http://www.freenas.org/) but I've settled on Open Media Vault (http://www.openmediavault.org/?page_id=4) which is simply configured through your internet browser, once installed. I found this guide very helpful as a starting point for installing and setting up OMV:https://thekentishman.wordpress.com/guides-2/open-media-vault/



i use openmediavault on gen8 excellent NAS

mod

Reminder: no trading / buying / selling should take place in Deals and should only take place in FS
hotukdeals.com/for…512

Anyone know how many free RAM slots it comes with? I mean, I know it comes with 4GB, but is it all in one slot or what?

Edit; On the Ballicom website it states 1 x 4GB.
Edited by: "rickydg" 13th Jan

Original Poster

rickydg

Anyone know how many free RAM slots it comes with? I mean, I know it … Anyone know how many free RAM slots it comes with? I mean, I know it comes with 4GB, but is it all in one slot or what?Edit; On the Ballicom website it states 1 x 4GB.



As per Ebuyer site : Memory Specification Compliance PC4-17000
Installed Size 4 GB / 64 GB (max)
Technology DDR4 SDRAM - ECC
Effective Memory Speed 2133 MHz
Rated Memory Speed 2133 MHz
Form Factor DIMM 288-pin
Features Unbuffered, dual channel memory architecture
Configuration Features 1 x 4 GB

Does anyone know if this one supports S4 Suspend? My current server doesn't and it's a bit of a pain having to hibernate it so it's not just on permanently!

Does the integrated controller provide ZFS with direct disk access or would I need to fit a third party controller myself?

Great price for the spec, I've bought one to replace my N54L. Heat added.

ok. How do you 'work' this machine. When I boot it up, all I get in the boot options are UEFI Built-in EFI Shell, UEFI IP4 or UEFI IP6. That's with three different HDD (2 SSDs and old microserver drive)


rnem170

ok. How do you 'work' this machine. When I boot it up, all I get in the … ok. How do you 'work' this machine. When I boot it up, all I get in the boot options are UEFI Built-in EFI Shell, UEFI IP4 or UEFI IP6. That's with three different HDD (2 SSDs and old microserver drive)



Found the answer after a lot of searching....
h20566.www2.hpe.com/hps…28&

lol ... now another dumb issue. Get to my server login prompt - ie "Press CTRL + ALT + DELETE to log on". When it hit that, the machine reboots....

I'm now almost convinced that this server is a not worth the purchase price.
I registered it only to find that the warranty is only until October - as it if has been previously registered. Tech support for setting it up is expired (on 5th Jan) as that is only 90 days. The HP website won't let me download firmware, and the driver links there are broken. They don't supply a CD with it so you're buggered.

Managed to get it set up now. I was able to put drivers on the disk in my old microserver, then access it via remote desktop connection to install the correct drivers for the mouse/keyboard when in the ML10.

rnem170

Managed to get it set up now. I was able to put drivers on the disk in … Managed to get it set up now. I was able to put drivers on the disk in my old microserver, then access it via remote desktop connection to install the correct drivers for the mouse/keyboard when in the ML10.



Would you be able to try FreeNAS / FreeBSD with ZFS please?

If it's well supported I'll order one in a heartbeat but have received conflicting reports when checking on various forums and IRC.
Edited by: "denchington" 23rd Jan

Like others I thought this would be a sweet deal for a FreeNAS box; £105 after cashback for the Pentium, some more ECC memory to make 12G, and four 2Tb drives that were gathering dust. Some weeks later, after tearing my hair out with one issue after another, I'm sorry I ever made the purchase.

The good: It's quiet, and there is plenty of space inside for drives, though for any more than 4 you'll need power splitter cables (£10) for the 5th and a wiring kit for the 6th to use the optical connector. It's also very quiet, except for about 20 seconds after you attach the power cable, when the fans go into overdrive. There's also a TPM connector for adding that module for the security aware of you.

The bad: Graphics are twin Displayport only, and you either need a native cable, or an active (not passive) adapter. This may easily set you back another £25 to find one that works. The BIOS menu us awful, and if you've had to mess about as much as I had with different CDs and drives, the constant selecting of the right boot device is agonising.

The ugly: HPE's support site is cripplingly slow and cumbersome, and very much set up for Enterprise, not the casual user. Like others here, once registered, the support clock started from October 2016, not Jan 17, as if it had already been registered. That meant that my initial support had already expired, and I was not longer able to download updates! A support ticket was needed to reset...

Out of the box it doesn't support headless (ie without an attached monitor) operation, which means it's pretty useless for slinging in a cupboard without a monitor, so you have to figure out exactly the right combination of pull downs on the site to get the files you need. The 1.04 firmware you need for headless isn't included in the Proliant SPP rollups packages (who knew?), and can only be found for Windows 2012R2 (not essentials). The way round that is to find an old Windows 8.1 disk and temporarily install that (any number of Linux Distros stubbornly refusing to create the appropriate flash files) and eventually I successfully applied it.

Now that I've gone through all the learning and pain, it seems to be rock solid; haven't had a chance to benchmark data transfer performance versus my Gen8 Microserver yet but it looks promising. Given the time it took to iron out all the wrinkles though, my "bargain" represented poor value for money.... your mileage may vary.

tinmanruss

Like others I thought this would be a sweet deal for a FreeNAS box; £105 … Like others I thought this would be a sweet deal for a FreeNAS box; £105 after cashback for the Pentium, some more ECC memory to make 12G, and four 2Tb drives that were gathering dust. Some weeks later, after tearing my hair out with one issue after another, I'm sorry I ever made the purchase. The good: It's quiet, and there is plenty of space inside for drives, though for any more than 4 you'll need power splitter cables (£10) for the 5th and a wiring kit for the 6th to use the optical connector. It's also very quiet, except for about 20 seconds after you attach the power cable, when the fans go into overdrive. There's also a TPM connector for adding that module for the security aware of you.The bad: Graphics are twin Displayport only, and you either need a native cable, or an active (not passive) adapter. This may easily set you back another £25 to find one that works. The BIOS menu us awful, and if you've had to mess about as much as I had with different CDs and drives, the constant selecting of the right boot device is agonising.The ugly: HPE's support site is cripplingly slow and cumbersome, and very much set up for Enterprise, not the casual user. Like others here, once registered, the support clock started from October 2016, not Jan 17, as if it had already been registered. That meant that my initial support had already expired, and I was not longer able to download updates! A support ticket was needed to reset...Out of the box it doesn't support headless (ie without an attached monitor) operation, which means it's pretty useless for slinging in a cupboard without a monitor, so you have to figure out exactly the right combination of pull downs on the site to get the files you need. The 1.04 firmware you need for headless isn't included in the Proliant SPP rollups packages (who knew?), and can only be found for Windows 2012R2 (not essentials). The way round that is to find an old Windows 8.1 disk and temporarily install that (any number of Linux Distros stubbornly refusing to create the appropriate flash files) and eventually I successfully applied it.Now that I've gone through all the learning and pain, it seems to be rock solid; haven't had a chance to benchmark data transfer performance versus my Gen8 Microserver yet but it looks promising. Given the time it took to iron out all the wrinkles though, my "bargain" represented poor value for money.... your mileage may vary.



Thanks for the incredibly detailed response, did you experience any problems with the stock SATA controller?

Only isues I had there were when I switched to and from UEFI and Legacy support in order to try and flash the hard drive bios; it has very little support for booting legacy OS such as DOS to use manufacturer utilities. If you need to do things like that I'd advise you use a different box.

As I said above, the BIOS menus to recognise and select different boot devices are very clunky (especially when you have four or five SATA drives, the internal USB and an external CD ROM all connected); takes a while to get your head around how it shows them.

Other than that the controller has worked fine; I never played with the RAID settings as FreeNAS likes to assume direct control of the disks in ZFS.

tinmanruss

Like others I thought this would be a sweet deal for a FreeNAS box; £105 … Like others I thought this would be a sweet deal for a FreeNAS box; £105 after cashback for the Pentium, some more ECC memory to make 12G, and four 2Tb drives that were gathering dust. Some weeks later, after tearing my hair out with one issue after another, I'm sorry I ever made the purchase. The good: It's quiet, and there is plenty of space inside for drives, though for any more than 4 you'll need power splitter cables (£10) for the 5th and a wiring kit for the 6th to use the optical connector. It's also very quiet, except for about 20 seconds after you attach the power cable, when the fans go into overdrive. There's also a TPM connector for adding that module for the security aware of you.The bad: Graphics are twin Displayport only, and you either need a native cable, or an active (not passive) adapter. This may easily set you back another £25 to find one that works. The BIOS menu us awful, and if you've had to mess about as much as I had with different CDs and drives, the constant selecting of the right boot device is agonising.The ugly: HPE's support site is cripplingly slow and cumbersome, and very much set up for Enterprise, not the casual user. Like others here, once registered, the support clock started from October 2016, not Jan 17, as if it had already been registered. That meant that my initial support had already expired, and I was not longer able to download updates! A support ticket was needed to reset...Out of the box it doesn't support headless (ie without an attached monitor) operation, which means it's pretty useless for slinging in a cupboard without a monitor, so you have to figure out exactly the right combination of pull downs on the site to get the files you need. The 1.04 firmware you need for headless isn't included in the Proliant SPP rollups packages (who knew?), and can only be found for Windows 2012R2 (not essentials). The way round that is to find an old Windows 8.1 disk and temporarily install that (any number of Linux Distros stubbornly refusing to create the appropriate flash files) and eventually I successfully applied it.Now that I've gone through all the learning and pain, it seems to be rock solid; haven't had a chance to benchmark data transfer performance versus my Gen8 Microserver yet but it looks promising. Given the time it took to iron out all the wrinkles though, my "bargain" represented poor value for money.... your mileage may vary.





mmmmm my N40 and 54L have been cracking littler boxes for my needs and shilst I would have liked one of the Dell cheaper boxes I missed the deal. This one seems good enough but with what you have written it doesn'tr inspire me with enthusiasm.

It might be overkill (?) for it to be used as a pfsense router and firewall but with the Pentium supporting AES encryption it should be fine with a VPN client configured and full speed. My traditional router would then be used as a Action Point for Wi-Fi.

With an additional Intel LAN card thrown in, so then I have the WAN and LAN covered do you see much issues with that....?

Typical power on use seems around 15w or so and overall with the cashback it should be fine. I have a spare LP GPU that I can throw in it to boot to a VGA monitor to set pfsense up but then will it boot ok without a monitor attached....?

Hi VimesUK,

Haven't used pfsense, but don't be put off by the pentium badge; the processor itself fairly motors along for normal use; for sure you wouldn't want to use it as a heavy duty esx host, but the AES encryption seems to work fine protecting my freenas drives without undue overhead.

As I say though, you MUST upgrade to firmware 1.04 to use it in headless mode (additional GPU or not it in my experience); it simply wouldn't boot without that. The only way I could apply it was to temporarily install Windows 8.1 on it as the Linux install seemed to uncover one dependency after another that unless you know Linux well, will lead to a strong desire to lob the box out of the window.

The box would be a bit physically big for me to just use as a router/firewall, but that's just personal preference; the real driver for me was space and power for 4/5 drives for my purpose. Maybe better off for a firewall picking up a slimline i3 workstation from fleabay and lobbing a low profile dual nic card in it; memory will be cheaper too.
Edited by: "tinmanruss" 5th Feb

@tinmanruss thanks for posting that. I have been considering many options and that would include a GIGABYTE N3050M mATX motherboard, which has a Celeron CPU which has hardware AES encryption built in. That is £36. Throw in a case, I have RAM and a PSU and I'm up and running.

This server is good for its cost, there is little doubt. But not everything changed for the better from the N54l, or even the Gen8 type.

No VGA, for goodness sake...!

Original Poster

N3050 is a horrendous processor compared to the G4400. But depends what your needs are i guess. For example you could run this setup as a PLEX Server transcoding no chance with an N3050

marcins

i use openmediavault on gen8 excellent NAS



I've looked at buying something like this HP server in the past but have trialled Freenas etc on Virtualbox with some problems. e.g. Installing, using two virtual HDDs, then trying out "disasters" like corrupting/swapping virtual HDDs to see what happens when things go wrong....and I experienced some problems. Is this something that people here have already done using suggested NAS solutions like openmediavault? i.e. Have people used these NAS solutions and been through a drive failure without issue?

I'm curious as to why software is even required; can the server not be set up with its own bios/hardware raid and then just some plain server software run on it ?
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