This deal was published more than 2 weeks ago and may no longer be available.
HSBC 1.54% 5 year fix 75% LTV £999 fee
579°

HSBC 1.54% 5 year fix 75% LTV £999 fee

67
Posted 13th May
Saw the nationwide deal at 1.59% is on the hottest deal of the day. This one is cheaper on the interest rate front and lower on the fees. Nationwide have a £65 admin fee at the end whereas HSBC dont. Also the telegraphic transfer fee is £17 instead of £20. Every penny counts.

HSBC are also the most successful at autovals currently meaning no delay and need for someone to come visit.

Same deal at Halifax but it’s broker only so I’m not posting it.
Community Updates

Groups

Top comments
Loving all these top mortgage deals.

Now only need a house to mortgage :')
67 Comments
Loving all these top mortgage deals.

Now only need a house to mortgage :')
Deal.hunter12313/05/2020 10:29

Loving all these top mortgage deals. Now only need a house to mortgage :')


It’s ok, they’ll be half price soon according to the doomers
donny126613/05/2020 10:32

It’s ok, they’ll be half price soon according to the doomers


They will certainly be cheaper
ozzmosiz13/05/2020 10:34

They will certainly be cheaper


I think a lot of people will be moving out of cities, yes. Flats will drop in value a lot. Homes with big gardens in the countryside will probably increase in value as people work from home and move towards a healthier lifestyle.
donny126613/05/2020 10:43

I think a lot of people will be moving out of cities, yes. Flats will drop …I think a lot of people will be moving out of cities, yes. Flats will drop in value a lot. Homes with big gardens in the countryside will probably increase in value as people work from home and move towards a healthier lifestyle.


What about all those people who have been made redundant (or will be later). How will the continue to pay their mortgages.

What about those who keep their jobs bit are mortgaged to their limits and will.have to face higher taxes soon to pay for the government spending to keep paying those who are furloughed?
ozzmosiz13/05/2020 10:45

What about all those people who have been made redundant (or will be …What about all those people who have been made redundant (or will be later). How will the continue to pay their mortgages. What about those who keep their jobs bit are mortgaged to their limits and will.have to face higher taxes soon to pay for the government spending to keep paying those who are furloughed?


They won’t be moving so the price of their house won’t be reflected in any figures. The price of your house only matters when you buy it and when you sell it. The rest of the time it’s just a place to live
Edited by: "donny1266" 13th May
donny126613/05/2020 10:46

They won’t be moving so the price of their house won’t be reflected in any …They won’t be moving so the price of their house won’t be reflected in any figures. The price of your house only matters when you buy it and when you sell it. The rest of the time it’s just a place to live


But if you can't repay your mortgage, your house gets repossessed and then auctioned - or you try and sell it before repossession happens.
M_z13/05/2020 10:52

But if you can't repay your mortgage, your house gets repossessed and then …But if you can't repay your mortgage, your house gets repossessed and then auctioned - or you try and sell it before repossession happens.


The lenders put you on interest only and the government provide a support for mortgage interest payments until you return to work, generally.
donny126613/05/2020 10:54

The lenders put you on interest only and the government provide a support …The lenders put you on interest only and the government provide a support for mortgage interest payments until you return to work, generally.


What if they're on interest only and still cant pay
Government wont have any money left.
ozzmosiz13/05/2020 10:56

What if they're on interest only and still cant payGovernment wont have …What if they're on interest only and still cant payGovernment wont have any money left.


An interest only mortgage costs a lot less than rent. The government program Support for Mortgage Interest Payments exists just as universal credit does. It’s not going away.
In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a lot of variables but roughly when do people think house prices will start to go down?
Hunttterrr13/05/2020 11:01

In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a …In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a lot of variables but roughly when do people think house prices will start to go down?


On paper they already have

-in the same boat as you-

thisismoney.co.uk/mon…tml
Hunttterrr13/05/2020 11:01

In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a …In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a lot of variables but roughly when do people think house prices will start to go down?


People think this a lot. 2008/9 we were told that prices would never be the same. Since then they’ve doubled in some places. After the brexit referendum we were told this, yet prices are 15% up since then. After brexit was confirmed and the election we were told that and then there was a 5-10% increase until covid.

There are a people who have paid hundreds of thousands in rent waiting for the dip
donny126613/05/2020 10:54

The lenders put you on interest only and the government provide a support …The lenders put you on interest only and the government provide a support for mortgage interest payments until you return to work, generally.


Yes, and that might be enough for most people, especially with such low interest rates. Nobody can be totally sure though, it depends if people can quickly get back into work, or if there are other economic factors around the corner.
Hunttterrr13/05/2020 11:01

In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a …In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a lot of variables but roughly when do people think house prices will start to go down?


"Time in the Market is Better Than Timing the Market"

I thought things felt peaky when we first bought a house in 2008 (on the cusp of the financial crises) and in our area that house has doubled in price since. Buy a house as a home and long term you won't go wrong and it will appreciate.
donny126613/05/2020 11:04

People think this a lot. 2008/9 we were told that prices would never be …People think this a lot. 2008/9 we were told that prices would never be the same. Since then they’ve doubled in some places. After the brexit referendum we were told this, yet prices are 15% up since then. After brexit was confirmed and the election we were told that and then there was a 5-10% increase until covid. There are a people who have paid hundreds of thousands in rent waiting for the dip


People said that house prices won't drop before the 2008 crash, they did and I did okay out of it when I bought in 2012 (they didn't double instantly!). House prices will go down. Government insisting on pushing through with Brexit will create even more uncertainty, something the markets hate, which means things will change. Loads of new houses being built near me, how will they sell if there is a recession and people simpy don't have the money?
hotbadger201713/05/2020 11:15

"Time in the Market is Better Than Timing the Market"I thought things felt …"Time in the Market is Better Than Timing the Market"I thought things felt peaky when we first bought a house in 2008 (on the cusp of the financial crises) and in our area that house has doubled in price since. Buy a house as a home and long term you won't go wrong and it will appreciate.


We shouldn’t view our residential home as an investment, but you’re right. 90% of the time a world index tracker beats people buying individual stocks, yet people think they can get rich gambling on them.
TKDBlackbelt13/05/2020 11:16

People said that house prices won't drop before the 2008 crash, they did …People said that house prices won't drop before the 2008 crash, they did and I did okay out of it when I bought in 2012 (they didn't double instantly!). House prices will go down. Government insisting on pushing through with Brexit will create even more uncertainty, something the markets hate, which means things will change. Loads of new houses being built near me, how will they sell if there is a recession and people simpy don't have the money?


I think it’s because there’s a huge shortage of housing. They’ve never kept up with demand. Problem with governance which I expect is due to them wanting to keep prices high with policy.


bbc.co.uk/new…912

1.2 million homes needed before corona. Probably still 1.15m needed after
Edited by: "donny1266" 13th May
donny126613/05/2020 11:18

I think it’s because there’s a huge shortage of housing. They’ve never kept …I think it’s because there’s a huge shortage of housing. They’ve never kept up with demand. Problem with governance which I expect is due to them wanting to keep prices high with policy.www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-516059121.2 million homes needed before corona. Probably still 1.15m needed after


House of cards with the governments buy scheme, developers propped up by inflated house prices because people are taking out massive deposits via the scheme which means they borrow more and that in turn means developers charge more for the house. Those schemes are staring to come to fruition with borrowers having to start to pay back the deposit loans as well as their mortgage! I was always told you couldn't take out a loan to use as a deposit, the government just allowed that to prop up the market and it's going to crash.
Cheers folks for the insight, gives me some clarity amidst all the confusion and I agree house prices will always appreciate so you never really end up paying too much but who doesn't like a good deal eh
TKDBlackbelt13/05/2020 11:25

House of cards with the governments buy scheme, developers propped up by …House of cards with the governments buy scheme, developers propped up by inflated house prices because people are taking out massive deposits via the scheme which means they borrow more and that in turn means developers charge more for the house. Those schemes are staring to come to fruition with borrowers having to start to pay back the deposit loans as well as their mortgage! I was always told you couldn't take out a loan to use as a deposit, the government just allowed that to prop up the market and it's going to crash.


We’ve heard the market is going to crash since the 90s though. The scheme was designed to get young people on the ladder with limited deposits. Makes sense in a way as it the value of the property drops, you owe the government less money.

The only way I can see a crash is if the Lib Dem’s get in to power. Labour and conservative mps aren’t cash rich but they are all asset rich through property. There’s no way they damage their leverage imo.
Hunttterrr13/05/2020 11:01

In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a …In the market for a new house (first time buyer)and I understand there's a lot of variables but roughly when do people think house prices will start to go down?


In my opinion it's s directly related to the job market, wages and unemployment. I think near the end of the year we will have a clearer view of the impact of this virus on the economy.
Hunttterrr13/05/2020 11:26

Cheers folks for the insight, gives me some clarity amidst all the …Cheers folks for the insight, gives me some clarity amidst all the confusion and I agree house prices will always appreciate so you never really end up paying too much but who doesn't like a good deal eh


You of course end up paying too much as buying a property at a high prices means excessive interest on the amount you borrow. Buy at £150k you pay £300k Inc interest, buy at £125k you pay £250k!
donny126613/05/2020 11:29

We’ve heard the market is going to crash since the 90s though. The scheme w …We’ve heard the market is going to crash since the 90s though. The scheme was designed to get young people on the ladder with limited deposits. Makes sense in a way as it the value of the property drops, you owe the government less money. The only way I can see a crash is if the Lib Dem’s get in to power. Labour and conservative mps aren’t cash rich but they are all asset rich through property. There’s no way they damage their leverage imo.


And the market has crashed in that time....
TKDBlackbelt13/05/2020 11:47

And the market has crashed in that time....


If the market wasn't so inflated then people would be able to buy at a reasonable cost without excessive deposits. Should always require 10% deposit otherwise we see stupid 100 or 110 percent mortgages again which created issues before
TKDBlackbelt13/05/2020 11:47

And the market has crashed in that time....

40732856-9t2Df.jpg

Crash seems a strong word for that kind of graph.
TKDBlackbelt13/05/2020 11:48

If the market wasn't so inflated then people would be able to buy at a …If the market wasn't so inflated then people would be able to buy at a reasonable cost without excessive deposits. Should always require 10% deposit otherwise we see stupid 100 or 110 percent mortgages again which created issues before


I agree to some extent. Most people should be putting down 10%. 95% mortgages should be reserved for HNW clients
donny126613/05/2020 11:49

[Image] Crash seems a strong word for that kind of graph.


Yes true crash was wrongly used.
Only doing this deal to increase the demand for houses. If there was no demand, there investment would look a lot less attractive and a lot more risky. I would personally wait six months see how the market pans out before buying house PWC predicts a 5% decline in house values a 5% decrease on £200K saving of £10k worth waiting. Don't want to be in a position of negative equity.
Edited by: "Adam131" 13th May
TKDBlackbelt13/05/2020 11:59

Yes true crash was wrongly used.


I believe the government meddle in interest rates, house prices and many things that relate to house market, they shouldn't as it should exist as another consumer market driven by market forces not tweaks here and there that the government introduce.
Adam13113/05/2020 12:09

Only doing this deal to increase the demand for houses. If there was no …Only doing this deal to increase the demand for houses. If there was no demand there investment would look a lot less attractive and a lot more risky. I would personally wait six months see how the market pans out before buying house.


This is a remortgage deal too.

The deal is this price because the base rate is 0.1%. Borrow at that level, mark up to 1.54%. If the base rate was 3% this deal would probably be 4% etc. Hsbc have little interest in the price of houses above them being security.
donny126613/05/2020 11:04

People think this a lot. 2008/9 we were told that prices would never be …People think this a lot. 2008/9 we were told that prices would never be the same. Since then they’ve doubled in some places. After the brexit referendum we were told this, yet prices are 15% up since then. After brexit was confirmed and the election we were told that and then there was a 5-10% increase until covid. There are a people who have paid hundreds of thousands in rent waiting for the dip


This is nothing like 2008 or Brexit or anything else we've ever seen in our life time.

What is happening to the world economy today is essentially the end of fiat money as we know it. America is printing money like it's going out of fashion and all those who owe debt to them are going to fall with them. Why do you think Russia and China are trying to off load as much dollar debt as they possibly can?

This is not financial advice, but I'd try and hold some bitcoin now if I were you, I would say gold and silver too.. but no one can get a hold of physical good and silver.

We're in uncharted territory, no one knows the full outcome for sure, but I would be very surprised if it was a good one.
Cryptofriendly13/05/2020 17:05

This is nothing like 2008 or Brexit or anything else we've ever seen in …This is nothing like 2008 or Brexit or anything else we've ever seen in our life time.What is happening to the world economy today is essentially the end of fiat money as we know it. America is printing money like it's going out of fashion and all those who owe debt to them are going to fall with them. Why do you think Russia and China are trying to off load as much dollar debt as they possibly can?This is not financial advice, but I'd try and hold some bitcoin now if I were you, I would say gold and silver too.. but no one can get a hold of physical good and silver.We're in uncharted territory, no one knows the full outcome for sure, but I would be very surprised if it was a good one.


Username checks out.

Bitcoin investors are cashing out massively at the moment. Think I’ll take another look when it goes back down to 3.5k in a few months.
donny126613/05/2020 17:06

Username checks out. Bitcoin investors are cashing out massively at the …Username checks out. Bitcoin investors are cashing out massively at the moment. Think I’ll take another look when it goes back down to 3.5k in a few months.


There will likely be another dip in crypto when the markets and the dollar finally go kaput, granted. But even buying it now at this price is going to be nothing compared to the prices it will reach in the future. And when hyper inflation hits America/euro/pound and the bank's stop people transferring money, what are you going to do to buy bitcoin then? Black market? With a currency that's dropping by the second? It's up to you but I'd atleast position some capital so you're able to quickly buy that bitcoin without issues.
Cryptofriendly13/05/2020 17:13

There will likely be another dip in crypto when the markets and the dollar …There will likely be another dip in crypto when the markets and the dollar finally go kaput, granted. But even buying it now at this price is going to be nothing compared to the prices it will reach in the future. And when hyper inflation hits America/euro/pound and the bank's stop people transferring money, what are you going to do to buy bitcoin then? Black market? With a currency that's dropping by the second? It's up to you but I'd atleast position some capital so you're able to quickly buy that bitcoin without issues.


If bitcoin is so hard to access it’ll become worthless though.

People will stop mining as it won’t be worth it imo.
donny126613/05/2020 17:15

If bitcoin is so hard to access it’ll become worthless though. People will …If bitcoin is so hard to access it’ll become worthless though. People will stop mining as it won’t be worth it imo.


People will find ways of doing it. But as things stand right now you use your bank to transfer to an exchange and purchase. That's the norm atleast.

When Venezuela's currency started to hyper-inflate the price of bitcoin soared on local exchanges and places like local bitcoin. The same happened in Iran a year or so later and the same for turkey too... Amongst other counties. I have no reason to believe the same won't happen again, but as the dollar is the leading currency in the world this will have a massive effect this time.
Cryptofriendly13/05/2020 17:38

People will find ways of doing it. But as things stand right now you use …People will find ways of doing it. But as things stand right now you use your bank to transfer to an exchange and purchase. That's the norm atleast.When Venezuela's currency started to hyper-inflate the price of bitcoin soared on local exchanges and places like local bitcoin. The same happened in Iran a year or so later and the same for turkey too... Amongst other counties. I have no reason to believe the same won't happen again, but as the dollar is the leading currency in the world this will have a massive effect this time.


Agree it could happen, but we could also see negative inflation.
Looked in to Venezuela a lot and bitcoin made a lot of sense there. I just can’t see it being accepted in the West by businesses, especially with the risk of laundering etc.
No fee for premier clients...

Kindest regards
I'm with HSBC for my mortgage, but have about a year left on my 2 year deal. Can you switch mid way or would that incur charges?
dmannn13/05/2020 19:51

I'm with HSBC for my mortgage, but have about a year left on my 2 year …I'm with HSBC for my mortgage, but have about a year left on my 2 year deal. Can you switch mid way or would that incur charges?


Sadly yes, a 2% of balance charge
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text