Hyundai ix35 1.7 crdi s £15444.86 @ GBcardeals
414°Expired

Hyundai ix35 1.7 crdi s £15444.86 @ GBcardeals

61
Found 26th May 2014
This is a fantastic deal ! Lot of car for the money and it's diesel , what more do you want ? £15444.86 . Saving £3055 amazing!

61 Comments

more power?

According to Parkers, it delivers 114bhp, which is pretty much in-line with other BSA-based turbo-diesel engines you see in Peugeots, Citroens, Fords etc. A combined 48mpg on a big lump like this is also pretty decent. The 2.0 diesel offers a lot more power, but for almost £20K. This seems like a great deal to me.

Body Glass
Electric front+rear windows
Intermittent front wipe with adjustable delay
One touch open on drivers window
Rear wiper
Windscreen shadeband
Brakes
ABS/EBD
ESP + traction control
Hill descent control
Hill start assist control (HAC)
Trailer stability assist
Driver Aids
PAS
Driver Information
Trip computer
Driving Mirrors
Body colour door mirrors
Electric heated door mirrors
Entertainment
6 speakers
RDS stereo radio + CD player/mp3 facility
USB/aux input socket
Exterior Body Features
Body colour bumpers
Body colour door handles
Rear spoiler
Exterior Lights
Follow me home headlights
LED daytime running lights
Heating/Cooling/Ventilation
Air conditioning
Interior Features
12V power outlets
Cloth upholstery
Front and rear cupholders
Front and rear door pockets
Front centre armrest with storage compartment
Height/reach adjustable steering column
Lockable cooled glovebox
Luggage hooks
Rear centre armrest
Retractable load cover
Sunglasses holder
Interior Lights
Front and rear map reading lights
Safety
'Childproof' rear door locks
Active front headrests
Driver and passenger airbags
Front side airbags + full size curtain airbags
Height adjustable front seatbelts
Passenger airbag deactivate switch
Seatbelt pretensioners
Seatbelt warning
Three 3 point rear seatbelts
Tyre pressure monitoring system - Low line
Seats
60/40 split folding flat to floor rear seats
Adjustable front and rear head restraints
Front seatback pockets
Height adjustable driver's seat
Isofix rear child seat preparation
Security
Alarm and remote central locking
Automatic door locking
Deadlocks
Engine immobiliser
Locking wheel nuts
Vanity Mirrors
Driver/passenger sunvisors and vanity mirrors
Wheels - Alloy
16" alloy wheels

Shame it's not a 7-seater, good price anyway

crazycyp

more power?



More power for what? to get upto 30mph quicker?

This price wouldn't even get you a entry level golf

realBoss

Body GlassElectric front+rear windowsIntermittent front wipe with … Body GlassElectric front+rear windowsIntermittent front wipe with adjustable delayOne touch open on drivers windowRear wiperWindscreen shadebandBrakesABS/EBDESP + traction controlHill descent controlHill start assist control (HAC)Trailer stability assistDriver AidsPASDriver InformationTrip computerDriving MirrorsBody colour door mirrorsElectric heated door mirrorsEntertainment6 speakersRDS stereo radio + CD player/mp3 facilityUSB/aux input socketExterior Body FeaturesBody colour bumpersBody colour door handlesRear spoilerExterior LightsFollow me home headlightsLED daytime running lightsHeating/Cooling/VentilationAir conditioningInterior Features12V power outletsCloth upholsteryFront and rear cupholdersFront and rear door pocketsFront centre armrest with storage compartmentHeight/reach adjustable steering columnLockable cooled gloveboxLuggage hooksRear centre armrestRetractable load coverSunglasses holderInterior LightsFront and rear map reading lightsSafety'Childproof' rear door locksActive front headrestsDriver and passenger airbagsFront side airbags + full size curtain airbagsHeight adjustable front seatbeltsPassenger airbag deactivate switchSeatbelt pretensionersSeatbelt warningThree 3 point rear seatbeltsTyre pressure monitoring system - Low lineSeats60/40 split folding flat to floor rear seatsAdjustable front and rear head restraintsFront seatback pocketsHeight adjustable driver's seatIsofix rear child seat preparationSecurityAlarm and remote central lockingAutomatic door lockingDeadlocksEngine immobiliserLocking wheel nutsVanity MirrorsDriver/passenger sunvisors and vanity mirrorsWheels - Alloy16" alloy wheels


Describes a car lol

can anyone comment on this company are they reliable? how come they are so much cheaper than any other site/dealer?

1.7 litre engine for a diesel!! im with crazycyp on this one. You need more power to stay at 30mph on a slight incline!! With 5 occupants, this will struggle.

More power for what? to get upto 30mph quicker?



If most of your Journeys are at 30mph then you really shouldn't be considering a MODERN diesel car. New diesels have DPF (diesel particulate filters) which require regular journeys at Dual Carriageway / Motorway speeds in order to clean (regenerate) themselves.

Because of the soot particles which diesel cars emit, DPF's do block fairly quickly and these regeneration cycles are required at roughly 300 - 700 mile intervals (depending on model, driving style and the DPF design). A regeneration can only take place with a high exhaust temperature and takes upto 20 - 25 minutes on some models to complete - therefore cars which aren't frequently driven for long enough journeys, in order to get the exhaust to a high enough temperature, on trips less than 25 minutes at highway speeds will potentially never get the opportunity to go through their programmed regeneration cycle.

So, If you use mainly cars for city driving / school / shopping runs or heavy traffic stop - start commutes then expect problems farther down the line, expensive problems because the DPF won't be able to regenerate resulting in it becoming blocked to the point where it cannot function, and the engine management light illuminating.

Should this happen, and the DPF be at a stage where it is too blocked to clean itself, then a dealer forced regeneration costs £100 - £200 a time, if that fails then you will be back on here moaning that you have just had a bill for £1000+ to replace the DPF, and it isn't covered under warranty. Google it, because this happens more often than most people would like, and the cost a replacement quickly negates the savings made by diesel economy.

So city driving / school runs / under 12k miles a year / little motorway / dual carriageway travel - Get a petrol or an older diesel
12k+ miles per year / regular motorway travel / long daily commutes - You will be fine with a modern diesel

Don't just take my word for it or think that its rare, google 'DPF Problems" "Dpf blocked" or "Dpf warning light" to find hundreds of examples of owners who have made the same expensive mistakes.

The whole DPF issue has also been covered pretty extensively in the press, the problem is real, and the advice should be heeded..

thisismoney.co.uk/mon…tml
whatcar.com/car…916
dailymail.co.uk/new…tml

Even VW state openly that you should discuss your driving patterns and style with the dealer before buying a diesel car, in order for the dealer to assess the suitability of your intended vehicle use with the requirements of the on board DPF system.

volkswagen.co.uk/abo…318

In the United States, all emissions related equipment bolted onto engines comes with a mandatory 8 year / 80,000 mile warranty from the dealer, however over here we have no such luxury.

So, personally, I wouldn't be using a diesel car if your preferred speed is 30mph, or you drive on roads where 30mph limits are the norm.



Edited by: "bargainhunter73" 27th May 2014

Terrible cars

justicesj

1.7 litre engine for a diesel!! im with crazycyp on this one. You need … 1.7 litre engine for a diesel!! im with crazycyp on this one. You need more power to stay at 30mph on a slight incline!! With 5 occupants, this will struggle.



Its not so much about the engine size , surely its about the torque and engine produces ?

bargainhunter73

If most of your Journeys are at 30mph then you really shouldn't be … If most of your Journeys are at 30mph then you really shouldn't be considering a MODERN diesel car. New diesels have DPF (diesel particulate filters) which require regular journeys at Dual Carriageway / Motorway speeds in order to clean (regenerate) themselves. Because of the soot particles which diesel cars emit, DPF's do block fairly quickly and these regeneration cycles are required at roughly 300 - 700 mile intervals (depending on model, driving style and the DPF design). A regeneration can only take place with a high exhaust temperature and takes upto 20 - 25 minutes on some models to complete - therefore cars which aren't frequently driven for long enough journeys, in order to get the exhaust to a high enough temperature, on trips less than 25 minutes at highway speeds will potentially never get the opportunity to go through their programmed regeneration cycle.So, If you use mainly cars for city driving / school / shopping runs or heavy traffic stop - start commutes then expect problems farther down the line, expensive problems because the DPF won't be able to regenerate resulting in it becoming blocked to the point where it cannot function, and the engine management light illuminating. Should this happen, and the DPF be at a stage where it is too blocked to clean itself, then a dealer forced regeneration costs £100 - £200 a time, if that fails then you will be back on here moaning that you have just had a bill for £1000+ to replace the DPF, and it isn't covered under warranty. Google it, because this happens more often than most people would like, and the cost a replacement quickly negates the savings made by diesel economy.So city driving / school runs / under 12k miles a year / little motorway / dual carriageway travel - Get a petrol or an older diesel12k+ miles per year / regular motorway travel / long daily commutes - You will be fine with a modern dieselDon't just take my word for it or think that its rare, google 'DPF Problems" "Dpf blocked" or "Dpf warning light" to find hundreds of examples of owners who have made the same expensive mistakes.The whole DPF issue has also been covered pretty extensively in the press, the problem is real, and the advice should be heeded..http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/cars/article-2332107/Petrol-vs-diesel-cars-Drivers-warned-diesel-filter-trap.htmlhttp://www.whatcar.com/car-news/honda-cr-v-diesel-particulate-filter-warning-light-problem/1230916http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2056574/Motorist-told-45-000-Jaguar-keeps-breaking-driving-FAST-enough.htmlEven VW state openly that you should discuss your driving patterns and style with the dealer before buying a diesel car, in order for the dealer to assess the suitability of your intended vehicle use with the requirements of the on board DPF system.http://www.volkswagen.co.uk/about-us/news/318In the United States, all emissions related equipment bolted onto engines comes with a mandatory 8 year / 80,000 mile warranty from the dealer, however over here we have no such luxury.So, personally, I wouldn't be using a diesel car if your preferred speed is 30mph, or you drive on roads where 30mph limits are the norm.



I had an audi A3 with a DPF fitted....pain the ass if you don't hit a dual carriage way once a week, and burn out the soot from the DPF. if you intend in driving around 70-80% in the town, then get a petrol. Cannot comment on the car, but I guess its alot of car for the price, but as ever do check re-sale values as well.

Chick21

Problems on the Australian … Problems on the Australian model:http://www.caradvice.com.au/287677/hyundai-ix35-recalled-32525-small-suvs-with-airbag-fault/



Cars get recalled all the time for things like this, the father in laws Mercedes is constantly getting recalled. I don't see why it's an issue

Ballard

Terrible cars



Mine was very good, until someone drove into the back of it whilst I was stationary and wrote it off. I got out without a scratch, so they are safe too. It also carried four adults with bikes on the roof and drove ok, didn't struggle at all so any comments about more power just show ignorance, torque is ok on these engines.

For this price this is a great deal, have some great op.

COLD. Hyundai are not honouring their warranties.

Ballard

Terrible cars



Thanks. That's cleared up any doubts I had about the car.(_;)

Heat OP for a good deal for a decent car.
Whatcar review
Edited by: "Groaver" 27th May 2014

Its a diesel so will emit three times more dangerous particulates than a petrol engined car (co2 emissions may be slightly lower but they are not dangerous). EU should look into only allowing diesels in utility vehicles like vans and lorries
Edited by: "lumsdot" 27th May 2014

lumsdot

Its a diesel so will emit three times more dangerous particulates than a … Its a diesel so will emit three times more dangerous particulates than a petrol engined car (co2 emissions may be slightly lower but they are not dangerous). EU should look into only allowing diesels in utility vehicles like vans and lorries



CO2 is not dangerous? Seriously?

Euro 5 and 6 particulate emission limits are equal for diesel and petrol cars.

lumsdot

Its a diesel so will emit three times more dangerous particulates than a … Its a diesel so will emit three times more dangerous particulates than a petrol engined car (co2 emissions may be slightly lower but they are not dangerous). EU should look into only allowing diesels in utility vehicles like vans and lorries

co2 isn't dangerous? Give your head a wobble

Given one of these whilst Hyundai i800 was having it's annual service. Very impressed and no problem with power, also less polluting than my 2.5 litre engine.

pghstochaj

CO2 is not dangerous? Seriously?Euro 5 and 6 particulate emission limits … CO2 is not dangerous? Seriously?Euro 5 and 6 particulate emission limits are equal for diesel and petrol cars.



Co2 is a naturally occurring gas , global warming is another issue and the small perc less co2 emitted by diesels will make sod all difference.

Exhaust particulates do kill , i.e lung problems, cancers, etc, our cities and towns are polluted with exhaust fumes,
A study in a paper recently found that modern diesels do on average emit many times more particulates, plus sometimes the DPF filters will dump in town at low speed and not on the motorway as they are supposed to.

Banned

justicesj

1.7 litre engine for a diesel!! im with crazycyp on this one. You need … 1.7 litre engine for a diesel!! im with crazycyp on this one. You need more power to stay at 30mph on a slight incline!! With 5 occupants, this will struggle.



Utter nonsense.

bargainhunter73

If most of your Journeys are at 30mph then you really shouldn't be … If most of your Journeys are at 30mph then you really shouldn't be considering a MODERN diesel car. New diesels have DPF (diesel particulate filters) which require regular journeys at Dual Carriageway / Motorway speeds in order to clean (regenerate) themselves. Because of the soot particles which diesel cars emit, DPF's do block fairly quickly and these regeneration cycles are required at roughly 300 - 700 mile intervals (depending on model, driving style and the DPF design). A regeneration can only take place with a high exhaust temperature and takes upto 20 - 25 minutes on some models to complete - therefore cars which aren't frequently driven for long enough journeys, in order to get the exhaust to a high enough temperature, on trips less than 25 minutes at highway speeds will potentially never get the opportunity to go through their programmed regeneration cycle.So, If you use mainly cars for city driving / school / shopping runs or heavy traffic stop - start commutes then expect problems farther down the line, expensive problems because the DPF won't be able to regenerate resulting in it becoming blocked to the point where it cannot function, and the engine management light illuminating. Should this happen, and the DPF be at a stage where it is too blocked to clean itself, then a dealer forced regeneration costs £100 - £200 a time, if that fails then you will be back on here moaning that you have just had a bill for £1000+ to replace the DPF, and it isn't covered under warranty. Google it, because this happens more often than most people would like, and the cost a replacement quickly negates the savings made by diesel economy.So city driving / school runs / under 12k miles a year / little motorway / dual carriageway travel - Get a petrol or an older diesel12k+ miles per year / regular motorway travel / long daily commutes - You will be fine with a modern dieselDon't just take my word for it or think that its rare, google 'DPF Problems" "Dpf blocked" or "Dpf warning light" to find hundreds of examples of owners who have made the same expensive mistakes.The whole DPF issue has also been covered pretty extensively in the press, the problem is real, and the advice should be heeded..http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/cars/article-2332107/Petrol-vs-diesel-cars-Drivers-warned-diesel-filter-trap.htmlhttp://www.whatcar.com/car-news/honda-cr-v-diesel-particulate-filter-warning-light-problem/1230916http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2056574/Motorist-told-45-000-Jaguar-keeps-breaking-driving-FAST-enough.htmlEven VW state openly that you should discuss your driving patterns and style with the dealer before buying a diesel car, in order for the dealer to assess the suitability of your intended vehicle use with the requirements of the on board DPF system.http://www.volkswagen.co.uk/about-us/news/318In the United States, all emissions related equipment bolted onto engines comes with a mandatory 8 year / 80,000 mile warranty from the dealer, however over here we have no such luxury.So, personally, I wouldn't be using a diesel car if your preferred speed is 30mph, or you drive on roads where 30mph limits are the norm.



The Hyundai forces a DPF regen every 300 miles or so. As such I wouldn't worry too much about the issues surrounding DPF on these cars - of course you are right that if you are mainly doing town driving, a diesel wouldn't suit anyway.

Note that the DPF regen absolutely kills your MPG. 48 combined advertised, I would suspect you will be lucky to get 35.

trixabel

Utter nonsense.



Agreed. Probably thinking of 20 year old diesel engines! 1.7 is actually bigger than normal for this size of car these days - most Qashqais have 1.5 dci.

lumsdot

Co2 is a naturally occurring gas , global warming is another issue and … Co2 is a naturally occurring gas , global warming is another issue and the small perc less co2 emitted by diesels will make sod all difference.Exhaust particulates do kill , i.e lung problems, cancers, etc, our cities and towns are polluted with exhaust fumes,A study in a paper recently found that modern diesels do on average emit many times more particulates, plus sometimes the DPF filters will dump in town at low speed and not on the motorway as they are supposed to.



A Euro V diesel engine will typically emit 0.001 g/km versus a limit of 0.005 g/km. What does your average petrol achieve? Why not look at something like this from TUV Nord:

transportenvironment.org/sit…pdf

I suggest you extend your research somewhat and consider like for like, i.e. a car that you can buy new today, not a 15 year old indirect injection diesel versus a 15 year old petrol car. For example:

ft.com/cms…tml

The issue is that CO2 emissions are a big problem, so reducing them is a good idea. Euro V/VI engine emissions are tightly regulated and DPFs have been installed on diesel cars which bring their particulate levels down to below petrol engines.

Petrol has a lot of catching up to do.

seazach

COLD. Hyundai are not honouring their warranties.



Explain?

Diesels still a good decade behind petrols. Well actually the old diesels were brilliant, incredibly reliable ran for a million miles, but thanks to the EU this is now a distant memory. You can get 1.0 petrol engines putting out over 100 BHP - infact Daihatu managed this 30 years ago in their charage gti. Sure you get (slightly) more MPG when the engine has warmed up, but they're a lot more complicated. All you need is the DMF failing, EGR valve or DPF blocking and all the cash you've saved you'll soon lose. The warranty won't cover the EGR or DPF and they won't cover clutches, the i10 has been known to go through clutches in less than 20k and hyundai not been helpful.




Edited by: "jaydeeuk1" 27th May 2014

I have one of these and regularly give 48-50 mpg. Good car and no problems with power.

jaydeeuk1

Diesels still a good decade behind petrols. You can get 1.0 petrol … Diesels still a good decade behind petrols. You can get 1.0 petrol engines putting out over 100 BHP - infact Daihatus managed this 30 years ago. Sure you get (slightly) more MPG when the engine has warmed up, but they're a lot more complicated. All you need is the DMF failing, EGR valve of DPF blocking and all the cash you've saved you'll soon lose.



Quite a lot more MPG to be fair. I have a diesel Hyundai and the petrol equivalent is only 60% as efficient with regards MPG. OK, diesel prices are slightly higher, but this still translates to a £100 a month saving on fuel!

Diesels are a bit more fun to drive (in my personal opinion) in the real world as well, given the much increased low rev torque compared to a petrol. Sure a petrol is still a purists car to drive, but I love my diesel and wouldn't go back to a low torque/low rev petrol.

They arent as complex as they used to be, and as long as you don't try and drive a diesel like a petrol, you wont have too many issues to be fair.

jaydeeuk1

The warranty won't cover the EGR or DPF and they won't cover clutches, … The warranty won't cover the EGR or DPF and they won't cover clutches, the i10 has been known to go through clutches in less than 20k and hyundai not been helpful.



That's a very misleading statement. Saying that there have been clutch issues that Hyundai havent necessarily dealt with properly does NOT mean that they do not, and their warranty does not, cover clutches - it absolutely does, although as per any "consumable" item (which a clutch is past certain mileages) a warranty claim will be on its own individual merit.

The clutch issues you refer to by the way are on a completely different car, and indeed an older model of the car you refer to.

pghstochaj

A Euro V diesel engine will typically emit 0.001 g/km versus a limit of … A Euro V diesel engine will typically emit 0.001 g/km versus a limit of 0.005 g/km. What does your average petrol achieve? Why not look at something like this from TUV Nord:http://www.transportenvironment.org/sites/te/files/publications/TUV-Technical_report.pdfI suggest you extend your research somewhat and consider like for like, i.e. a car that you can buy new today, not a 15 year old indirect injection diesel versus a 15 year old petrol car. For example:http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/60b7cc8c-56b2-11e3-ab12-00144feabdc0.html#axzz32uE4eweJThe issue is that CO2 emissions are a big problem, so reducing them is a good idea. Euro V/VI engine emissions are tightly regulated and DPFs have been installed on diesel cars which bring their particulate levels down to below petrol engines.Petrol has a lot of catching up to do.



Boris wants to tax diesels more in London to cut pollution Your text here see quote below

If the DPF filter is working then maybe particulates are low, but the fact is DPF will not work when driven at 20 in a town center


Diesels emit the bulk of emissions that endanger health, with cars the main offender, according to figures released by the London Mayor’s office. The figures show cars including private-hire taxis contributed to 39 percent of smog-forming nitrogen dioxide (NO2), 28 percent of related oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and 54 percent of PM10 particulate matter.
The London Mayor’s office wants the Government to help reduced this by penalising diesels both old and new via the VED tax system. “We want a tax weighting on diesels. Over time it would retrospective,” Pencharz said. “We want to see bit less diesel and a bit more petrol.”

Best price yet even beating drive the deal provided you are the 1st registered owner etc, have been looking at the se and se sat nav version and still the best price I've seen yet.

Banned

this car would be much more desirable at £10,000

lumsdot

Boris wants to tax diesels more in London to cut pollution Your text here … Boris wants to tax diesels more in London to cut pollution Your text here see quote belowIf the DPF filter is working then maybe particulates are low, but the fact is DPF will not work when driven at 20 in a town centerDiesels emit the bulk of emissions that endanger health, with cars the main offender, according to figures released by the London Mayor’s office. The figures show cars including private-hire taxis contributed to 39 percent of smog-forming nitrogen dioxide (NO2), 28 percent of related oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and 54 percent of PM10 particulate matter.The London Mayor’s office wants the Government to help reduced this by penalising diesels both old and new via the VED tax system. “We want a tax weighting on diesels. Over time it would retrospective,” Pencharz said. “We want to see bit less diesel and a bit more petrol.”



The DPF is designed to work in a city centre, it is then designed to burn off the collected particulates at high temperature and high speed once away from built up areas. If a driver never leaves the city centre then a diesel is not for them, clearly.

Not sure why Boris is a quoted reference on a scientific/engineering subject. Can you please be clear, with evidence, why a Euro V petrol engine is better with respect to particulates than a diesel engine (that means with real numbers, not bad quotes from Boris). To be clear:

The emission limits are the same.
A diesel will generally achieve 1/5th of the limit according to MOT data.
I have provided evidence to show that a petrol car has higher typical PM10 results than typically achieved by a diesel with a particulate filter.

THe problem is that a lot of your information is based on old diesels. This car in question is a Euro V engine.

crazycyp

more power?



[img]encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQZcQB8ZMHFh47SJMFnlifVo-RDHPVRV2895-L5HjAoKU6UzpHOTQ[/img]
crazycyp

more power?




More FARRAH?
Edited by: "gcmarcal" 27th May 2014

I am not sure they are a good decade behind, they are probably about equal now after diesel caught up since the introduction of common rail injection. I would agree that reliability is an issue, but newer petrols have DMFs and have very complex injection systems/variable cam timing etc. which introduces new issues too.

Not sure why bhp/litre is relevant to anything - who would buy a car on bhp/litre? Surely you buy it on useful things such as bhp for a given fuel consumption, or a reliability. I would much rather have my twin turbo 3 litre 6 cylinder engine "only" producing 286 bhp (i.e. 95 bhp/litre) than a VAG 1.4 180 bhp engine producing 128 bhp/litre. Should we all buy cars based on torque/litre? Thought not.

jaydeeuk1

Diesels still a good decade behind petrols. Well actually the old diesels … Diesels still a good decade behind petrols. Well actually the old diesels were brilliant, incredibly reliable ran for a million miles, but thanks to the EU this is now a distant memory. You can get 1.0 petrol engines putting out over 100 BHP - infact Daihatu managed this 30 years ago in their charage gti. Sure you get (slightly) more MPG when the engine has warmed up, but they're a lot more complicated. All you need is the DMF failing, EGR valve or DPF blocking and all the cash you've saved you'll soon lose. The warranty won't cover the EGR or DPF and they won't cover clutches, the i10 has been known to go through clutches in less than 20k and hyundai not been helpful.


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