Igenix IG9807 Portable Desiccant Dehumidifier with Ioniser and Silver Filter, 7 Litre £109.99 @ Amazon
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Igenix IG9807 Portable Desiccant Dehumidifier with Ioniser and Silver Filter, 7 Litre £109.99 @ Amazon

£109.99Amazon Deals
12
Found 3rd Dec
Good price for desiccant dehumidifier.

  • Desiccant




    dehumidifiers are smaller, lighter, quieter and more efficient to run than a compressor driven dehumidifier
  • Ability to operate in low temperatures and is ideally suited for use indoors and outdoors within a garage or outbuilding
  • Normal dry and quick dry modes plus auto and eco power saving modes
  • Silver Nano filter kills bacteria on contact, improving the quality of air in your home or office
  • Automatic shut-off once water tank is full, plus tip-over cut-out for added safety

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12 Comments

Desiccant dehumidifiers are smaller, lighter, quieter and more efficient to run than a compressor driven dehumidifier

That's not true surely? Oddly the Power / Wattage is quoted as 230W, yet the description says 630W of power.

Stompa9 m ago

Desiccant dehumidifiers are smaller, lighter, quieter and more efficient …Desiccant dehumidifiers are smaller, lighter, quieter and more efficient to run than a compressor driven dehumidifierThat's not true surely? Oddly the Power / Wattage is quoted as 230W, yet the description says 630W of power.



The wattage difference is probably normal mode vs top mode I would guess.

Where is the extra £6 promotion mentioned?

Raider00013 h, 59 m ago

The wattage difference is probably normal mode vs top mode I would guess.


Desiccant dehumidifiers use considerably more power than compressor types. Overall consumption is little between the two at the end of the day though as they are a bit quicker. This 7L/day one isn't exactly blistering performance though. My desiccant one is 8L/day and I didn't' think there were any less than that!

LOL it will remove 7L of water per day, but the tank is only 3L !

Thoughtful3 h, 59 m ago

LOL it will remove 7L of water per day, but the tank is only 3L !


Not sure why that is funny.

If you are actually removing 7l a day you probably need a plumber not a dehumidifier.

Remember as well that the the litres per day is not directly equivalent between a desiccant and a compresser dehumidifier. They are performed under different test conditions. So 7l per day is the equivalent to between 16 and 20l per day using a compressor dehumidifier.

And although they are higher wattage I think that in general they have a higher extraction rate, especially as the humidity drops, so they should not be running as often to maintain the required humidity.
Edited by: "itsjustme" 3rd Dec

itsjustme27 m ago

Not sure why that is funny. If you are actually removing 7l a day you …Not sure why that is funny. If you are actually removing 7l a day you probably need a plumber not a dehumidifier.Remember as well that the the litres per day is not directly equivalent between a desiccant and a compresser dehumidifier. They are performed under different test conditions. So 7l per day is the equivalent to between 16 and 20l per day using a compressor dehumidifier.And although they are higher wattage I think that in general they have a higher extraction rate, especially as the humidity drops, so they should not be running as often to maintain the required humidity.


Wild!

Where do you get that information from?

nihcaj50 m ago

Wild!Where do you get that information from?


It's hard to find the info, it's largely picked up from various places. So you don't have to believe me. Meaco have quite an interesting info page which is one of the first that comes up if you Google a comparison.

But if you look at the stats all compressor dehumidifiers at tested at 85% and 30C while dessicants are tested at 60% and 20C. So it's in no way a direct comparison.

I have one of these. It's a decent machine. I wouldn't say it's particularly quiet though. Certainly not compared to an old Toshiba Dry Mini compressor.

itsjustme13 h, 3 m ago

It's hard to find the info, it's largely picked up from various places. So …It's hard to find the info, it's largely picked up from various places. So you don't have to believe me. Meaco have quite an interesting info page which is one of the first that comes up if you Google a comparison.But if you look at the stats all compressor dehumidifiers at tested at 85% and 30C while dessicants are tested at 60% and 20C. So it's in no way a direct comparison.


You are just making your own judgement on figures from very different sources - desiccant manufacturers hype theirs up and so do compressor makers! in practice, the difference between the two types is minimal at normal heated home temperatures, and to be honest I could not tell you which way it swings. At the beginning of the season, they both produce loads of water, then it settles down to smaller amounts. The compressor type takes longer but works fine, the desiccant does it quicker, but comparatively speaking guzzles the juice. (630W compared to about 250 in my case) I might be reluctant to replace the desiccant one, and would probably opt for another compressor type for that reason, but the cheapest compressor types are VERY noisy, so it would need to be another Ebac one.

Where the desiccant one comes into its own is if you need to dry a room out quickly (eg. building work or a spillage) - they get the water out a bit quicker, but in practical use, you set the machine and just set it to run, and either type does the job as well as the other. You will need to empty the Desiccant container more as they tend to be very small.

(Oh, the desiccant one had to be replaced as it conked out in a week or so, the compressor ones I have had in the past lasted years!)
Edited by: "nihcaj" 4th Dec

I believe you largely just rephrased what I said. There isn't any hugely reliable sources that I can find but I suggested Meaco's advice who manufacture both types and agree with the numbers I gave.

The conditions they are tested under is not something I've made up either. You can find the information on any manual. And I know which are tested under more realistic conditions for most households.

And all I was trying to say was that I don't think there is going to be a huge difference in energy usage between the two in your average house hold conditions. And because compressors relay on condensation both reduction in temperature and reduction in humidity have greater effects on their ability to remove water than they do on the process of dessicantion.
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