Intex K2 Challenger Kayak 2 Man Inflatable Canoe with Oars #68306, £64.83 From Amazon
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Intex K2 Challenger Kayak 2 Man Inflatable Canoe with Oars #68306, £64.83 From Amazon

31
Found 23rd May 2016
Boyf was interested in the other Intex kayak deal, apparently this one is longer, not as high, has a keel, has the netting in the front to put your gear in?

Inflated size 351cm x 76cm x 38cm
Includes a high-output pump and 84" aluminium oars
Capacity 2 persons maximum weight 160kgs (350lbs)
TUV approved ISO 6185-1 "Inflatable Boats"
Rugged vinyl construction

This item's packaging will indicate what is inside. To cover it, select Dispatch in Amazon box on the checkout page.
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Includes a high-output pump and 84" aluminium oars
Capacity 2 persons maximum weight 160kgs (350lbs)
TUV approved ISO 6185-1 "Inflatable Boats"
Rugged vinyl construction

Amazon reviews, sorted Most Recent: amazon.co.uk/Int…ent

On Argos for £149.99 currently, worth a look to read reviews, Q&As argos.co.uk/sta…htm

The Explorer K2 is £124.99 on Argos, though I'm no expert on kayaks and their pricing! argos.co.uk/sta…htm

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Edited by: "louiselouise" 23rd May 2016
superb find, massive heat from me.
Technically they are paddles not oars
Tomosa

Technically they are paddles not oars



Technically they are paddles not oars

I would tell boyf to sign in and Like it, but he agrees with you, so I'll do it on his behalf
These things are ok if used a maximum of 20 metres from the shore on a calm day with no wind. Otherwise you'll be seeing a lifeguard later that day.
rosstheboss1972

These things are ok if used a maximum of 20 metres from the shore on a … These things are ok if used a maximum of 20 metres from the shore on a calm day with no wind. Otherwise you'll be seeing a lifeguard later that day.



​can be used on canals and rivers (with licence of course (_;))
So which one is better? The Explorer looks more sturdy for choppy water

I would tell boyf to sign in and Like it, but he agrees with you, so I'll … I would tell boyf to sign in and Like it, but he agrees with you, so I'll do it on his behalf


Oh so he's a 'rower' too, is he?

These things are ok if used a maximum of 20 metres from the shore on a … These things are ok if used a maximum of 20 metres from the shore on a calm day with no wind. Otherwise you'll be seeing a lifeguard later that day.



If you're using this on/by the beach the sea isn't going to take you further out is it?

If you're using this on/by the beach the sea isn't going to take you … If you're using this on/by the beach the sea isn't going to take you further out is it?



I'm no nautical expert but surely if you are using it ON the beach, I'm guessing you're in no danger of being swept out to Calais.

I'm no nautical expert but surely if you are using it ON the beach, I'm … I'm no nautical expert but surely if you are using it ON the beach, I'm guessing you're in no danger of being swept out to Calais.



Yeah I think you're right. Not really a danger of tsunami's here.


If you're using this at the sea side, the sea isn't going to take you further out is it?

Better?

If you're using this on/by the beach the sea isn't going to take you … If you're using this on/by the beach the sea isn't going to take you further out is it?



If you're having to ask a question like that you should stay well clear of this thing. I mean come on, you know what a rip tide is.

If you're having to ask a question like that you should stay well clear … If you're having to ask a question like that you should stay well clear of this thing. I mean come on, you know what a rip tide is.



A bit of a snooty comment.

It's not my area of expertise so I don't know a lot but my understanding is that rip tides are unlikely to be seen at the sea side and if they are then they should subside after taking you out a bit. Although if you do get caught in one then I hear paddling diagonally back to shore should work.

A bit of a snooty comment.It's not my area of expertise so I don't know a … A bit of a snooty comment.It's not my area of expertise so I don't know a lot but my understanding is that rip tides are unlikely to be seen at the sea side and if they are then they should subside after taking you out a bit. Although if you do get caught in one then I hear paddling diagonally back to shore should work.



It's not being snooty at all, it's being serious. It's not my area of expertise either. It's just that you need to take this very seriously, not just fob it off as unlikely. If you get caught in a rip the likelihood of you dying without help and if you start to panic is pretty high. Don't take risks with your life, it's good that you're questioning it I guess, my concern is that you don't seem to be taking it very seriously.
Edited by: "sotomonkey" 24th May 2016

It's not being snooty at all, it's being serious. It's not my area of … It's not being snooty at all, it's being serious. It's not my area of expertise either. It's just that you need to take this very seriously, not just fob it off as unlikely. If you get caught in a rip the likelihood of you dying without help and if you start to panic is pretty high. Don't take risks with your life, it's good that you're questioning it I guess, my concern is that you don't seem to be taking it very seriously.



So should I not use this Kayak?
I'm confused.
I suppose if I never go in the water I'll never encounter a rip tide and therefore never risk drowning.
I'm just not sure what I'm supposed to take away from your comment.
Be careful. I respect the sea and don't take its power lightly.
Stay calm. Yes I will. As long as I have a buoyancy aid I should be fine. Else it'll be backstroke along the cost until I'm free of the riptide.

Anyway, no problem, I could always refuse delivery tomorrow.
Probably sleep on it.

Thanks.
Ive had one of these (the single seat version) and have used it on lakes and rivers all over north wales and on some pretty choppy waters. It's absolutely brilliant but I would ALWAYS wear a life vest with it as I imagine there is always a risk of catastrophic failure. My girlfriend and I were only meters away from a guy who drowned on Bala when he fell out of an inflatable without a life vest... So if this doesn't make you respect the dangers then nothing will. But please don't be put off, they really are good fun. Just remember to stay safe!
dailypost.co.uk/new…823

So should I not use this Kayak? I'm confused. I suppose if I never go in … So should I not use this Kayak? I'm confused. I suppose if I never go in the water I'll never encounter a rip tide and therefore never risk drowning.I'm just not sure what I'm supposed to take away from your comment. Be careful. I respect the sea and don't take its power lightly. Stay calm. Yes I will. As long as I have a buoyancy aid I should be fine. Else it'll be backstroke along the cost until I'm free of the riptide. Anyway, no problem, I could always refuse delivery tomorrow.Probably sleep on it. Thanks.



There's no reason why this type of boat is any more dangerous than any other, so long as you wear the correct equipment (buoyancy aid is a must) and consider the risks. Rip currents are not particular dangerous so long as you're in your boat, being on the surface in a floating device is a whole lot better than swimming in one.

I've done a lot of sea canoeing and never once come across a rip current of any impact, I wouldn't take an inflatable kayak out in anything but calm conditions, where the risk should be minimal and it will be a lot of fun.

mike
We've got the yellow one, use it in the sea on the south coast and it's really sturdy. Hope that helps.
Just for clarity its worth clearing up what a bouyancy aid is and what a life vest is as people continually say you need one or the other without mentioning the difference.

A life vest will hold your head out of the water so even if your unconscious your airways will be clear of the water (assuming you put it on correctly in the first place).
Bouyancy aid is purely to provide additional floatation assistance.

If you can swim well then a bouyancy aid is the better choice for kayaking as its not going to get in the way.
If anyone is after the single seater:

charliesdirect.co.uk/int…wcB

Initially I thought about just buying the two seater and taking it out alone when nobody else wants to go. But reading a few reviews, that doesn't work too well. The weight distribution is too far off. So I've been selfish and bought the single seater
blow up kayaks/canoes are more susceptible to being blown off course than normal yaks/canoes. Mix an offshore wind, a strong tide and you'll really struggle to get back to shore. best used in lakes and canals as mentioned previously.
I'm sure it's horses for courses, but for a parent and child on a canal or lake, would the Challenger or Explorer be better?

I'm sure it's horses for courses, but for a parent and child on a canal … I'm sure it's horses for courses, but for a parent and child on a canal or lake, would the Challenger or Explorer be better?



From the reviews probably the Explorer.

I went for the Challenger as I prefer its looks.

Ensure you get the right safety gear for the child.
I bought one of the yellow ones for £60 from a deal on here last year, this reminded me I'd still got it so stuck it on Gumtree and got £50 for it. I'm looking for a solid one seater now.

​can be used on canals and rivers (with licence of course (_;))


Unless you are in Scotland where you can paddle almost anywhere you fancy. Though wear a bouyancy aid.
K1LLER HORNET

A bit of a snooty comment.It's not my area of expertise so I don't know a … A bit of a snooty comment.It's not my area of expertise so I don't know a lot but my understanding is that rip tides are unlikely to be seen at the sea side and if they are then they should subside after taking you out a bit. Although if you do get caught in one then I hear paddling diagonally back to shore should work.



​I think wind is the key factor with this. A fair offshore wind can make it more difficult to paddle in.
Ridgehead

From the reviews probably the Explorer.I went for the Challenger as I … From the reviews probably the Explorer.I went for the Challenger as I prefer its looks.Ensure you get the right safety gear for the child.



As I own both challenger and explorer now I can confirm the Explorer is the better one. Reasons:

Challenger feels less stable
Challenger doesnt have a drain bung so you have to climb into the ends to dry the nooks and crannies out.
Challenger has a better design on the fixing for the skeg but performs the same as Explorer
Having now used the K2 down a tidal river with someone in a 'proper' kayak I have now decided I need a proper kayak.
That said, it was a harsh test as it was also a bit blowy, and a proper kayak is a lot more expensive. For the money it's a cheap way of trying kayaking and if you like it in an inflatable you will love it in a proper kayak.
K1LLER HORNET

So should I not use this Kayak? I'm confused. I suppose if I never go in … So should I not use this Kayak? I'm confused. I suppose if I never go in the water I'll never encounter a rip tide and therefore never risk drowning.I'm just not sure what I'm supposed to take away from your comment. Be careful. I respect the sea and don't take its power lightly. Stay calm. Yes I will. As long as I have a buoyancy aid I should be fine. Else it'll be backstroke along the cost until I'm free of the riptide. Anyway, no problem, I could always refuse delivery tomorrow.Probably sleep on it. Thanks.



​Was it comfortable?
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