Isle of Jura Superstition lightly peated whisky - £23.79 @ Morrisons
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Isle of Jura Superstition lightly peated whisky - £23.79 @ Morrisons

25
Found 12th Feb 2013
Good price for this whisky.This is not the cheaper Jura 10YO before anyone says they got it for £15 and votes cold.
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25 Comments
Does lightly peated mean they have added soil?
Good find. Superstition is a really nice drop.

Heated, thanks op.
therudders

Does lightly peated mean they have added soil?



It generally means that it smells and tastes like diesel. However, this one is not bad at all.

Great price, love this stuff.
Is this the cheaper 10YO I got for £15?
70cl or ? Any idea
ranandg

70cl or ? Any idea

70cl
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n113/Doonhamer_2006/2013-02-12184027.jpg[/img]
Not for there English ©
superflyguy

Is this the cheaper 10YO I got for £15?



You got a 10 year old for £15?

Saville would be proud.
therudders

Does lightly peated mean they have added soil?



They burn the peat to dry out and smoke the malted barley. Peat is a useful fuel source as well as imparting a smoky flavour to the whisky.

Good deal, cheapest I have seen this for a while (bought a bottle for £25 in October) and a nice whisky if you like the slightly peaty stuff, it is not too heavy.
Tasty! heat added
hot- goes down nicely.
Probably the nicest of all the Juras, really good price too. Hot.
prefer the 10YO but this is still very nice and a good price
Heat added, Antons favourite beverage!
Epic drop! Heat added
adam106

They burn the peat to dry out and smoke the malted barley. Peat is a … They burn the peat to dry out and smoke the malted barley. Peat is a useful fuel source as well as imparting a smoky flavour to the whisky.Good deal, cheapest I have seen this for a while (bought a bottle for £25 in October) and a nice whisky if you like the slightly peaty stuff, it is not too heavy.



Very informative, many thanks
adam106

They burn the peat to dry out and smoke the malted barley. Peat is a … They burn the peat to dry out and smoke the malted barley. Peat is a useful fuel source as well as imparting a smoky flavour to the whisky.Good deal, cheapest I have seen this for a while (bought a bottle for £25 in October) and a nice whisky if you like the slightly peaty stuff, it is not too heavy.


Burning peat is also really environmentally unsustainable - peat takes thousands of years to form, and when it's burned or disturbed it releases tons of stored Carbon dioxide into the atmosphere (it actually contributes to global warming / climate change!). A reason I'd avoid stuff that uses peat, including this and certain types of store bought compost.
Edited by: "Crapweasel" 13th Feb 2013
adam106

They burn the peat to dry out and smoke the malted barley. Peat is a … They burn the peat to dry out and smoke the malted barley. Peat is a useful fuel source as well as imparting a smoky flavour to the whisky.Good deal, cheapest I have seen this for a while (bought a bottle for £25 in October) and a nice whisky if you like the slightly peaty stuff, it is not too heavy.



Isn't there some input from the water they use that has traveled through peat out in 'the environment'?
jaydeeuk1

Probably the nicest of all the Juras, really good price too. Hot.



Nicer than the Jura 16year old? Which has to be one of the nicest whiskeys i have ever had.
I personally cant drink peated whisky, to me its an acquired taste
Iconcur

I personally cant drink peated whisky, to me its an acquired taste


This is a great one to start with
stevie wonders favourite whisky
Crapweasel

Burning peat is also really environmentally unsustainable - peat takes … Burning peat is also really environmentally unsustainable - peat takes thousands of years to form, and when it's burned or disturbed it releases tons of stored Carbon dioxide into the atmosphere (it actually contributes to global warming / climate change!). A reason I'd avoid stuff that uses peat, including this and certain types of store bought compost.



I did read somewhere that the amount they use for whisky making is small enough that it can regrow enough to make up for this, but I don't remember where I read it and I can't find it again now, so not sure about this one. Although its probably worth noting that the barley needs to be dried out in some way, so another fuel source would be used if not peat, although while not entirely environmentally friendly this may be more so than peat.

Meathotukdeals

Isn't there some input from the water they use that has traveled through … Isn't there some input from the water they use that has traveled through peat out in 'the environment'?



I believe it is minuscule compared to burning peat.
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