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Java Programming: Complete Beginner to Advanced - Free with Code @ Udemy
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Java Programming: Complete Beginner to Advanced - Free with Code @ Udemy

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Posted 15th Feb

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In case you wanted to pick up some Java computing skills you can get some help here with the well reviewed Udemy course that can be picked up for free using the Get Deal or if not, then as usual add the course to cart and apply the code F63B95B2DCCB702C329D as below :

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Rating 4.3 (726 ratings)
Students Enrolled 52,199

Description
Java is one of the most popular programming languages used to create Web applications and platforms. It was designed for flexibility, allowing developers to write code that would run on any machine.

So it’s your time now to take advantage of a loads of jobs and freelance opportunities that are available for java programmers out there.

This course is provided by CodeIn Academy Instructors who are Oracle Certified professionals with many years’ experience in java programming

The course is very comprehensive and will be constantly updated. Once you have gone through this course you will be able to understand Java 8 features very easily. So, this course covers each topic in details and is focused to break down topics with simplified examples. Thus, it is for anyone who wants to learn java programming and no previous programming experience is required.

Hope it helps someone.
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Happy to help anyone with any questions or queries about things they’re just not ‘getting’.

20 years experience now (sigh!)

dean.pullen AT gmail.com or ping me on LinkedIn
13 Comments
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I did this course last week and it's ok. The tutor's voice is slightly annoying and in total it took about 2 hours to complete. I do have some previous coding skills so for me it was more to find out the different syntax and using eclipse IDE. Something to do this weekend if storm Dennis arrives
Happy to help anyone with any questions or queries about things they’re just not ‘getting’.

20 years experience now (sigh!)

dean.pullen AT gmail.com or ping me on LinkedIn
mark_wardbbY15/02/2020 08:49

I did this course last week and it's ok. The tutor's voice is slightly …I did this course last week and it's ok. The tutor's voice is slightly annoying and in total it took about 2 hours to complete. I do have some previous coding skills so for me it was more to find out the different syntax and using eclipse IDE. Something to do this weekend if storm Dennis arrives


Try using IntelliJ if you haven’t already.
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deanpullen15/02/2020 09:09

Happy to help anyone with any questions or queries about things they’re j …Happy to help anyone with any questions or queries about things they’re just not ‘getting’. 20 years experience now (sigh!)dean.pullen AT gmail.com or ping me on LinkedIn



Can you explain in a sentence OOP

I think the biggest problem with coding is putting it all together. Variables, loops ect are easy to comprehend. Creating a project that implements everything is a bit harder. Once you geddit though you geddit. Now everything is a search on StackOverflow.

I tried to learn using Notepad++ in the 90's, not a wonder I didn't finally geddit until a year or so ago (Android developer.) Modern IDE's make things so much easier as does updates in Java.
GlentoranMark15/02/2020 11:25

Can you explain in a sentence OOP I think the biggest problem with …Can you explain in a sentence OOP I think the biggest problem with coding is putting it all together. Variables, loops ect are easy to comprehend. Creating a project that implements everything is a bit harder. Once you geddit though you geddit. Now everything is a search on StackOverflow.I tried to learn using Notepad++ in the 90's, not a wonder I didn't finally geddit until a year or so ago (Android developer.) Modern IDE's make things so much easier as does updates in Java.


I couldn’t explain OOP in a sentence, and having been working with Java for over 13 years now it’s hard to remember the learning pathway. But what I’d probably advise to people learning is learn the basics like loops (etc), learn general OOP principals (Bluejay is good for this), then move onto Design Patterns. These patterns are what provides the glue that holds things together in OOP; Dependency Injection, Factory, Entity, DAO... and once you understand those, it is natural to move on to something like Spring; after all, why reinvent the wheel? But, it’s definitely important to understand the principals of the wheel, otherwise it will remain magic!
jazlabs15/02/2020 13:27

I couldn’t explain OOP in a sentence, and having been working with Java f …I couldn’t explain OOP in a sentence, and having been working with Java for over 13 years now it’s hard to remember the learning pathway. But what I’d probably advise to people learning is learn the basics like loops (etc), learn general OOP principals (Bluejay is good for this), then move onto Design Patterns. These patterns are what provides the glue that holds things together in OOP; Dependency Injection, Factory, Entity, DAO... and once you understand those, it is natural to move on to something like Spring; after all, why reinvent the wheel? But, it’s definitely important to understand the principals of the wheel, otherwise it will remain magic!



I tried to learn OOP separate to Android and they kept talking about houses, cars and dogs. I didn't really have a clue. It was only last May when I created an app for my local football club did I really need it as I had to sort a fixture Object by a date (stored as a Long.) I had a crash course in OOP and solved my problem. After this I realised I was using Objects in all of the apps I was creating and had been working with them all along. I'm by no means an expert in OOP but I've learned by the just in time method. If I need something I'll only learn it when I need it.

I know nothing about Dependency Injection, Factory, Entity, DAO and Spring as I've never had a need for them. I have needed Sqlite, Firebase, Json ect to make apps work in the past. If I need any of the above then I'll learn them.

I keep thinking to myself I must learn Kotlin at some stage but I can get apps working perfectly fine using Java alone. While I've had a play around with the language, I've no need for it at present and I'm comfortable using Java. In fact the last 2 things I've needed (Tensorflow and Arcore) have their documentation in Java. Java is by no means dead despite what others will tell you.
GlentoranMark15/02/2020 14:40

I tried to learn OOP separate to Android and they kept talking about …I tried to learn OOP separate to Android and they kept talking about houses, cars and dogs. I didn't really have a clue. It was only last May when I created an app for my local football club did I really need it as I had to sort a fixture Object by a date (stored as a Long.) I had a crash course in OOP and solved my problem. After this I realised I was using Objects in all of the apps I was creating and had been working with them all along. I'm by no means an expert in OOP but I've learned by the just in time method. If I need something I'll only learn it when I need it.I know nothing about Dependency Injection, Factory, Entity, DAO and Spring as I've never had a need for them. I have needed Sqlite, Firebase, Json ect to make apps work in the past. If I need any of the above then I'll learn them.I keep thinking to myself I must learn Kotlin at some stage but I can get apps working perfectly fine using Java alone. While I've had a play around with the language, I've no need for it at present and I'm comfortable using Java. In fact the last 2 things I've needed (Tensorflow and Arcore) have their documentation in Java. Java is by no means dead despite what others will tell you.


I guarantee you’ve either used, or would benefit from DI and DAO patterns based on what you’ve just said. I guess this is sort of the problem, it’s easy to jump straight to frameworks and various platforms without actually understanding good software engineering principals. Specifically, good developers are lazy developers. Less code is better. I forgot to add that somewhere between the learning OOP basics and design patterns should come Unit testing. Then after design patterns; Integration Testing.

Java is dead argument only comes from ‘Users’ that don’t understand Enterprise software. Java on the desktop client side can certainly be classed as dead, but Java and other JVM based languages on the server side are as popular now as ever.
Edited by: "jazlabs" 15th Feb
jazlabs15/02/2020 15:21

I guarantee you’ve either used, or would benefit from DI and DAO patterns b …I guarantee you’ve either used, or would benefit from DI and DAO patterns based on what you’ve just said.



I'm sure I have, I just Googled DAO and it's database related. I've created a window cleaners app that stores data in a Sqlite database. I've been told by a developer (I attend a load of MeetUp's) to use Room or Firestore but Firestore charges after a certain amount of hits per day and Room is just an upgrade of Sqlite so I'm not sure I need too. I haven't released the app though, maybe I should as it's pretty useful.

I've had a few AHA moments where everything just made sense. First time was when I linked Buttons and TextViews to variables, once I could do that it opened up a whole world of possibilities. Second was when I learned to debug, this came about from this question that went chilly, only for some kind soul nudging me that my problem wasn't my actual question but that I didn't know how to debug. Third was cracking that OOP problem, I had a 3 week crash course in OOP but it all made sense when I finally solved it.

I'm currently trying to work with Tensorflow (machine learning). I've spent since Christmas learning a bit of Python and I'e created my own model from images stored on my PC. I've done that OK, transformed them to Tensorflow Lite but I'm stumped at getting the models to work on Android. I'll solve it eventually. To other prospective coders, that's the great thing about learning one language as others will come easily.

Now I've taken a slight detour and am trying to create something for Augmented Reality like the Pokemon Go game. This seems a bit easier that Tensorflow but atm I've no phone to test on (Arcore only works on certain devices). My idea is to create a treasure hunt, point your phone at a landmark or scene and get an Augmented Image or clue to the next landmark. This was my original idea with Tensorflow but Arcore seems a lot easier to use. Arcore has image recognition but it's nowhere near as powerful as TF. TF is where I want to be at though as I've a killer app (I think) that would do well with machine learning.

I've 3 apps in the store but I removed 2. I'm ultra paranoid about Google bots banning process. I've read horror stories about people being banned for life for using copyright images. As 2 of my apps are loosely based on other companies, I removed them just in case. I've still to comply (for life) with all Google's policies for these apps even though they don't have many users
always makes me laugh when I click on these deals and it says on Udemy "you already purchased this course in xxx"
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