Jessops 900x70 Telescope £59.99 was £200 with free Cewe Photobook worth £18.99!
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Jessops 900x70 Telescope £59.99 was £200 with free Cewe Photobook worth £18.99!

13
Found 6th Jan
This seems like a really good deal for the money. Regardless of the fact that is should of apparently been £200 this is still excellent for £60. 675x magnification with a good quality EQ1 mount for tracking of objects. I've seen this in my local store and the build quality was VERY good. It's a Refractor scope so can be used for looking out to sea etc.
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marxmia1 h, 25 m ago

Would this suit a beginner star gazer /astronomy? Ta.



I have been doing stargazing for 4 years now, the best possible advice I could give you is make contact with your local astronomy club. On clear nights they usually have different types of telescopes on show. Avoid telescopes that are sold in Lidl. Aldi and other high street stores.
You will be amazed how much difference there is in entry level proper stargazing telescopes to the cheaper high street store ones. Don't buy anything you haven't looked through.
Download a free program called Stellarium which shows you what is up there to see each day/night. Or Mobile Observatory for Android devices. Welcome to the vast world of outer space.
Binoculars are best to start with & I still use them for stargazing.
Best proper telescope seller is First Light Optics.
If you buy a telescope as someone new to astronomy you're probably best going for one with an Alt Azimuth mount as these are easier to use, though if you use it often an equitorial mount setup correctly, this will be better (however is a little more complicated to setup).

Most people recommend that anyone new to astronomy go for as big an apperture (biggest diameter) as they can afford as this usually leads to better results. The cheapest large apperture telescopes are usually dobsonian ones and these usually have a small stand which you can rest on a table to look at the night sky.

As Criton's friend states I wouldn't recommend getting a telescope from a high street store.

Depending upon your budget I would go for one of these:


Best low price (£47) firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml (Dobsonian) What images you can expect? you can just about make out saturns rings if you look at the pictures in the amazon reviews in this link --->: amazon.co.uk/Sky…CCW

Best Dobsonian under £100 (£95) firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml (Dobsonian with slightly larger apperture)

Best beginners telescope (£147) firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml (equitorial mounted reflector) I would recommend this one personally as it is quite good for the price and you could use this for a good few years and still be happy with the images you are getting, whereas the other ones you may feel you want to upgrade if you get into astromomy.

Hope this helps!
Edited by: "petermcgregor14" 6th Jan
13 Comments
Cheers have some heat
Looks good, heat added!
Would this suit a beginner star gazer
/astronomy? Ta.
Edited by: "marxmia" 6th Jan
I know Jessops description says it would, but I also know there are some serious astronomers here on hkud.
5.5% TCB
marxmia1 h, 25 m ago

Would this suit a beginner star gazer /astronomy? Ta.



I have been doing stargazing for 4 years now, the best possible advice I could give you is make contact with your local astronomy club. On clear nights they usually have different types of telescopes on show. Avoid telescopes that are sold in Lidl. Aldi and other high street stores.
You will be amazed how much difference there is in entry level proper stargazing telescopes to the cheaper high street store ones. Don't buy anything you haven't looked through.
Download a free program called Stellarium which shows you what is up there to see each day/night. Or Mobile Observatory for Android devices. Welcome to the vast world of outer space.
Binoculars are best to start with & I still use them for stargazing.
Best proper telescope seller is First Light Optics.
Specifications

  • Objective Diameter: 70mm
  • Focal length: 900mm
  • Focal ratio: 12.8
  • Max magnification: 675x
  • SR4mm (225x), 12.5mm (72x) and 20mm (45x) eyepieces
  • 3x Barlow lens
  • EQ-1 mount
  • Adjustable aluminium tripod
  • 5 x 24 Finder scope

70mm diameter puts me off. I would think some 10x50 binoculars might be better for the casual stargazer.
Thanks for the advice guys. It's for my 14yr daughter, started astronomy last year and doing GCSE this year . So on that, are 10 x 50 the bino's to go for? Birthday coming up very soon. Thanks again.
A quick google suggests to avoid jessops telescopes. Stick to brands that specialise in stargazing equipment.
whathesmeg44 m ago

I have been doing stargazing for 4 years now, the best possible advice I …I have been doing stargazing for 4 years now, the best possible advice I could give you is make contact with your local astronomy club. On clear nights they usually have different types of telescopes on show. Avoid telescopes that are sold in Lidl. Aldi and other high street stores.You will be amazed how much difference there is in entry level proper stargazing telescopes to the cheaper high street store ones. Don't buy anything you haven't looked through.Download a free program called Stellarium which shows you what is up there to see each day/night. Or Mobile Observatory for Android devices. Welcome to the vast world of outer space.Binoculars are best to start with & I still use them for stargazing.Best proper telescope seller is First Light Optics.


I completely agree with this. I bought a Bresser 76x700 or something like that a while ago. It’s impossible to keeps till and fine tuning to see a specific star is very difficult.
Since then I’ve bought a decent pair of Vanguard binoculars and got a great deal on Celestron 20x80 binoculars.
The later is difficult to hold but works Ona Tripod. In each case of both binoculars I see far better than with the telescope.
If you buy a telescope as someone new to astronomy you're probably best going for one with an Alt Azimuth mount as these are easier to use, though if you use it often an equitorial mount setup correctly, this will be better (however is a little more complicated to setup).

Most people recommend that anyone new to astronomy go for as big an apperture (biggest diameter) as they can afford as this usually leads to better results. The cheapest large apperture telescopes are usually dobsonian ones and these usually have a small stand which you can rest on a table to look at the night sky.

As Criton's friend states I wouldn't recommend getting a telescope from a high street store.

Depending upon your budget I would go for one of these:


Best low price (£47) firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml (Dobsonian) What images you can expect? you can just about make out saturns rings if you look at the pictures in the amazon reviews in this link --->: amazon.co.uk/Sky…CCW

Best Dobsonian under £100 (£95) firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml (Dobsonian with slightly larger apperture)

Best beginners telescope (£147) firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml (equitorial mounted reflector) I would recommend this one personally as it is quite good for the price and you could use this for a good few years and still be happy with the images you are getting, whereas the other ones you may feel you want to upgrade if you get into astromomy.

Hope this helps!
Edited by: "petermcgregor14" 6th Jan
The specification of this scope is almost identical to the forty year old scope I actually have. Assuming similar optical quality you will see the main moons of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, vast detail on the Moon and a number of double stars and nebulae, as well as some of the brighter stars showing their true colours. Maximum usable magnification will be about 150. The tripod will be flimsy and that will make lining up difficult. The equatorial mount is useful because that allows you to follow and object with just one control as the Earth turns, I've always found this an extremely useful feature but would listen to experiences from users of Dobsonian or altaz mounts.

It's powerful enough (if it has an inverting adapter) to act as a very powerful, but not very portable, terrestrial scope.

My opinion is that, at the price, this is an absolute bargain and would be a perfect gift for a 14 year old who is seriously interested in astronomy. It's cheap enough to take the risk and good enough to do the job. Be prepared to spend many hundreds of pounds if the hobby takes off.

Voted hot.
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