Jessops Astronomical Telescope 1100-102  for 62.99 (add code  binos10) @ Jessops
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Jessops Astronomical Telescope 1100-102 for 62.99 (add code binos10) @ Jessops

42
Found 10th Dec 2013
Unlike many starter telescopes, the Jessops 1100-102 Reflector Telescope has a 102mm objective diameter, much larger than the 60-80mm normally found.

What benefit does this have? Well it means that there's a much larger area to capture light which means a much brighter image and sharper details.

This well built telescope comes supplied with three eyepieces and a 3x Barlow lens for a range of different magnifications. The tripod mount also has a fine adjustment feature for easy following of astronomical objects.

Specifications

Configuration: Newtonian Reflector 1100mm Focal length 102mm objective diameter Red dot finder scope 3x Barlow lens supplied 6mm, 12.5mm & 20mm eyepieces included Maximum magnification of 400x Including tripod & counter balance weights Micro adjustment controls

42 Comments

Think I need a decent telescope to find a gold flamedeer. Lol.

Good deal OP.

jasmine41110

Think I need a decent telescope to find a gold flamedeer. Lol. Good deal … Think I need a decent telescope to find a gold flamedeer. Lol. Good deal OP.

How about this one firstlightoptics.com/cle…tml

£70 for an anti tank missile launcher! Sold

Use code binos10 for 10% off making it £62.99 !
Edited by: "rjcoolio" 11th Dec 2013

reesycer

£70 for an anti tank missile launcher! Sold



its very rare someone can make me laugh online. Congrats!

This is not a new offer, Jessops has been selling this telescope at this price throughout November, rjcoolio has post a discount code binos10 it worked for me so well done it always nice to see these discount code. It would b nice to hear from someone who has bought one of these Jessops Telescopes to hear if it is any good.

liston2

This is not a new offer, Jessops has been selling this telescope at this … This is not a new offer, Jessops has been selling this telescope at this price throughout November, rjcoolio has post a discount code binos10 it worked for me so well done it always nice to see these discount code. It would b nice to hear from someone who has bought one of these Jessops Telescopes to hear if it is any good.



I bought one last year for £80 and it is great fun. I have used it to see Jupiter and its moons and Saturn etc. Great for a starter scope. It is NOT Hubble so please be realistic in your expectations.

The laser sight works well IF people spend the time to set it up. If you put the effort in to study and find stuff you will love it.

Hope this helps

Noj

Another great deal. Go and inspire some young minds.

Good product, great price imo. HEat but no fLaME sadly!

Good price - unfortunately I've got nowhere to put it...

Bigfootpete

Good price - unfortunately I've got nowhere to put it...



Good price, shame it's Britain and either cloudy or raining, or there's so much light pollution you can barely see the moon

102mm objective diameter, much larger than the 60-80mm normally found



Misleading. The 60-80mm objectives are usually cheap refractors (lens) telescopes. This is still small for a reflector (mirror) objective. The two types are not comparable in this way. The old rule of thumb used to be that the minimum useful objective size was 3 inches (~75mm) for a refractor but 6 inches (~150mm) for a reflector. This is still a small telescope for it's type, about four inch objective. Certainly not "much larger than normally found", though there are a number of 3 inch reflectors on the market.

I wouldn't advise any budding young astronomers to go for anything under 4.5 inches (reflector). A cheap telescope can ruin any enthusiasm. In Astronomy you certainly get what you pay for. At this price it would be better to get a decent pair of binoculars. As a passionate Astronomer wanting to get young people into the hobby I'm afraid its cold from me.

nebulaman

I wouldn't advise any budding young astronomers to go for anything under … I wouldn't advise any budding young astronomers to go for anything under 4.5 inches (reflector). A cheap telescope can ruin any enthusiasm. In Astronomy you certainly get what you pay for. At this price it would be better to get a decent pair of binoculars. As a passionate Astronomer wanting to get young people into the hobby I'm afraid its cold from me.



Do you have any suggestions? I would like to get my young children interested.

ive been looking at the dobson one in aldi. its 39.99 but im rubbish at these things.... any advice?

Banned

£70 to look at my hot neighbour, nice

BACONIZGUD4ME

£70 to look at my hot neighbour, nice



Venus?

BACONIZGUD4ME

£70 to look at my hot neighbour, nice


. Do you really live that close to the sun?

Is this not worth it? I wouldn't mind a telescope, granted I will rarely use it, but be pretty educational when I do, especially with the little getting educated in science now.

Jocky Balboa

. Do you really live that close to the sun?



Very good very good.

benih

Do you have any suggestions? I would like to get my young children … Do you have any suggestions? I would like to get my young children interested.


I would have a look at some of the ones on this page
firstlightoptics.com/ref…tml

Been toying with the idea of getting a telescope. The skywatcher Explorer 130, the skywatcher 130 heritage and the Skyhawk 1145 generally get good reviews and recommendations for starters. BUT as someone mentioned, you need to be realistic in what you expect to see so google for some images taken with the telescopes (some Amazon reviews have pics added).

Scopesnskies do some great introductory vids....
scopesnskies.com/vid…tre

and have lots of info on some of the telescopes mentioned above eg skyhawk 114


Edited by: "gari189" 11th Dec 2013

vant09

guys have a look at this … guys have a look at this http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/126828-jessops-telescopeany-good/might not be a great telescope. so its up to you



Good advice on SGL forums for anyone interested in purchasing a telescope for starting out in astronomy.
Would agree with the consensus and generally avoid this one.

reesycer

£70 for an anti tank missile launcher! Sold


someone spends too much time gaming (and looking at your profile pic, guessing it's a PS )

What will this be like for looking through net curtains?8)

reesycer

£70 for an anti tank missile launcher! Sold

now now its not a javlin

Good time of year for star gazing

Noj

I bought one last year for £80 and it is great fun. I have used it to see … I bought one last year for £80 and it is great fun. I have used it to see Jupiter and its moons and Saturn etc. Great for a starter scope. It is NOT Hubble so please be realistic in your expectations.The laser sight works well IF people spend the time to set it up. If you put the effort in to study and find stuff you will love it. Hope this helpsNoj



What did those planets look like through the telescope? were they big and defined or small blurry dots?
like most interested but with no actual information hard to decide.

Thanks

simonbrowne

What did those planets look like through the telescope? were they big and … What did those planets look like through the telescope? were they big and defined or small blurry dots?like most interested but with no actual information hard to decide.Thanks

You can make out the red spot using the barlow lense and easily identify that it is Saturn with the rings. I would say that the thrill i in finding things yourself and seeing them yourself. Unless you spend a lot more money you wont do any better. I will spend more maybe next year and buy a motorised one to be honest but as a starter scope I really can't fault it. Hope this helps a little

digbys

What will this be like for looking through net curtains?8)


Excellent - if you're Australian (the image is upside down)

How powerful are these Would I be able to see the lunar modules still left on the moon? If not what kind of telescope would I need.

gari189

I would have a look at some of the ones on this page … I would have a look at some of the ones on this page http://www.firstlightoptics.com/reflectors.html Been toying with the idea of getting a telescope. The skywatcher Explorer 130, the skywatcher 130 heritage and the Skyhawk 1145 generally get good reviews and recommendations for starters. BUT as someone mentioned, you need to be realistic in what you expect to see so google for some images taken with the telescopes (some Amazon reviews have pics added).Scopesnskies do some great introductory vids....http://www.scopesnskies.com/video-help-centre and have lots of info on some of the telescopes mentioned above eg skyhawk 114

They've also got a sense of humour, check this page out

deeman180

How powerful are these Would I be able to see the lunar modules still … How powerful are these Would I be able to see the lunar modules still left on the moon? If not what kind of telescope would I need.



You won't be able to see them as they were never there in the first place.
"if we can't go to the moon now how did we do it in 1969"
"Wish we had the technology we had in the 60's"
blah blah blah

can of worms (opened)

benih

Do you have any suggestions? I would like to get my young children … Do you have any suggestions? I would like to get my young children interested.



1) Get out in the countryside away from the lights of the town and use your eyes. Pick out the constellations, look for the faint ribbon of stars crossing the sky of the milky way, count how many stars of the seven sisters (Pleiades) you can count. A truly dark sky is an amazing thing to behold. Too many of us are too busy to even look up. Get a decent guide book or planisphere.

2) For the price of this deal you can get a decent pair of binoculars. I would recommend a pair of 10x50 or higher eg 20x80 etc. With young kids you would need to get a decent tripod so you can lock it into position to show them particular things. The moon is amazing through binoculars (tip: view the moon away from full moon as the shadows pick out the craters better). You can also try the pick out the four main moons of Jupiter. Look at star clusters or even be amazed by the milky way. If the passion for astronomy wanes you still have a pair of binoculars for birdwatching, looking out to sea and other terrestrial pursuits.

3) If you still have the passion for the subject then get your first scope. As I say, a 4.5" is minimum for a reflector. Expect to pay £200 for a decent scope. Don't go for a refractor unless you are willing to spend over £500 as the optics are far more complicated and anything below this will just be poor. With this scope you will see the cloud bands on Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, the brighter galaxies, nebulae etc.

Don't get a scope first of all. They can be tricky to set up and unless you know your way around the night sky you will get frustrated. Visit your local Astronomical society on one of their meeting. They love passing on their passion for the subject onto newbies. They will only be too pleased to give you help and advice.

NEVER EVER LOOK AT THE SUN WITH THE NAKED EYE OR THROUGH ANY OPTICAL INSTRUMENT!!! (This is a highly specialised area with the proper equipment costing thousands).

And finally...... take it slowly and have fun!

(Sorry to hijack this thread)

Any suggestions for a good pair of binoculars then? id prefer the 20x80 as you say.

djdynamite123

Any suggestions for a good pair of binoculars then? id prefer the 20x80 … Any suggestions for a good pair of binoculars then? id prefer the 20x80 as you say.



For starters

Remember, big binoculars are heavy especially when looking up at the sky.

A little tip that helps when choosing a telescope is to remember that the maximum magnification possible is only 50 times per inch. And that's just a limit you can't beat. So you can easily see what the maximum magnification of a telescope will be by looking at the size of it. a 60mm telescope can't resolve more than 120x magnification. Anything higher claimed is **** and will just give you a blurry mess.

Also in the UK you aren't going to get close to these limits anyway with our terribly polluted skies. I'd still prefer binoculars as I really can't afford the prices of the really decent telescopes and just for convenience you really want one of the motor driven tripods with the computers that can automatically track and go to any object in the sky. Those start around £350 for a reasonable quality telescope and tripod.

Know nothing about telescope and really want to buy one. Can anyone suggest me a good telescope under £100 . It will really help . Thanks

It's pretty good. Got to see Saturn during the summer!

Baz417

Know nothing about telescope and really want to buy one. Can anyone … Know nothing about telescope and really want to buy one. Can anyone suggest me a good telescope under £100 . It will really help . Thanks



I can tell you that there isn't a good one under £100. If you start with a pair of binocs and use that as your base line of quality. There isn't a £100 or less telescope that can beat the binoculars.

If you pay a little more you can get one that does. Like this

amazon.co.uk/Sky…ube

under £130 delivered

I don't want to put you off, just trying to help you get a good view of the stars.
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