Jessops Telescope 700x76 - was £139.99 at Jessops now £33.99
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Jessops Telescope 700x76 - was £139.99 at Jessops now £33.99

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Found 30th Dec 2017
Don't know a lot about telescopes but this seems a good deal. 15% off with TELESCOPES15 and free delivery to store.
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It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.
The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.
The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.
I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.
and in how much detail will i be able to see Uranus with this?
Quids8 m ago

Perhaps a dumb question, but can you do terrestrial viewing with this kind …Perhaps a dumb question, but can you do terrestrial viewing with this kind of telescope?


You need an erecting prism which most likely this will have.

I'm with rexdare on this, this is nothing more than a toy that will take up space. You'd be much better buying a pair of 10x50 binoculars at this price point.

76mm is the main number, that determines the amount of light it can gather but there is also a secondary mirror that will reduce this number further. The 700 is it's focal length. This is very long for something this size which will give higher magnifications but that's not always a good thing. The main mirror will most likely be spherical (astro mirrors should be parabolic) although with something with a long focal length it won't really matter. The eyepieces will also be likely poor quality and the finderscope useless.
red238 m ago

and in how much detail will i be able to see Uranus with this?



Close enough to see all the Klingons.
88 Comments
£139.99 think you mean £39.99
Looks great!
chrisbarker113 m ago

£139.99 think you mean £39.99


No he means £139.99. £100 off plus the extra 15%.

Wanted a telescope to have a go with for a while & looks good value for a starter.
Thank you, tempted but don't know enough about them. Looked at reviews but they are very mixed. Not sure about chrisbarker1's comment either, Jessops definitely say £100 savings. Very vague.
Edited by: "Technox" 30th Dec 2017
chrisbarker115 m ago

£139.99 think you mean £39.99


Less the 15% off with the code = £33.99
Minimum you want is a 4.5” diameter, ideally 6” reflector.
Perhaps a dumb question, but can you do terrestrial viewing with this kind of telescope?
and in how much detail will i be able to see Uranus with this?
Avatar
deleted1336857
That Peter Jones owns Jessops, Dragons Den chappie.

Still good price for a touch of star gazing, and a must for young 'uns, and budding Sir Patrick Moore, Brian May et al.

Have some heat!
Edited by: "deleted1336857" 30th Dec 2017
Plus Get a free CEWE Photobook voucher worth £18.99 when you buy this product.
According the website
Hot as the sun! *disclaimer: DO NOT use this to look at the sun.
Heard these can be a nightmare to set up correctly.
red235 m ago

and in how much detail will i be able to see Uranus with this?


In about as much detail as you can see your own without a telescope.
Edited by: "Crossbow" 30th Dec 2017
Quids8 m ago

Perhaps a dumb question, but can you do terrestrial viewing with this kind …Perhaps a dumb question, but can you do terrestrial viewing with this kind of telescope?


You need an erecting prism which most likely this will have.

I'm with rexdare on this, this is nothing more than a toy that will take up space. You'd be much better buying a pair of 10x50 binoculars at this price point.

76mm is the main number, that determines the amount of light it can gather but there is also a secondary mirror that will reduce this number further. The 700 is it's focal length. This is very long for something this size which will give higher magnifications but that's not always a good thing. The main mirror will most likely be spherical (astro mirrors should be parabolic) although with something with a long focal length it won't really matter. The eyepieces will also be likely poor quality and the finderscope useless.
red238 m ago

and in how much detail will i be able to see Uranus with this?



Close enough to see all the Klingons.
topcashback giving 5.5% also good deal would those in the know recommend this product then ?
GlentoranMark6 m ago

You'd be much better buying a pair of 10x50 binoculars at this price point.


Sage advice.
It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.
The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.
The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.
I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.
ecuador3 m ago

It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth …It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.



Excellent input, thank-you for the advice!
GlentoranMark, would this be suitable for a child? That was the reason why I was looking for one in the first place....
ecuador10 m ago

It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth …It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.


Is the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 the same spec as the Jessops 300x76 Telescope for £26.99 (plus the 15%off) jessops.com/p/j…001 ? as i only wanted a cheap starter telescope for my 10 year old
Edited by: "satstuart" 30th Dec 2017
If you look at the Moon around 1am tonight, it will occult (cover over) the bright star Aldebran. You won't need a telescope for this. Aldebran is the brightest star in Taurus and orange in colour. That will give you something to look at and should be viewable UK wide (although I've only checked for my own location). Have a look as soon as it gets dark and Aldebran will be a good bit to the left of the Moon moving closer as the night goes on.
If space is at a premium (Pun intentional}, then I'd probably go for this 300x76 table top model down from £89 to £26.99 - but further reduced to £22.94 with the code TELESCOPES15 - and you still get the £18 photobook voucher as well., {so your effectively getting it for less than a fiver}
Yes there are far better telescopes around, but you cant really go wrong if buying as a first scope for a beginner.


32950943-rguVz.jpg
ecuador11 m ago

It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth …It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.



Can you recommend the best binoculars in the under £100 price range?
ecuador11 m ago

It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth …It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.




Fantastic post, agree with everything you say.
ecuador19 m ago

It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth …It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.


Thanks for the explanation, this is very useful. Just goes to show that people will vote anything hot if there's a big enough discount. I'm sure a pile of dog crap will get voted hot if the deal said "was £150, now £10!"
fearthegrimp15 m ago

GlentoranMark, would this be suitable for a child? That was the reason why …GlentoranMark, would this be suitable for a child? That was the reason why I was looking for one in the first place....



Ecuador seems to know his stuff. I've never used or seen this in action so I can't say. It will work but it will also frustrate. If the mirrors are out of line then you'll get a poor image. The slightest touch and you'll shake the image because of it's poor tripod. The finderscope will have to be set up but again it would be useless.

I wouldn't buy it but as a 12 year old I bought a cheap (toy) telescope for myself. It sat in a corner until it was chucked out (and I love the subject.) It was only when I turned an adult did I buy myself something basic but decent (a 4" refractor.) It's sitting with coats over it and only gets used around once a month.

I've 3 pairs of binoculars and I get far more use from these. I've a pair of 15x70 binoculars that would be superior to this scope that cost £70. I'll be out tonight watching that occultation with these.
Have to concur with Ecuador and others - a scope like this really isn't worth anything at all and will do more harm than good to a budding astronomer!
fearthegrimp19 m ago

GlentoranMark, would this be suitable for a child? That was the reason why …GlentoranMark, would this be suitable for a child? That was the reason why I was looking for one in the first place....


Depends on the child. Will give a decent view of the moon, Jupiter will appear as a bright dot with 3 or 4 smaller dots around it, Saturn it might be possible to see the rings. M42 will be a grey smudge even at the darkest of sites, other DSO really dim smudges. In fact spend £10k on a scope and it will still be a grey smudge, just a bright one. Don't be fooled in to thinking you'll see Hubble style images, you won't, not without a camera attached, but it's a moneypit going down that route.

But this assumes you'll be able to align it long enough to see anything. The scope will shake as you focus due to the rubbish mount and will just be an exercise in frustration. To get detail means you'll need to use a long focal length, so a 10mm EP or something, then objects will zip across view in 20 seconds or so, so adjust the mount, wait for it to stop wobbling, glance and repeat.

I started off with a 114p celestron, not a huge improvement on this. EQ mounts are horrible for manual viewing imo, I soon upgraded to a nexstar 127 which tracks for me, connects to my PC, love it.

You can get decent results with just a DSLR, kit lens and a tripod
satstuart19 m ago

Is the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 the same spec as the Jessops 300x76 …Is the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 the same spec as the Jessops 300x76 Telescope for £26.99 (plus the 15%off) https://www.jessops.com/p/jessops/300x76-telescope-white-97001 ? as i only wanted a cheap starter telescope for my 10 year old


No it is not. The most glaring difference is the eyepieces. The Heritage has two eyepieces that are what I would call the most basic usable ones and usually cost £20 each. You basically get them for free. I would not give my 10 year old the Jessops one.
Edited by: "ecuador" 30th Dec 2017
If you want a telescope check out meteorwatch.org/
restyler18 m ago

If space is at a premium (Pun intentional}, then I'd probably go for this …If space is at a premium (Pun intentional}, then I'd probably go for this 300x76 table top model down from £89 to £26.99 - but further reduced to £22.94 with the code TELESCOPES15 - and you still get the £18 photobook voucher as well., {so your effectively getting it for less than a fiver}Yes there are far better telescopes around, but you cant really go wrong if buying as a first scope for a beginner.[Image]


If you need the £18 photobook, at £5 I might say it is ok. At any price above that I'd maintain that you can certainly go wrong buying this for a beginner, it is better to not get them a telescope...
Zuulan21 m ago

Can you recommend the best binoculars in the under £100 price range?


I did a binocular presentation last year at the same astro club, you can see the powerpoint that includes some recommendations at the bottom of the page here.
Avatar
deleted90968
This here is the optical tube on a very basic tripod mount with an eyepiece or two. Newtonian optical tubes are a tube with a pair of mirrors, not really much of the value of a newtonian is in the tube, the mount being the more major component and in this case there is not much to be learned about using a telescope from a simple mount.

In my opinion it is great to start with an equatorial, because there is more of a connection between the movement of the scope and the movement of the objects in the sky, therefore more to be learned.

If buying a telescope, it's good to have a transport plan if you live in a well lit built up area. I have a fairly decent scope but there is little to do in my own backyard, just the planets and the moon. Once you've seen them then....
Have to drive out to the sticks to get clear enough skies for deep sky objects.
ecuador41 m ago

It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth …It is hard to describe how horrible this telescope is. It is not worth £10, as all it will do is turn users away from amateur astronomy.The tripod/mount is frustrating to use. The finderscope pretty useless.The eyepieces are state of the art for the 1600's (the Hyugens ones) or the 1700's (the SR 4mm). The cost of a very basic eyepiece that is not complete junk like those starts at around £30, so if you add that to the price you will have paid more than higher quality beginner telescopes that include them.I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.


Brilliant informed summary. Well done! (What do you know about garden sheds, I'm looking for one!!)
ecuador14 m ago

If you need the £18 photobook, at £5 I might say it is ok. At any price a …If you need the £18 photobook, at £5 I might say it is ok. At any price above that I'd maintain that you can certainly go wrong buying this for a beginner, it is better to not get them a telescope...


Thanks for all the advice. Never mind children, I want a beginner's scope for an adult --- me.

If I didn't want heavy-ish binoculars, what about somethng like the Celestron Travelscope 70, which has yo-yoed in price on Amazon, amazon.co.uk/Cel…h=1 ??
(I'd wait till it dropped to £60 again )
jaydeeuk128 m ago

Depends on the child. Will give a decent view of the moon, Jupiter will …Depends on the child. Will give a decent view of the moon, Jupiter will appear as a bright dot with 3 or 4 smaller dots around it, Saturn it might be possible to see the rings. M42 will be a grey smudge even at the darkest of sites, other DSO really dim smudges. In fact spend £10k on a scope and it will still be a grey smudge, just a bright one. Don't be fooled in to thinking you'll see Hubble style images, you won't, not without a camera attached, but it's a moneypit going down that route.But this assumes you'll be able to align it long enough to see anything. The scope will shake as you focus due to the rubbish mount and will just be an exercise in frustration. To get detail means you'll need to use a long focal length, so a 10mm EP or something, then objects will zip across view in 20 seconds or so, so adjust the mount, wait for it to stop wobbling, glance and repeat.I started off with a 114p celestron, not a huge improvement on this. EQ mounts are horrible for manual viewing imo, I soon upgraded to a nexstar 127 which tracks for me, connects to my PC, love it. You can get decent results with just a DSLR, kit lens and a tripod



I've a Celestron 102SLT, a great little scope. I attached a Phillips webcam to it and photographed the Moon and planets. I am very light polluted and tbf I'm more of an armchair astronomer. Setting up the telescope only takes 5 minutes but it's a chore. I'd much rather use my binoculars if something is viewable like tonight. My 15 x 70's are heavy but fine for short viewing spells. The best pair I had was 7x50's (until my nephew decided to dismantle them.) They were brilliant for sweeping star fields and clusters.

Threads like this make me want to upgrade but I know I wouldn't get the use out of it.

BTW I met Steve Tonkin (who runs the binocularnightsky website) when he gave a talk at my local astronomy club. That site is a wealth of info on Binoculars.
mcek13 m ago

Thanks for all the advice. Never mind children, I want a beginner's scope …Thanks for all the advice. Never mind children, I want a beginner's scope for an adult --- me.If I didn't want heavy-ish binoculars, what about somethng like the Celestron Travelscope 70, which has yo-yoed in price on Amazon, https://www.amazon.co.uk/Celestron-Travel-Scope-70-Telescope/dp/B006MCYAH4/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1514650816&sr=1-1&keywords=celstron+travelscope+70&th=1 ??(I'd wait till it dropped to £60 again )


That one is varying wildly in price. It was usually at £50 and it even fell to £39 at least once (when I got one myself). It is a quite nice telescope, I'd say great at wide field views, the eyepieces are the "usable" type I described so you are ready to go and it is even decent for terrestrial viewing. It has one significant drawback - the tripod is quite bad. A step above the Jessops, but that is not saying much. However, it can be attached to any photo tripod, so if you have a better photo tripod you can use that instead. And it can always be useful as a second portable scope if you get something better in the future (or use it as a guide-scope if you go into astrophotography). Just for kicks, you can actually see how it performs with planets (which is probably its weak spot) in my comparison using various scopes I own.
Edited by: "ecuador" 30th Dec 2017
ecuador13 m ago

That one is varying wildly in price. It was usually at £50 and it even …That one is varying wildly in price. It was usually at £50 and it even fell to £39 at least once (when I got one myself). It is a quite nice telescope, I'd say great at wide field views, the eyepieces are the "usable" type I described so you are ready to go and it is even decent for terrestrial viewing. It has one significant drawback - the tripod is quite bad. A step above the Jessops, but that is not saying much. However, it can be attached to any photo tripod, so if you have a better photo tripod you can use that instead. And it can always be useful as a second portable scope if you get something better in the future (or use it as a guide-scope if you go into astrophotography). Just for kicks, you can actually see how it performs with planets (which is probably its weak spot) in my comparison using various scopes I own.


Very interesting article. Yes, I was aware that the Travelscope had a useless tripod and a toy finderscope, but I was thinking of something for both bird watching and a beginner's skygazing at the price of basic binoculars (which I find awkward when I wear glasses).
So, time to think about it in more detail, and everyday is a school day.
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