Kidde Nighthawk Carbon Monoxide detector. £10 instore at B&Q.
324°Expired

Kidde Nighthawk Carbon Monoxide detector. £10 instore at B&Q.

32
Found 20th Mar 2010Made hot 20th Mar 2010
Saw these instore at £10 each. Small price to save your family's life. Apparently you need to replace your detector every 8 - 10 years as they lose their effectiveness and automatically go into 'Error' mode and chirp every 30 secs (even after a battery change). If you have children and are really serious about their safety £10 is a no-brainer.

32 Comments

Great price for somthing everyone should have (even if you dont have children) :thumbsup:

Victoria Plumb;8156643

Great price for somthing everyone should have (even if you dont have … Great price for somthing everyone should have (even if you dont have children) :thumbsup:



+1

Especially if you have an older boiler or gas fire.

Banned

Victoria Plumb;8156643

Great price for somthing everyone should have (even if you dont have … Great price for somthing everyone should have (even if you dont have children) :thumbsup:



Yeah - adults deserve to live as well.

:thumbsup: could be £8. When you spend £50+ in B&Q this weekend it's 20%off.

Ibought this 4 years ago and its peace of mind at nights with having a child H+R added [ i paid £35 for this aswell

is this national or clearence line as its not online

Excellent Price...this is something everyone should have....British Gas version is 29+ notes....this is steal....

thanks need one, as you said they 'go' after a while. had mine 10 years and yesterday started chirping every 30 secs even though i replaced the batteries

hot, just paid £14 delivered. (amazon)

I bought the same one from asda a week ago for £10

I have children but do not care about their safety.

I spent £10 on some magic beans instead.

Banned

cheapo;8157515

I have children but do not care about their safety.I spent £10 on some … I have children but do not care about their safety.I spent £10 on some magic beans instead.



:-D

We got one of these a few weeks ago as they are also in a 2 for £17 offer with a twin pack of Smoke Detecors, which we also got.

Can't be too careful these days.

To pardon the pun.... heat added!

Banned

johnson293;8157612

To pardon the pun.... heat added!



It's a carbon monoxide detector, not a smoke detector.

Hot, although these should be given away for free (well out of our Tax money) along with Smoke alarms!

JonnyTwoToes;8157630

It's a carbon monoxide detector, not a smoke detector.



Don't think anyone misunderstood did they? Unless you're criticising the pun, although CO is a product of poor combustion and so the 'heat added pun' stands. Now, begone with you. :-D

Banned

Wicked Lester;8158073

Don't think anyone misunderstood did they? Unless you're criticising the … Don't think anyone misunderstood did they? Unless you're criticising the pun, although CO is a product of poor combustion and so the 'heat added pun' stands. Now, begone with you. :-D



Carbon monoxide is formed from a partial oxidisation of compounds containing carbon. If you burn carbon monoxide (which is when the 'heat' pun would have been valid) you need oxygen and thus carbon dioxide is formed (harmless).

You begone. And take your mono oxide carbon with you.

We had the fire brigade come round to do an assessment of our house - they fitted 2 new smoke alarms, and when I asked about what they recommended for a carbon monoxide alarm they had one of those too which they gave us. So if you see firemen doing a thing about smoke alarms then it pays to ask about these too as they do carry them round.

A good buy and a sensible purchase. Not just relevant to babies, children or old people - CO poisoning can affect anyone and there is no real warning that one is breathing it. By the time one feels nauseous or sleepy (and who doesn't, sometimes!) it may well be too late to escape, assuming one is able-bodied.

Useful if there is any gas or solid fuel appliance in the house - or if there is an integral garage and the car is ever run in it for more than a minute or two.

tdogg;8157378

thanks need one, as you said they 'go' after a while. had mine 10 years … thanks need one, as you said they 'go' after a while. had mine 10 years and yesterday started chirping every 30 secs even though i replaced the batteries



mine too,

johnson293;8157612

We got one of these a few weeks ago as they are also in a 2 for £17 offer … We got one of these a few weeks ago as they are also in a 2 for £17 offer with a twin pack of Smoke Detecors, which we also got.



We got that deal too only with the 20% off as well. CO and smoke detectors can be mixed at that price too if you only need one of each.

Utility companies should just send one out to every gas customer,so every house has one and stick a one off £5 charge onto the bill,and yes even if you have one already. Makes it a easy thing to do:w00t:

JonnyTwoToes;8158116

Carbon monoxide is formed from a partial oxidisation of compounds … Carbon monoxide is formed from a partial oxidisation of compounds containing carbon. If you burn carbon monoxide (which is when the 'heat' pun would have been valid) you need oxygen and thus carbon dioxide is formed (harmless).You begone. And take your mono oxide carbon with you.



Ergo CO is a product of poor combustion.....

The partial oxidisation takes place within the burner. It doesn't happen by magic.

The 'heat added' pun still stands I say!

Question.. free smoke detectors?

Not available in Bridgwater

Banned

Wicked Lester;8158485

Ergo CO is a product of poor combustion.....The partial oxidisation takes … Ergo CO is a product of poor combustion.....The partial oxidisation takes place within the burner. It doesn't happen by magic.The 'heat added' pun still stands I say!



Or you could make carbon monoxide by pouring H2SO4 (sulphuric acid) onto sodium methanoate. No heat needed.

JonnyTwoToes;8158993

Or you could make carbon monoxide by pouring H2SO4 (sulphuric acid) onto … Or you could make carbon monoxide by pouring H2SO4 (sulphuric acid) onto sodium methanoate. No heat needed.



I imagine that must happen a lot in the average household too...a great deal for everyone!

Like others have said, you need a CO alarm to protect everyone, not just children - although of course they are more vunerable. My girlfriend's brother died from CO poisoning in his flat and he was in his 30's.

There is a campaign to raise awareness at the moment, here is the link if you are interested.
]Be Alarmed

"Small price to save your family's life."

I think you have to be cautious about putting too much stock in these devices. They are not the panacea they might seem to be.

"Apparently you need to replace your detector every 8 - 10 years.."

Here are some comments by Peter Parry from Usenet :

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

None of them are terribly reliable and they all degrade quickly (and
without any indication) over time so they soon create a false sense
of security. I certainly wouldn't use one as a means of protection.

Learning the simple to spot and easily visible danger signs and
understanding the type of gas burning device you have is both cheaper
and far more effective.

>Generally agree but I suspect it's not always so easy if it's not your
>boiler. What if it's behind a locked service door?

If you are talking about temporary rented or hotel accommodation then
you have a point - and the colour change cards are the best
precaution as they will change colour relatively quickly and have a
very limited life so use for one visit and throw away at the end.
Carrying an electronic alarm isn't as convenient.

In permanent accommodation even if the heater was inaccessible for
some reason (a common heater shared between flats and in a room only
the landlord had access to) eyesight is still better than gadgets.

Firstly, in such an installation there should be complete isolation
between the boiler room and the rest of the building. There should
be no way for any combustion products to get from the boiler area to
the living area. If there isn't such isolation a call to either BG or
Transco will get the installation shut down immediately no matter who
owns it.

Secondly, gas boilers don't suddenly fail and start churning out CO,
they tend to degrade fairly slowly. The problems of incomplete
combustion leave very obvious signs such as soot marks and
orange/yellow flames in the burner. Spotting these is far more
reliable than putting your faith in a box on the wall.

Carbon monoxide can result from burning all fossil fuels – not just
gas fires and boilers but the latter are the greater risk. If you are
having a gas boiler fitted or replaced use only room sealed units -
ones which draw all their combustion air from outside and vent
everything outside. Even if these malfunction they pose no risk to
the house occupants. Prevention is much more useful than detection.

The problem with CO detectors is that they are not very good at their
job and also have to be positioned carefully. Unlike smoke detectors
which are now very reliable and consistent in performance CO
detectors are quite delicate.

They are affected by moisture and the best place for them is on the
wall outside bedrooms about 5-6ft from the floor. Most however are
found in kitchens near the boiler where their useful life will be
very limited.

They can also be degraded by a number of household cleaners. When
the sensor fails it isn't easy to tell and it is far too easy to get
lured into a false sense of security. The "self test" button does
_not_ test the sensor is working.

Carbon monoxide detectors are set to sound an alarm before the
exposure to carbon monoxide would present a hazard to a healthy
adult. The European standard requires that, when new, at 30ppm CO,
the alarm must not activate for at least 120 minutes. At 50ppm CO,
the alarm must not activate before 60 minutes but must activate
before 90 minutes. At 100ppm CO, the alarm must not activate before
10 minutes but must activate before 40 minutes and at 300ppm CO, the
alarm must activate within 3 minutes.

Over time their sensitivity falls. The patch type have a useful life
of about 3-6 months and battery or mains powered ones can be relied
upon for about two years in a good environment.

If you are living in dubious rented accommodation they make sense,
but change them every two years. If it's your own house you are
better off checking appliances periodically, using room sealed
boilers and simply keeping your eyes open.

To test ones with a display hold a lit cigarette a few inches below
the sensor (or smoldering twig or incense stick). It shouldn't
usually alarm but you should get an indicator reading after a time.

JonnyTwoToes;8158993

Or you could make carbon monoxide by pouring H2SO4 (sulphuric acid) onto … Or you could make carbon monoxide by pouring H2SO4 (sulphuric acid) onto sodium methanoate. No heat needed.



Err, you could. Not a likely scenario in a boiler but you never know.....:p

Orinoco1;8158168

We had the fire brigade come round to do an assessment of our house - … We had the fire brigade come round to do an assessment of our house - they fitted 2 new smoke alarms, and when I asked about what they recommended for a carbon monoxide alarm they had one of those too which they gave us. So if you see firemen doing a thing about smoke alarms then it pays to ask about these too as they do carry them round.



I just phoned 999 and when she asked whch service i said fire brigade cause im after 2 free CO detector things. Dont understand cause i asked for fire brigade but apparently the police are coming now?

urbanlegend11;8162886

I just phoned 999 and when she asked whch service i said fire brigade … I just phoned 999 and when she asked whch service i said fire brigade cause im after 2 free CO detector things. Dont understand cause i asked for fire brigade but apparently the police are coming now?



I bet you are a constant stream of entertainment :thumbsup:
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