Kingston 64GB SSDNow V SSD 2.5" SATA-II - Read = 200MB/sec, Write = 110MB/sec
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Kingston 64GB SSDNow V SSD 2.5" SATA-II - Read = 200MB/sec, Write = 110MB/sec

53
Found 30th Jul 2010Made hot 30th Jul 2010
Product Description
This is Kingston’s latest generation of SSDNow V series drive giving all the performance gains and power consumption reductions of a new system, at a fraction of the price.
At up to 200 MB/s. the V series offers twice its predecessor’s read speeds, and adds outstanding write speeds of up to 160MB/s (128 GB), 110MB/s (64 GB) and 50MB/s (30 GB). Compatible with any SATA interface-based computer, they can quickly extend the life of an organisation’s systems.
With Windows 7 and TRIM support built in, plus legendary Kingston® reliability, a three-year warranty and 24/7 tech support, they are an excellent low-cost way to improve productivity and reduce downtime. FOR MORE KINGSTON SSD DEALS CLICK HERE

Product Specification
Capacity = 64GB
Form Factor = 2.5”
Read speed = 200MB/sec
Write speed = 110MB/sec
IOPS = Random 4K read: 3,900, Random 4K write: 15
Stand-alone or kit
Interface = SATA I & II
Weight = 81.65 grams (+/- 2 grams)
TRIM Support = Yes
3 Year Warranty

Adding an SSD to a desktop already using a standard hard disk drive is a smart and efficient way to upgrade. Transferring the operating system and applications from the HDD to the SSD allows the SSD to be used as a bootable drive that takes full advantage of the flash-based technology.

For notebooks, SSDNow drives are a perfect replacement for hard drives resulting in faster, more reliable performance. Making this change will improve a notebook's efficiency in a wide range of tasks, from booting up to running the most robust operating system and demanding applications.

SSDNow uses a standard SATA interface but, unlike a regular HDD, SSD is very rugged and built with no moving parts, making it ideal for power users and road warriors who push the limits of their notebooks. Other benefits include reduced power usage, less noise and less heat generation.

SSDNow V Series drive helps organizations of all sizes and consumers enhance the performance of computers with a Serial ATA (SATA) interface. By improving a computer's performance and durability, SSDNow V Series drives help increase productivity, and extend the life of existing computers.

53 Comments

They seemed to fly off the eShelf when they were £89, now a fiver cheaper. Hard to say no! :P

price getting reasonable... tempted to put this in my mac mini

Yeah I'm looking to get one for my ageing macbook. Should give it a good boost!

Tempted to get one for my 2009 Mac Mini. I don't know whether to just wait another 6 to 12 months though. Hmmm...
Edited by: "Leigh" 30th Jul 2010

must resist more tech purchases

Drop lower in price, please!

The Random 4K write speed seam a bit low
But still looks like a good deal
hmm interesting

looks like a great deal, but i'd read reviews to be sure there's no flaws.

great that so far no fool has posted "it's only 64GB - rip off!'

this seems like a great deal. lowest GB/£ on a SSD i've seen for a while

great for desktop boot/software drive, work notebooks, or those with NAS at home

voted hot; haven't seen a cheaper price elsewhere

ordered

I've got one and paid £99 for it not so long ago. I'd def recommend it at this price, might even buy another..

is this worth the price over this one??? - ebuyer.com/pro…415

I just ordered the OCZ model, but would I be best saving almost £50 on it? by getting this one above?

CooliceT

is this worth the price over this one??? - … is this worth the price over this one??? - http://www.ebuyer.com/product/225415I just ordered the OCZ model, but would I be best saving almost £50 on it? by getting this one above?



You get what you pay for with these drives. Customer complaints were notoriously high on these V series Kingston drives. If you want a Kingston one you should get the V+ series or better. The deal that I posted here: hotukdeals.com/dea…63/

which I see you bought is a far superior drive. If you have the money to spend and want performance, you would do a lot better with the OCZ.

Just a comment on SSD use in general

I have just built a system with a 64gb Crucial SSD as the main boot/OS disk, and a normal HD to store all data files and less often used programs.

The normal HD is set to spin down after 15 minutes of non-use and so there is hardly any HD noise or heat. Boot time is less than 30 seconds to the windows log-in screen, and if the PC is sent to sleep rather than shut down then it powers back up instantly.

I've added an OCZ "stealth power supply and a passive graphics card, and the quietness compared to a "normal" PC realy has to be heard.

The kingston will be an excellent good value choice to use for the OS/boot disk untill bigger capacity SSD units come down in price to enable just one high capacity SSD to be used in a system

Waldolf

Just a comment on SSD use in generalI have just built a system with a … Just a comment on SSD use in generalI have just built a system with a 64gb Crucial SSD as the main boot/OS disk, and a normal HD to store all data files and less often used programs. The normal HD is set to spin down after 15 minutes of non-use and so there is hardly any HD noise or heat. Boot time is less than 30 seconds to the windows log-in screen, and if the PC is sent to sleep rather than shut down then it powers back up instantly.I've added an OCZ "stealth power supply and a passive graphics card, and the quietness compared to a "normal" PC realy has to be heard. The kingston will be an excellent good value choice to use for the OS/boot disk untill bigger capacity SSD units come down in price to enable just one high capacity SSD to be used in a system



It's not so much that they aren't large enough for all your programs and files yet, it's that the flash memory has a certain amount of write cycles per chip, that's why ssd's have a life cycle of a certain amount of hours before failure (and why they have introduced the TRIM feature to increase the lifetime by speading the writes equally over the different chips). And as windows writes files constantly to the main boot drive (unless you move those operations to another drive), ssd's wont be good enough until the manufacturers increase the lifetime of the flash chips.

so with the OCZ? it be ok to use this to run Windows 7 64bit. just this? or can I run my CS5 package aswell, or would this not be enough with the cache involved?

Still a bit too rich for my blood, I might pick up a SSD up when the drives are less than £1 per GB

Droid

It's not so much that they aren't large enough for all your programs and … It's not so much that they aren't large enough for all your programs and files yet, it's that the flash memory has a certain amount of write cycles per chip, that's why ssd's have a life cycle of a certain amount of hours before failure (and why they have introduced the TRIM feature to increase the lifetime by speading the writes equally over the different chips). And as windows writes files constantly to the main boot drive (unless you move those operations to another drive), ssd's wont be good enough until the manufacturers increase the lifetime of the flash chips.



Unfortunately that is completely wrong...

A TRIM command allows an operating system to inform a solid-state drive (or "SSD") which data blocks, such as those belonging to a deleted file or affected by a format command, are no longer considered in use and can be wiped internally.

The problem is that SSD drives differ in the way that they read and write data than traditional hard drives. Data is stored in typically 4kb pages which themselves are stored in 128kb page blocks. SSD's can write to a page, but only erase a block. You must remember also that even though your OS may report your SSD drive being only 20Gb used, erases are not done until all page blocks have been written to. Thus, the trim command was invented. The trim command is used to check which blocks have "some" data in. It then determines what data can be moved from these "partial" blocks into a whole empty block, moves the data and marks the block as clean. This is a slow process so the trim command is what causes the SSD to do these operations ahead of any actual writing/erasing is needed.

Yes you are right that the spreading of the writes/erases over the different chips increases lifetime, but it isn't the TRIM function that does that. TRIM is used to keep write/erase speeds high instead of slowing down over time (to a detrimental rate) like the first iteration of SSD drives.

Oh, and SSD drives scale well with RAID...get 2 of these in a RAID and watch the speeds almost double.

Oh, and lastly, the lifespan of a typical SSD running 24 hours a day, 365 days a year is greater than that of a mechanical HDD.

I got one of these off ebay the other month for about this price thinking it would give my work laptop a boost, maybe help the battery life.

It's silent, which is nice...spooky almost, until the bloody fan kicks in to spoil the smugness....but the speed of the drive diminishes greatly the more you use the disk. Install OS and it flies....install all your apps and it's down to fast...use it day in day out and it's not noticeably faster than the old disk.
I was going to flog it off again, but if the new prices have dropped so much I'll be lucky to get £60 back so might as well keep it.
Summary: it's not all that.

ourdave

I got one of these off ebay the other month for about this price thinking … I got one of these off ebay the other month for about this price thinking it would give my work laptop a boost, maybe help the battery life.It's silent, which is nice...spooky almost, until the bloody fan kicks in to spoil the smugness....but the speed of the drive diminishes greatly the more you use the disk. Install OS and it flies....install all your apps and it's down to fast...use it day in day out and it's not noticeably faster than the old disk.I was going to flog it off again, but if the new prices have dropped so much I'll be lucky to get £60 back so might as well keep it.Summary: it's not all that.



Use windows 7 with TRIM...or use a tool to reset the drive (backup your data first)...this is typical first generation behavior....

windowsitpro.com/art…spx

2 x Kingston V+ 60Gb in Raid (note, not the Kingston V advertised here):

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
CrystalDiskMark 3.0 x64 (C) 2007-2010 hiyohiyo
Crystal Dew World : crystalmark.info/
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
* MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

Sequential Read : 415.223 MB/s
Sequential Write : 312.262 MB/s
Random Read 512KB : 157.694 MB/s
Random Write 512KB : 156.299 MB/s
Random Read 4KB (QD=1) : 17.143 MB/s [ 4185.3 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=1) : 16.211 MB/s [ 3957.8 IOPS]
Random Read 4KB (QD=32) : 33.439 MB/s [ 8163.8 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=32) : 23.112 MB/s [ 5642.5 IOPS]

Test : 1000 MB [C: 43.7% (52.0/119.1 GB)] (x2)
Date : 2010/07/30 21:42:20
OS : Windows 7 Ultimate Edition [6.1 Build 7600] (x64)

by 'raid' I'm guessing you mean RAID-0 rather than RAID-1 (or some other variant, though you're somewhat limited with two disks )

Would you guys recommend a clean install or would using some imaging software to duplicate my current 7 install be fine?

PR1

by 'raid' I'm guessing you mean RAID-0 rather than RAID-1 (or some other … by 'raid' I'm guessing you mean RAID-0 rather than RAID-1 (or some other variant, though you're somewhat limited with two disks )



Yes, RAID 0...Pure performance...I do backups daily for redundancy...You can add many disks to Raid-0...

Cheers karem, will take a look on there.

DsK

Would you guys recommend a clean install or would using some imaging … Would you guys recommend a clean install or would using some imaging software to duplicate my current 7 install be fine?



Would ALWAYS recommend doing a clean install. Especially of SSD because you need to setup the disk correctly (Windows 7 will usually do this right) so that the SSD offset is aligned with the stripe or block size.

Having said that, you can use windows 7 install to prepare the drive and then restore the data from your backup...However, you should not re-write the partition, only the data.

Edited by: "karem_lore" 30th Jul 2010

Droid

It's not so much that they aren't large enough for all your programs and … It's not so much that they aren't large enough for all your programs and files yet, it's that the flash memory has a certain amount of write cycles per chip, that's why ssd's have a life cycle of a certain amount of hours before failure (and why they have introduced the TRIM feature to increase the lifetime by speading the writes equally over the different chips). And as windows writes files constantly to the main boot drive (unless you move those operations to another drive), ssd's wont be good enough until the manufacturers increase the lifetime of the flash chips.



Very wrong about the lifetime comments Droid, the kingston website says the life expectency is 1,000,000 hours before failure, yes 1 million hours, is that not long enough!

@karem_lore

Yes I've just re-read my post and it looks like there's a part missing from one of my sentences. Guess my typing is faster than my brain can handle.

Also a few of you have misunderstood what I meant. I don't mean the drive will be totally dead, what I was trying to say was the write performance of the drive gradually degrades over time, as the wear levelling will wear out the chips eventually (some drives deal with it better than others), making the drive sluggish and therefore making itself worse over time.

The MTBF figure from manufacturers is a pretty good indication of how long you can expect a drive to keep performing within tolerable levels. The theoretical 1 million hours or whatever you say it is for this drive, well... the drive may last that long, but it won't remain working 100% of the original speed for that long.

And as the Kingston forums were awash with people complaining about just this situation not so long ago (until they pruned the negative threads/comments), my advice still stands, it's best to check up on a drive before purchase, and not jump at the first drive that happens to look cheap.

Like I said if you want a Kingston then you're better off paying a few extra £ and buying the V+ (or better) series.

Droid

You get what you pay for with these drives. Customer complaints were … You get what you pay for with these drives. Customer complaints were notoriously high on these V series Kingston drives. If you want a Kingston one you should get the V+ series or better. The deal that I posted here: http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/ocz-60gb-vertex-2e-ssd-2-5-r-285mb-/729563/#post9117450which I see you bought is a far superior drive. If you have the money to spend and want performance, you would do a lot better with the OCZ.



These look like the second generation V-Series drives, which are good drives. The first gen had loads of complaints due to problems with the controller which aren't present in this drive. Hot from me, good price and I've got no complaints about my 128GB one X)
Edited by: "satchef1" 30th Jul 2010

still quite expensive. I got a intel x25-m 80gb last month for 150ish. from ebay us, tax free, 3 years warranty...

Droid

It's not so much that they aren't large enough for all your programs and … It's not so much that they aren't large enough for all your programs and files yet, it's that the flash memory has a certain amount of write cycles per chip, that's why ssd's have a life cycle of a certain amount of hours before failure (and why they have introduced the TRIM feature to increase the lifetime by speading the writes equally over the different chips). And as windows writes files constantly to the main boot drive (unless you move those operations to another drive), ssd's wont be good enough until the manufacturers increase the lifetime of the flash chips.


No.
The life of the average SSD will be longer than the life of the average HDD.

SSD's wont be good enough until they're cheaper per Gb.

It's nice to see prices coming down. If they are. I don't check any more. :).

Wont it be nice in a few years when 1gb SSD's are around and affordable

hotukdealz

Wont it be nice in a few years when 1gb SSD's are around and affordable



Yeah with true transfer rates (and not Atto benchmarks)

anyone know if this could be used in a samsung nc10 netbook?

Borat

anyone know if this could be used in a samsung nc10 netbook?



No reason why not. youtube.com/wat…Ogw

dontasciime

No reason why not. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NB9D5aTgOgw



Thanks i also saw a review on a nc10 with the kingston v series drive and it looked like it took forever to boot up lol! but it was running xp so dont know if that was the problem.

I am now running with three SSD drives - and I can not put into words how much difference it makes to the average PC.
Of all the many numerous, sometimes stupidly expensive upgrades I have made to my may PC's, over the years, this is with-out a doubt the very very best, by a very very long stretch.

I am currently running a Raid0 stripe on the main PC with two Corsair P64's, and I replaced my Netbook atom 1.6Ghz lappy Harddrive with a P64 also.

The speed of a striped SSD drive is .........well ..........just beautiful, I love it. Instantaneous everything.

As for the Netbook, apart from the torturous dis-assembly, the difference is utterly staggering.
I use the Netbook as a sort of low power (as in Watts) server to run numerous 24/7 stuff at home, and it was beginning to suffer badly.
Until the SSD was shoved into its belly. It runs fast ....again, in fact much faster than it ever did. The CPU cooler fan does not seem to be on full time any-more, in fact I don't recall hearing it at all since the transplant. (note to self - check CPU fan working)

So ...........I supose what I am saying is.... at this price ..... Bloody Go for it.

64GB is more than enough to run your OS of choice and load it full of the essential junk one needs on a day to day basis - the rest of the rubbish you need - lob on an internal/external/nas/cloud drive.

A Warning though

After you try an SSD - all other computers are real slow. SSD's are the new Geek drug

You have been warned


Edited by: "kinell" 31st Jul 2010

Tempted... but I'm sticking to getting a crucial C300.

budmanuk

Tempted... but I'm sticking to getting a crucial C300.



I am really waiting for this:-
The SSD H. Grail

Just doing the re-mortgage paper work now

Edited by: "kinell" 31st Jul 2010

kinell

I am really waiting for this:-The SSD H. GrailJust doing the re-mortgage … I am really waiting for this:-The SSD H. GrailJust doing the re-mortgage paper work now:(




hahahah wtf!? thats obscene. 1000mb/s. I'll stick with the C300 thanks
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