Kingston Technology DataTraveler 32 GB Micro USB 3.1 Flash Drive £8.60 (prime) £12.59 (non prime) @ Amazon
318°Expired

Kingston Technology DataTraveler 32 GB Micro USB 3.1 Flash Drive £8.60 (prime) £12.59 (non prime) @ Amazon

18
Found 17th Aug 2015
Was looking to pick up another SE9 datatraveler, but this appears to fit the keys nicely and is about the same price as the 32gb SE9.

18 Comments

Looks very nice

100MB/s read, 15MB/s write (on the 32/64GB models), which are the same speeds as their larger SE9 G2 metal USB 3.0 sticks.
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 17th Aug 2015

OP .. I never realised there was a USB 3.1 Standard yet?, I always assumed 3.0?, or ..... :-)

amour3k

OP .. I never realised there was a USB 3.1 Standard yet?, I always … OP .. I never realised there was a USB 3.1 Standard yet?, I always assumed 3.0?, or ..... :-)


Yeah new standard, glad they're trying to push it already though - new handsets and motherboards have support already even if its not completely there yet. Was announced awhile ago but since motherboard were announced supporting it (as well as the new usb 3.1 type C connection) it's beginning to pick up pace.
http://i.imgur.com/UM8uDdz.png
http://www.synopsys.com/Company/Publications/DWTB/PublishingImages/dwtb-q4/dwtb-q414-usb3-table1.jpg

lol, you beat me to it. 3.1 standard finally introduced to the market this year. On paper it shows speeds of upto 10Gb/s. Its twice quicker than the old 3.0 standard which was 5Gb/s. then again, we havent even utilised full 5Gb/s bandwidth yet with USB flash drive. Unless you decide to use an SSD with R/W spec of 500MB/s or greater in a USB3.0 enclosure, then you'll max it out.

check out the spec sheet here: usb.org/dev…usb

USB3.1 is backward compatible with USB3.0 and USB2.0.

I can see USB flash drives becoming the norm for USB C-Type soon.

its usb 3.1 gen 1, and gen 1 has same speeds as usb 3.0

USB 3.0 was a major change to the spec. It introduced something called the “Extensible Host Controller Interface,” or xHCI, a single interface that could work with all extant versions of the USB spec. Supporting USB 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 previously required a mix of different interfaces, but xHCI brought them all together and made it easier to make future additions (hence “extensible”).

USB 3.1, by contrast, is a much smaller change—so much so that the USB 3.1 specification has actually absorbed the USB 3.0 spec. For whatever reason, this has led to some odd name changes. The 10Gbps version of USB 3.1 that you probably think of when you think about USB 3.1 is called “USB 3.1 Gen 2.”

USB 3.0 has retroactively been renamed “USB 3.1 Gen 1,” and it retains a theoretical transfer rate of 5.0 Gbps. The USB-IF has confirmed to us that “USB 3.1 Type 1” uses the same controllers as USB 3.0, so we can expect to see some early Broadwell-based Type C systems like the Retina MacBook come with “USB 3.1” even though they’re using what we have heretofore known as “USB 3.0” controllers. The new Chromebook Pixel, likewise, comes with these 5Gbps Type C ports, though Google’s spec sheet refers to them by speed rather than by a USB version.

If you really want USB 3.1 then you can buy a PCIe card for around £25 which will give you two sockets. One way of giving a USB 2 machine a longer useable life.

Dinth

USB 3.0 was a major change to the spec. It introduced something called … USB 3.0 was a major change to the spec. It introduced something called the “Extensible Host Controller Interface,” or xHCI, a single interface that could work with all extant versions of the USB spec. Supporting USB 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 previously required a mix of different interfaces, but xHCI brought them all together and made it easier to make future additions (hence “extensible”).USB 3.1, by contrast, is a much smaller change—so much so that the USB 3.1 specification has actually absorbed the USB 3.0 spec. For whatever reason, this has led to some odd name changes. The 10Gbps version of USB 3.1 that you probably think of when you think about USB 3.1 is called “USB 3.1 Gen 2.”USB 3.0 has retroactively been renamed “USB 3.1 Gen 1,” and it retains a theoretical transfer rate of 5.0 Gbps. The USB-IF has confirmed to us that “USB 3.1 Type 1” uses the same controllers as USB 3.0, so we can expect to see some early Broadwell-based Type C systems like the Retina MacBook come with “USB 3.1” even though they’re using what we have heretofore known as “USB 3.0” controllers. The new Chromebook Pixel, likewise, comes with these 5Gbps Type C ports, though Google’s spec sheet refers to them by speed rather than by a USB version.



To make it even more confusing there are also USB 2.0 speed type C ports on some things... oO

Horrorwood

To make it even more confusing there are also USB 2.0 speed type C ports … To make it even more confusing there are also USB 2.0 speed type C ports on some things... oO:|


Actually there are also Thunderbolt 2 and Thunderbolt 3 with USB-C connetors

u0421793

I’m glad they’ve solved the problem of there being too many differing sta … I’m glad they’ve solved the problem of there being too many differing standards, by introducing another one.


Relevant XKCD

Good price:D

I see they also have the Kingston Technology DataTraveler Micro Duo USB 3.1 Gen 1/USB 3.0 Flash Drive - 32 GB
for £9.02 (Prime) Its the OTG with USB ones. (Also Available on Amazon by another seller for £8.50 delivered)

If you don't have prime, you'd be better getting the Grixx: 7dayshop.com/pro…363

Double the write rate, so much faster transfers and double the capacity for only 20p more.

I can understand people might want this one for their keyrings, but if not the Grixx seems like a no-brainer.

Is there any difference between this and the DTSE9 G2 from Kingston?

I like USB

May as well not be on Prime because it takes 2-3 weeks to get dispatched.

£9.37 with flubit
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