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Kingston ValueRam 16 GB 1,333 MHz DDR3 Non-ECC DIMM Memory Kit (2 x 8 GB) £93.97 from Amazon
Kingston ValueRam 16 GB 1,333 MHz DDR3 Non-ECC DIMM Memory Kit (2 x 8 GB) £93.97 from Amazon

Kingston ValueRam 16 GB 1,333 MHz DDR3 Non-ECC DIMM Memory Kit (2 x 8 GB) £93.97 from Amazon

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It's clearly called ValueRam for a reason as the low spec makes it obvious it's not going to win any benchmark races, but this seems to be just about the cheapest 16GB DDR3 kit on the market right now at £5.87/GB.

Other stores stock it for £110-130 so that makes this a great deal.

Free delivery.

10 Comments

Nowhere better to find 8Gb for £47, if you got a buddy

eBay aren't approved for the all important life time warranties on these.

one link is a refurb and the other potentially a fake. it is suspiciously cheap. wouldn't trust to honor warranty.
Edited by: "zaphodbb" 22nd Dec 2014

Low profile, CL9, will you find 16GB at this speed for less? I doubt it.

However, 1600 is far more common and provides better value for money.

The chances are if your motherboard supports 1333, it will also support 1600. Even if your CPU limit is 1333, the RAM will still underclock at 1333 and it gives that tiny little bit extra room for upgrade - even though the difference between 1333 and 1600mhz is probably negligible at best.

What do you need 16gb of ram for anyway? Is the amount of free RAM really the bottleneck?

Good price for what it is, but I am sure there are better deals to be had here.

my 2*4 oc to 1600 with tighter timings

cdm30379

plenty cheaper branded … plenty cheaper branded stuffhttp://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/16GB-2-x-8GB-Crucial-DDR3-SDRAM-1333-MHz-DIMM-240-pin-Dual-Channel-RAM-Module-/141510860537?pt=UK_Computing_ComputerComponents_MemoryRAM_JN&hash=item20f2b45ef9http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/16GB-2x8GB-DDR3-1333-PC3-10600R-ECC-Registered-CL9-240-pin-DIMM-Memory-RAM-/221639049425?pt=UK_Computing_ComputerComponents_MemoryRAM_JN&hash=item339ab780d1



The 2nd one is server memory, so no use for the majority of people reading this. As for the first one, title says 2x8GB, but the description says 1x8GB, and the photo only has one 8GB module pictured, so I'd be sceptical about that one.

Good price. Heat added.

cdm30379

plenty cheaper branded … plenty cheaper branded stuffhttp://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/16GB-2-x-8GB-Crucial-DDR3-SDRAM-1333-MHz-DIMM-240-pin-Dual-Channel-RAM-Module-/141510860537?pt=UK_Computing_ComputerComponents_MemoryRAM_JN&hash=item20f2b45ef9http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/16GB-2x8GB-DDR3-1333-PC3-10600R-ECC-Registered-CL9-240-pin-DIMM-Memory-RAM-/221639049425?pt=UK_Computing_ComputerComponents_MemoryRAM_JN&hash=item339ab780d1


They are both Server memory.

It seems like memory is going up in price now. I bought 16GB of Kingston HyperX for about £40 to £50 a couple of years back

Original Poster

If anyone's wondering, "server memory" is SDRAM or "ECC registered" memory and that's incompatible with 95%+ of everyday computer motherboards. It's also very cheap second-hand because companies usually don't bother trying to maximise the resale price of stuff they're junking, they just call in somebody to take it all away, plus there's low demand for it because it can only fit in other servers.

For a normal desktop computer, you need "non-ECC" memory. Most take DDR3 (old computers take DDR2, some high-end new machines may take DDR4) but check your motherboard guide or PC spec sheet and it should tell you exactly what will work in yours.

Banned

Genki

If anyone's wondering, "server memory" is SDRAM or "ECC registered" … If anyone's wondering, "server memory" is SDRAM or "ECC registered" memory and that's incompatible with 95%+ of everyday computer motherboards. It's also very cheap second-hand because companies usually don't bother trying to maximise the resale price of stuff they're junking, they just call in somebody to take it all away, plus there's low demand for it because it can only fit in other servers.For a normal desktop computer, you need "non-ECC" memory. Most take DDR3 (old computers take DDR2, some high-end new machines may take DDR4) but check your motherboard guide or PC spec sheet and it should tell you exactly what will work in yours.



Actually in most cases unbuffered ECC will do just fine -- the ECC feature just won't be activated. It's the registered bit that'll foul things up. (Registered modules usually have ECC as well, but ECC memory doesn't in and of itself imply having registers.)
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