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Kitchen Garden Herb Planter Wood 3 Tier Growing Plant Stand Wooden Rack Outdoor £27.96 Del @ Ebay/Burwellshome
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Kitchen Garden Herb Planter Wood 3 Tier Growing Plant Stand Wooden Rack Outdoor £27.96 Del @ Ebay/Burwellshome

£27.96£39.9530%eBay Deals
68
Posted 11th Apr

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Been looking for a herb planter as difficult to find fresh herbs in the supermarket at the moment. Thought it was good value for what it is, along with trays, seeds and vermiculite. Most of the other similar ones I have looked at are £40-50 without the seeds and medium.

  • Wooden rack with 6 plastic seed trays
  • Includes 6 bags of growing medium (vermiculite) and 6 sachets of herb seed: Basil, Mint, Chives, Thyme, Parsley and Coriander
  • Suitable for indoor and outdoor use
  • Rack measures H63.5 x W41 x D34.5cm when assembled
  • Simple home assembly required
  • Three tier wooden herb rack with six plastic seed trays
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Top comments
extonjoe11/04/2020 14:49

Surely cheaper to just buy herbs in Tesco


Did you read the OP's first sentence?
I have been planting herbs and vegetables with my children and it keeps the entertained too. They are now making a chart when to water the plants and how they are growing.
extonjoe11/04/2020 14:49

Surely cheaper to just buy herbs in Tesco


Maybe so but over time this would end up cheaper if you keep it up, Also nice if you want to tone down how much plastic packaging you are buying.
popoyaya11/04/2020 21:39

Yep, almost £30 for a few sticks of wood nailed together and a few plastic …Yep, almost £30 for a few sticks of wood nailed together and a few plastic trays?


for most people who dont have a few sticks of wood around, to be able to cut them to size, assemble/build it, make those plastic containers fit in nicely and uniformly, spend a few hours to plan/build the thing. i think £30 is worth mainly the time/hassle and not the actual raw components themselves.
68 Comments
Surely cheaper to just buy herbs in Tesco
extonjoe11/04/2020 14:49

Surely cheaper to just buy herbs in Tesco


Did you read the OP's first sentence?
extonjoe11/04/2020 14:49

Surely cheaper to just buy herbs in Tesco


Maybe so but over time this would end up cheaper if you keep it up, Also nice if you want to tone down how much plastic packaging you are buying.
I have been planting herbs and vegetables with my children and it keeps the entertained too. They are now making a chart when to water the plants and how they are growing.
Just ordered this and then found this post.

seems a good price but I wonder about the quality as it is low cost.
Just vermiculite? No compost? You might be able to get them to germinate in just vermiculite, but good luck growing herbs to any useful size with no nutrients. I’d be very surprised if they look anything like what’s pictured. They probably just bought some herb plants for that photo.

In fact, I’m not sure I even recommend vermiculite for germination, as I recently experimented with germinating some herb seeds in another purely moisture retentive medium and then potted on with compost and the herbs still look straggly and weird. Not sure they’ll ever be harvestable. Most disappointing.

Also, different herbs have different requirements. Some like a lot of moisture, others hate it. Doubt you could get away with one pot for all.

Might work better with cress and other microgreens, as you harvest them pretty quickly, before they grow to a normal size.
How big is this? Could it fit on the windowsil?
Freddo_V_11/04/2020 19:24

How big is this? Could it fit on the windowsil?


It says it in the post amigo, too big for a windowsill I’d say
extonjoe11/04/2020 14:49

Surely cheaper to just buy herbs in Tesco


Probably not cheaper in the long run actually... I’ve had my herb garden for years, easily 10 years.
Freddo_V_11/04/2020 19:24

How big is this? Could it fit on the windowsil?


If you want to grow herbs on a windowsill you could use a yoghurt pot or an old shoe or a hat. Just put a bit of mud/compost in and sow some herb seeds
Thanks for the great find! I've been looking for something like this for quite some time
Seems relatively expensive to me...
asc199111/04/2020 21:19

Seems relatively expensive to me...


Yep, almost £30 for a few sticks of wood nailed together and a few plastic trays?
popoyaya11/04/2020 21:39

Yep, almost £30 for a few sticks of wood nailed together and a few plastic …Yep, almost £30 for a few sticks of wood nailed together and a few plastic trays?


for most people who dont have a few sticks of wood around, to be able to cut them to size, assemble/build it, make those plastic containers fit in nicely and uniformly, spend a few hours to plan/build the thing. i think £30 is worth mainly the time/hassle and not the actual raw components themselves.
popoyaya11/04/2020 21:39

Yep, almost £30 for a few sticks of wood nailed together and a few plastic …Yep, almost £30 for a few sticks of wood nailed together and a few plastic trays?


This is great news, how much will you charge me to knock me one up?
its a nicee idea and of course all garden centres, ikea etc have versions like this, anything to encourage a bit of home grown is good. If its a good starting point then all the better. But if you want herbs to grow they dont require much. A plastic pot some compost and water and some sun.

Even just buy or ask someone for a trimming from one of their herbs, put it in water for a cpl days, the roots srping, then plant in some soil, off you go.

Before you spend the money , just start small, a metal pot, even a tin can from your recycling, punch a hole or too in it and go. Buy a seed pack or whatever you want. I love doing the spring onion cast offs and how you can grow them again and again. Just you better like spring onions lol.


Do your best and dont stress
cheesefactortoys12/04/2020 00:15

its a nicee idea and of course all garden centres, ikea etc have versions …its a nicee idea and of course all garden centres, ikea etc have versions like this, anything to encourage a bit of home grown is good. If its a good starting point then all the better. But if you want herbs to grow they dont require much. A plastic pot some compost and water and some sun.Even just buy or ask someone for a trimming from one of their herbs, put it in water for a cpl days, the roots srping, then plant in some soil, off you go. Before you spend the money , just start small, a metal pot, even a tin can from your recycling, punch a hole or too in it and go. Buy a seed pack or whatever you want. I love doing the spring onion cast offs and how you can grow them again and again. Just you better like spring onions lol.Do your best and dont stress


I like the idea of tinned cans, but the reality isn’t so good. The moisture makes them rusty, and rusty means changing the pH of the soil. For most plants, they won’t like this. Some will love it, but I don’t think herbs will. And that’s the only thing you’d really want to try in a pot that compact. Or one of those dinky cacti, I suppose. Which, incidentally, like dry soil, right? But, that’s purely ornamental.

Lots of plastic pots work well, though. Like Pot Noodle pots.
blabbity11/04/2020 19:20

Just vermiculite? No compost? You might be able to get them to germinate …Just vermiculite? No compost? You might be able to get them to germinate in just vermiculite, but good luck growing herbs to any useful size with no nutrients. I’d be very surprised if they look anything like what’s pictured. They probably just bought some herb plants for that photo.In fact, I’m not sure I even recommend vermiculite for germination, as I recently experimented with germinating some herb seeds in another purely moisture retentive medium and then potted on with compost and the herbs still look straggly and weird. Not sure they’ll ever be harvestable. Most disappointing.Also, different herbs have different requirements. Some like a lot of moisture, others hate it. Doubt you could get away with one pot for all.Might work better with cress and other microgreens, as you harvest them pretty quickly, before they grow to a normal size.


So should I not use the vermiculite at all? What would you suggest ? Just using compost and planting the seeds init without any vermiculite? I’ve tried to grow herbs but failed so many times😞
afnoor12/04/2020 01:15

So should I not use the vermiculite at all? What would you suggest ? Just …So should I not use the vermiculite at all? What would you suggest ? Just using compost and planting the seeds init without any vermiculite? I’ve tried to grow herbs but failed so many times😞


I don’t think you need the vermiculite, but it can be added to compost to change the properties of it. I don’t bother using it, but then again I don’t grow every herb just for the sake of a complete set. I only grow a handful that I know I’ll use. None of those are the ones that like a hotter, drier climate. So, for all I know, the ones I haven’t bothered looking into how to grow might benefit from a bit of vermiculite (added to the compost). Regardless, I can’t give advice on growing herbs in general, as they’re all different and like different environments. How much light they need or can tolerate, pH levels of compost, constant access to moisture or not, cooler or hotter temperatures, greedy with nutrients or like being treated meaner, how much the roots need to spread or how much depth they need etc. It all depends on where the plant/herb comes from in the world.

I would only advise to pick one, look up how best to grow that one, and give it a go. Once you’ve nailed that one, pick another and repeat the process. You’ll soon realise that the advise for each is different and what you find works will differ. The only similar advice would probably be that they tend to need bigger pots than we’re all led to believe with images of neat little pots on a window sill and that the more you snip them, the more they’re encouraged to grow (within reason, you still need to leave like a third of the plant intact to carry on photosynthesising).

For example, tomatoes and peppers seem pretty similar. But, tomatoes can’t get enough water and peppers hate having wet roots and prefer to dry out between each watering. So, tomatoes can be quite happy with roots growing right into a water reservoir, whilst peppers could do with something added to the compost to improve drainage. Mint is more like tomatoes in this regard, but differs with nutrients needed, space for roots to spread, light levels, and temperature that it can tolerate. Maybe it’s because I’m already used to growing tomatoes, or maybe it’s because mint is almost a weed in our climate anyway, but I’ve found mint really easy to grow, so maybe that would be a good one to start with if you think you’ll use it?

My criticism with this isn’t that it includes vermiculite, but that it excludes compost and gives the impression that you can grow herbs in just vermiculite. Herbs need nutrients, which they won’t get from vermiculite on its own.
Love this. Will be an attractive addition to the garden whilst serving practically and saving money long term. The fact it comes with the seeds too is brilliant thanks op!
Buy a cheap small step ladder and place recycled plastic trays on the three steps. You then have a multi-use device! Grow herbs and change lightbulbs at the same time.
Tempted. 🔥
blabbity12/04/2020 00:41

I like the idea of tinned cans, but the reality isn’t so good. The m …I like the idea of tinned cans, but the reality isn’t so good. The moisture makes them rusty, and rusty means changing the pH of the soil. For most plants, they won’t like this. Some will love it, but I don’t think herbs will. And that’s the only thing you’d really want to try in a pot that compact. Or one of those dinky cacti, I suppose. Which, incidentally, like dry soil, right? But, that’s purely ornamental.Lots of plastic pots work well, though. Like Pot Noodle pots.


Cut the top of a water/pop bottle and use it as a pot that fits neatly inside the tin can
blabbity12/04/2020 02:37

I don’t think you need the vermiculite, but it can be added to compost to c …I don’t think you need the vermiculite, but it can be added to compost to change the properties of it. I don’t bother using it, but then again I don’t grow every herb just for the sake of a complete set. I only grow a handful that I know I’ll use. None of those are the ones that like a hotter, drier climate. So, for all I know, the ones I haven’t bothered looking into how to grow might benefit from a bit of vermiculite (added to the compost). Regardless, I can’t give advice on growing herbs in general, as they’re all different and like different environments. How much light they need or can tolerate, pH levels of compost, constant access to moisture or not, cooler or hotter temperatures, greedy with nutrients or like being treated meaner, how much the roots need to spread or how much depth they need etc. It all depends on where the plant/herb comes from in the world. I would only advise to pick one, look up how best to grow that one, and give it a go. Once you’ve nailed that one, pick another and repeat the process. You’ll soon realise that the advise for each is different and what you find works will differ. The only similar advice would probably be that they tend to need bigger pots than we’re all led to believe with images of neat little pots on a window sill and that the more you snip them, the more they’re encouraged to grow (within reason, you still need to leave like a third of the plant intact to carry on photosynthesising).For example, tomatoes and peppers seem pretty similar. But, tomatoes can’t get enough water and peppers hate having wet roots and prefer to dry out between each watering. So, tomatoes can be quite happy with roots growing right into a water reservoir, whilst peppers could do with something added to the compost to improve drainage. Mint is more like tomatoes in this regard, but differs with nutrients needed, space for roots to spread, light levels, and temperature that it can tolerate. Maybe it’s because I’m already used to growing tomatoes, or maybe it’s because mint is almost a weed in our climate anyway, but I’ve found mint really easy to grow, so maybe that would be a good one to start with if you think you’ll use it?My criticism with this isn’t that it includes vermiculite, but that it excludes compost and gives the impression that you can grow herbs in just vermiculite. Herbs need nutrients, which they won’t get from vermiculite on its own.


Thank you I’ll try vermiculite mixed with compost and take it one herb at a time mainly interested in growing coriander parsley and mint . Anyone know how to grow oregano in a pot?
Sorry if this sounds silly. A newbee here. Does this come with soil and everything else thats needed? I would like to keep myself sane with some gardening. Although I don't have a garden. Would this work in a balcony? Thanks
My neighbour said he was growing Herb, but since been arrested, and house empty. Shame. Real shame
snappyfish13/04/2020 08:44

My neighbour said he was growing Herb, but since been arrested, and house …My neighbour said he was growing Herb, but since been arrested, and house empty. Shame. Real shame


Anyone had their purchase delivered or even marked as dispatched yet?
Hello,

Thank you for your message.

I have just been advised by our warehouse that due to a recent server maintenance, our stock levels have not been updated and stock was wrongly allocated. Unfortunately, this item is currently out of stock.

I have been trying to sort out a new stock delivery, however, I currently have not yet heard back from our suppliers.

Therefore, in order to avoid any further delays, we have processed a refund for you.

I can assure you that none of this was anticipated and we would never deliberately and knowingly cause such an inconvenience to a customer.

I sincerely apologise for the delay in informing you.

Thank you very much for your kind understanding.

Kind regards,
George
phileep-philop16/04/2020 18:41

Hello,Thank you for your message.I have just been advised by our warehouse …Hello,Thank you for your message.I have just been advised by our warehouse that due to a recent server maintenance, our stock levels have not been updated and stock was wrongly allocated. Unfortunately, this item is currently out of stock.I have been trying to sort out a new stock delivery, however, I currently have not yet heard back from our suppliers.Therefore, in order to avoid any further delays, we have processed a refund for you.I can assure you that none of this was anticipated and we would never deliberately and knowingly cause such an inconvenience to a customer.I sincerely apologise for the delay in informing you.Thank you very much for your kind understanding.Kind regards,George


New it, as I said in an earlier post, easier and cheaper to get from Tesco already grown.
extonjoe16/04/2020 20:29

And quicker


Of course it’s quicker to buy already grown herbs than growing your own, but that’s not really the point. You can buy already cut fresh herbs too if you want to skip the snipping as well. But, a common complaint with pots of fresh herbs from supermarkets is that they die quite quickly. You can grow longer lasting herbs yourself, providing that you look after them and give them what they need... this set doesn’t provide them what they need, though.

Could just buy a pack of seeds, clean out an old plastic pot, poke some drainage holes in the base, get some soil from your garden, put together on your windowsill and give a water, and it would likely do a better job than this. Hell, if you wanted to save even more pennies, allow your existing herbs to bolt (for the benefit of gardening newbies, if you don’t keep on top of the snipping and the weather is warm, the plant will grow tall and flowers will form, followed by seeds) and collect the free seeds from it to use.

As far as I can tell, this is only worth getting if you really wanted a ladder stand and if you normally use loads of vermiculite. I bought just one bag of vermiculite last year and still have half a bag left... most of the ‘used’ vermiculite was actually just ‘cause I kept knocking the bledy bag over and spilling it everywhere anyway!
phileep-philop16/04/2020 18:41

Hello,Thank you for your message.I have just been advised by our warehouse …Hello,Thank you for your message.I have just been advised by our warehouse that due to a recent server maintenance, our stock levels have not been updated and stock was wrongly allocated. Unfortunately, this item is currently out of stock.I have been trying to sort out a new stock delivery, however, I currently have not yet heard back from our suppliers.Therefore, in order to avoid any further delays, we have processed a refund for you.I can assure you that none of this was anticipated and we would never deliberately and knowingly cause such an inconvenience to a customer.I sincerely apologise for the delay in informing you.Thank you very much for your kind understanding.Kind regards,George


Have you received a refund yet?
bluenitsuj20/04/2020 14:34

Have you received a refund yet?


I haven't received refund either... Same message received yesterday...
bluenitsuj20/04/2020 14:34

Have you received a refund yet?

No, and I even chased it and he said it will take a few days, when actually he just hasn’t triggered the refund/cancellation process. I’ve been an eBayer 20 years lol.

This “innocent” mistake seems to be taking a more sinister turn, I wish I wasn’t so skeptical but it’s not adding up.
B12M20/04/2020 19:18

I haven't received refund either... Same message received yesterday... …I haven't received refund either... Same message received yesterday...


No, and I even chased it and he said it will take a few days, when actually he just hasn’t triggered the refund/cancellation process. I’ve been an eBayer 20 years lol.

This “innocent” mistake seems to be taking a more sinister turn, I wish I wasn’t so skeptical but it’s not adding up.
phileep-philop20/04/2020 20:07

No, and I even chased it and he said it will take a few days, when …No, and I even chased it and he said it will take a few days, when actually he just hasn’t triggered the refund/cancellation process. I’ve been an eBayer 20 years lol. This “innocent” mistake seems to be taking a more sinister turn, I wish I wasn’t so skeptical but it’s not adding up.


Time to escalate I suppose. Shame, they've got a good feedback history too.
B12M20/04/2020 20:17

Time to escalate I suppose. Shame, they've got a good feedback history too.


Do you have to wait a certain amount of time before escalating?
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