Knauf 100mm Space Bottom Layer Loft Roll Insulation - 8.3m2 £12 A Roll @ Wickes - Free Click & Collect
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Knauf 100mm Space Bottom Layer Loft Roll Insulation - 8.3m2 £12 A Roll @ Wickes - Free Click & Collect

14
TODAYPosted 31st Oct
Good price on this stuff at Wickes. It's the 100mm bottom layer pack and they're on offer at £12 per roll until the 13th. It's getting colder now so if you're planning on sorting out the insulation, this is worth considering and carries good reviews.

Click & Collect is free

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  • Length: 7280 mm
  • Thickness: 100 mm
  • Width: 1140 mm
  • Material: Glass Mineral Wool
  • Usage: Loft insulation
  • Coverage: 8.3 m2
  • Fire Retardant: RTF Euroclass A1
  • Thermal Conductivity: 0.044 W/mK
  • Thermal Resistance R Value: 2.25
  • Pack Quantity: 1
  • Certifications Met: Ce Marked To Bs En 13162
  • Type: Loft Roll Insulation
  • Country Origin: uk
  • Brand Name: Knauf

Features & benefits
  • An eco-friendly glass mineral wool product with pre-cut perforations, enabling use between either 400mm or 600mm horizontal ceiling joists.
  • Made with ECOSE Technology - softer to handle compared to our traditional mineral wool
  • Partially cut and easy to lay between ceiling joists
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14 Comments
I first read that as "ROFL LOL" rather than loft roll....
davocc31/10/2019 11:17

I first read that as "ROFL LOL" rather than loft roll....


ROLF LOFT!
How does this bottom layer differ? is it more less water resistant? stronger?
Really good price. I bought 6 rolls of Knauf Eco roll from B&Q yesterday at their promo price of £16.50/each if you buy 3 rolls. By the looks of it, this stuff is identical - same length, width, thickness, precut and R value. Day late, (several) pound short... oh well.
HotUKDealSeeker31/10/2019 11:21

How does this bottom layer differ? is it more less water resistant? …How does this bottom layer differ? is it more less water resistant? stronger?


100mm designed to go between the joists, so the bottom layer. Top layer is 170mm and laid over the top in opposite direction.
HotUKDealSeeker31/10/2019 11:21

How does this bottom layer differ? is it more less water resistant? …How does this bottom layer differ? is it more less water resistant? stronger?


100mm is the depth not width, would be strange to have 100mm wide joists. But the rest is right. Goes to the top of the average joist
kel6431/10/2019 12:01

100mm designed to go between the joists, so the bottom layer. Top layer is …100mm designed to go between the joists, so the bottom layer. Top layer is 170mm and laid over the top in opposite direction.

There’s nothing stopping me from getting a load of this and making them 300mm high at 3 layers deep right?
HotUKDealSeeker31/10/2019 12:56

There’s nothing stopping me from getting a load of this and making them 3 …There’s nothing stopping me from getting a load of this and making them 300mm high at 3 layers deep right?



Also wanting to know this. I've got an old layer of insulation professionally installed by previous owner, would rather not rip all that up and relay, just lay new stuff on top, is that allowed / a problem? Can I use this stuff, does it have to be the bottom layer?
dannymccann31/10/2019 13:58

Also wanting to know this. I've got an old layer of insulation …Also wanting to know this. I've got an old layer of insulation professionally installed by previous owner, would rather not rip all that up and relay, just lay new stuff on top, is that allowed / a problem? Can I use this stuff, does it have to be the bottom layer?


of course 'its allowed' lol
tfish31/10/2019 16:00

of course 'its allowed' lol



As in won't cause damp / condensation to build up etc, given that it is called a bottom layer?
HotUKDealSeeker31/10/2019 12:56

There’s nothing stopping me from getting a load of this and making them 3 …There’s nothing stopping me from getting a load of this and making them 300mm high at 3 layers deep right?


I believe it's all the same stuff and wouldn't be any different. The 100mm is normally for between the joists at 2x4" and then at right angles on top of that with 170mm or 200mm. At this price it works out:
100mm at 200mm thick = £2.89m²
200mm at 200mm thick = £3.56m²

So works out cheaper to get 3 layers of 100mm rather than 100mm then 200mm on top of you're completely replacing the insulation. I believe anything above 300mm thick the heat loss is almost negligible so not worth it.

P.s. if you want to do loft storage with 300mm insulation (100mm and then 200mm over the joists) if you use the loft legs they're normally only 170mm high, really you want them higher as it will compress the insulation underneath, and ideally you want an air gap between the insulation and underside of the loft boards. I used 230mm offcuts of CLS studwork as it's cheap and screwed them in at angles to the joists below. You'd want at least on the corners of each board and some more half way. You can screw the loft board into the cls and only using minimal screws and glueing the t&g boards together the whole thing was extremely rigid and shared the weight of everything across many joists. If anybody's interested in doing it and wants any more info let me know.
Vawallpa31/10/2019 19:15

I believe it's all the same stuff and wouldn't be any different. The 100mm …I believe it's all the same stuff and wouldn't be any different. The 100mm is normally for between the joists at 2x4" and then at right angles on top of that with 170mm or 200mm. At this price it works out:100mm at 200mm thick = £2.89m²200mm at 200mm thick = £3.56m²So works out cheaper to get 3 layers of 100mm rather than 100mm then 200mm on top of you're completely replacing the insulation. I believe anything above 300mm thick the heat loss is almost negligible so not worth it.P.s. if you want to do loft storage with 300mm insulation (100mm and then 200mm over the joists) if you use the loft legs they're normally only 170mm high, really you want them higher as it will compress the insulation underneath, and ideally you want an air gap between the insulation and underside of the loft boards. I used 230mm offcuts of CLS studwork as it's cheap and screwed them in at angles to the joists below. You'd want at least on the corners of each board and some more half way. You can screw the loft board into the cls and only using minimal screws and glueing the t&g boards together the whole thing was extremely rigid and shared the weight of everything across many joists. If anybody's interested in doing it and wants any more info let me know.


Sounds interesting! Great work.
Great price OP collected a few at £12 thanks
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