KTC Pure Butter Ghee 2KG - £7 @ ASDA
-6°Expired

KTC Pure Butter Ghee 2KG - £7 @ ASDA

32
Found 12th Oct 2015
lowest I have seen in last 2-3 years including Asian stores

also available 1 Kg for 4 pounds

online and in store

32 Comments

why cold

Banned

This stuff makes you really fat

Original Poster

hmm121

why cold


Don't know, If there is any other deal posted, I would like to withdraw, as far as I searched , did not get any deal on this.

isnt ghee a musical drama on sky

snowflake75

isnt ghee a musical drama on sky



That's Glee! X)

Great deal

I use this instead of normal butter and it's YUMMY.

someguy003

This stuff makes you really fat



So does a lot of other things, ghee is more purer than spread. and many other butters.

hmm121

why cold



I could give you a couple of guesses

why cold? this is a cracking deal. I just bloody paid 12 quid for this. heat added

cheapest I have bought this is for £7.50 couple of months ago from Wolverhampton Asian market and normally price ranges from £9 to £12. People who are voting cold either they they don't know what GHEE is or what a good deal is...

Ah, Last Tango in Paris........

Great price for this

if you really want a heart attack use this ghee. it will block your heart arteries.

Banned

Ranjd

So does a lot of other things, ghee is more purer than spread. and many … So does a lot of other things, ghee is more purer than spread. and many other butters.


Ghee is used for cooking not butter and there are a lot of cooking oils better than ghee. Sunflower, olive, sesame, rapeseed. Even compared butters, it fares badly. It has a high content cholesterol and trans fats, and low in polyunsaturated. If you want a healthy butter, there is Pro-activ and Benecol. I don't think there is any reason to be using ghee these days for anything.

someguy003

Ghee is used for cooking not butter and there are a lot of cooking oils … Ghee is used for cooking not butter and there are a lot of cooking oils better than ghee. Sunflower, olive, sesame, rapeseed. Even compared butters, it fares badly. It has a high content cholesterol and trans fats, and low in polyunsaturated. If you want a healthy butter, there is Pro-activ and Benecol. I don't think there is any reason to be using ghee these days for anything.



No. This is not correct. For cooking, with a higher smoke point (which means the oil is not converted to free radicals), ghee is way superior to sunflower and olive oils. Rapeseed and sesame oils do have higher smoke points which make them suitable for high heat - frying, baking - but nutritionally, it could be argued that ghee, if sourced from grass -fed cows, is again a better alternative.

mazziqbal

if you really want a heart attack use this ghee. it will block your heart … if you really want a heart attack use this ghee. it will block your heart arteries.



Seriously! High carbohydrate diets lead to heart attacks. The belief that saturated fat led to heart disease was completely debunked years ago. That it hasn't filtered down to the public conciousness still, is because they still want to profit from ignorance. Kellogg's anyone. Mmmmm.

Banned

bruuv

No. This is not correct. For cooking, with a higher smoke point (which … No. This is not correct. For cooking, with a higher smoke point (which means the oil is not converted to free radicals), ghee is way superior to sunflower and olive oils. Rapeseed and sesame oils do have higher smoke points which make them suitable for high heat - frying, baking - but nutritionally, it could be argued that ghee, if sourced from grass -fed cows, is again a better alternative.


What you are saying is not correct. Whilst you may get decomposition when you heat anything, any free radical formation will always be less harmful in polyunsaturated molecule (be it fats or any other molecule), The conjugated alkene system of unsaturated fats provides for a canonical stabilised radical. In saturated fats, free radical formation cannot be stabilised via canonical forms because there is no double bond conjugated system to stabilise it. It only has a weakly stabilisation system of hyperconjugation (also available to unsaturated fats). Hence a more potent radical is formed. Radicals aside, ghee has a higher cholesterol content and saturated fat content. Olive, rape seed, sesame are plant oils. They ain't been through any cow. These are way more healthy than anything coming out of a cow orifice.

.[/quote]What you are saying is not correct. Whilst you may get decomposition when you heat anything, any free radical formation will always be less harmful in polyunsaturated molecule (be it fats or any other molecule), The conjugated alkene system of unsaturated fats provides for a canonical stabilised radical. In saturated fats, free radical formation cannot be stabilised via canonical forms because there is no double bond conjugated system to stabilise it. It only has a weakly stabilisation system of hyperconjugation (also available to unsaturated fats). Hence a more potent radical is formed. Radicals aside, ghee has a higher cholesterol content and saturated fat content. Olive, rape seed, sesame are plant oils. They ain't been through any cow. These are way more healthy than anything coming out of a cow orifice.[/quote]

OK. First, higher cholesterol and saturated fat are not indicators of poorer nutrition; this is an outdated paradigm from the '70's promoting high carb/low fat diets. How's that diabetes epidemic going?
Assuming your molecular chemistry is correct though, I argue that heating saturated fats below smoke point means that no free radicals are created, unlike cooking with the choices you suggest. So no free radicals (ghee) versus some less potent/harmful radicals (plant oils). The maths seems to support my position rather than yours.
This is not to say that plant oils are not nutritious, however I have clearly referred to the use of these oils for cooking. Eating raw, unprocessed oils is a different matter - my personal favourites are coconut, olive and linseed. I never use olive oil for high heat cooking.

The poor cow seems maligned. I cannot determine whether this is a pro-plant/anti-meat issue. However, if a cow's teat is considered an orifice, god help those of us who have been breast fed.

Banned

bruuv

.

What you are saying is not correct. Whilst you may get decomposition when you heat anything, any free radical formation will always be less harmful in polyunsaturated molecule (be it fats or any other molecule), The conjugated alkene system of unsaturated fats provides for a canonical stabilised radical. In saturated fats, free radical formation cannot be stabilised via canonical forms because there is no double bond conjugated system to stabilise it. It only has a weakly stabilisation system of hyperconjugation (also available to unsaturated fats). Hence a more potent radical is formed. Radicals aside, ghee has a higher cholesterol content and saturated fat content. Olive, rape seed, sesame are plant oils. They ain't been through any cow. These are way more healthy than anything coming out of a cow orifice.[/quote]
OK. First, higher cholesterol and saturated fat are not indicators of poorer nutrition; this is an outdated paradigm from the '70's promoting high carb/low fat diets. How's that diabetes epidemic going?
Assuming your molecular chemistry is correct though, I argue that heating saturated fats below smoke point means that no free radicals are created, unlike cooking with the choices you suggest. So no free radicals (ghee) versus some less potent/harmful radicals (plant oils). The maths seems to support my position rather than yours.
This is not to say that plant oils are not nutritious, however I have clearly referred to the use of these oils for cooking. Eating raw, unprocessed oils is a different matter - my personal favourites are coconut, olive and linseed. I never use olive oil for high heat cooking.
The poor cow seems maligned. I cannot determine whether this is a pro-plant/anti-meat issue. However, if a cow's teat is considered an orifice, god help those of us who have been breast fed.[/quote]
No, this is simply inaccurate at a scientific level. Heating anything to any temperature will cause decomposition whether it is "smoke point" or not. Free radical formation is just one of the decomposition products that may result- there are many others. Free radical formation is happening with you and me right now. I don't know about you, but I an not sitting on a stove or in an oven. Heating will increase free radical formation and other harmful products. When something like free radical formation happens, unsaturated fats fair better compared to saturated fats because of their molecular design. As for you assumption about high fat diets: I would remind you that atherosclerotic plaques contain a high percentage of cholesterol. Where did all that cholesterol come from? The molecular structure properties of cholesterol, saturated fats and trans fat make them easy to "stack together" so forming a plaque. Unsaturated fats, especially Cis-fats are difficult to "stack" together and are ,hence, healthier. There are no hard and fast rules about who can eat fats because we are all different. We process fats differently. However, statistically speaking, high cholesterol and unsaturated fat diets, like those in ghee will make you fat. This observation has been seen in animal models and humans. It is true that some oils found in plants are unhealthy like coconut oil contains high levels of a sat fat called palmitic acid. But, ghee is far worse than this. As for diabetes, this too is aided by such unhealthy fats. A process called neoglucogenesis can break such fats down and stick them in "reverse glucolysis" resulting in high blood sugar. So there as well, unhealthy high fat diets present a problem . Just for the record, I do not believe high protein diets are good for the body either- maybe you can lose weight but the impact of just proteins your bloodstream can lead to all sorts of deficiencies.

LOL

I've never know some guy to be so serious about butter! I might take up trainspotting. haha
Edited by: "Ranjd" 13th Oct 2015

mazziqbal

if you really want a heart attack use this ghee. it will block your heart … if you really want a heart attack use this ghee. it will block your heart arteries.


(_;)
simply not true.

ssc1

(_;)simply not true.



Well at least know how to stop heart attacks haha

Banned

Ranjd

LOLI've never know some guy to be so serious about butter! I might take … LOLI've never know some guy to be so serious about butter! I might take up trainspotting. haha


The poster bruuv was making a scientific point about oil decomposition and the formation of free radicals. However, his assumptions were inaccurate at a basic science level.

someguy003

What you are saying is not correct. Whilst you may get decomposition when … What you are saying is not correct. Whilst you may get decomposition when you heat anything, any free radical formation will always be less harmful in polyunsaturated molecule (be it fats or any other molecule), The conjugated alkene system of unsaturated fats provides for a canonical stabilised radical. In saturated fats, free radical formation cannot be stabilised via canonical forms because there is no double bond conjugated system to stabilise it. It only has a weakly stabilisation system of hyperconjugation (also available to unsaturated fats). Hence a more potent radical is formed. Radicals aside, ghee has a higher cholesterol content and saturated fat content. Olive, rape seed, sesame are plant oils. They ain't been through any cow. These are way more healthy than anything coming out of a cow orifice.

OK. First, higher cholesterol and saturated fat are not indicators of poorer nutrition; this is an outdated paradigm from the '70's promoting high carb/low fat diets. How's that diabetes epidemic going?
Assuming your molecular chemistry is correct though, I argue that heating saturated fats below smoke point means that no free radicals are created, unlike cooking with the choices you suggest. So no free radicals (ghee) versus some less potent/harmful radicals (plant oils). The maths seems to support my position rather than yours.
This is not to say that plant oils are not nutritious, however I have clearly referred to the use of these oils for cooking. Eating raw, unprocessed oils is a different matter - my personal favourites are coconut, olive and linseed. I never use olive oil for high heat cooking.
The poor cow seems maligned. I cannot determine whether this is a pro-plant/anti-meat issue. However, if a cow's teat is considered an orifice, god help those of us who have been breast fed.[/quote]No, this is simply inaccurate at a scientific level. Heating anything to any temperature will cause decomposition whether it is "smoke point" or not. Free radical formation is just one of the decomposition products that may result- there are many others. Free radical formation is happening with you and me right now. I don't know about you, but I an not sitting on a stove or in an oven. Heating will increase free radical formation and other harmful products. When something like free radical formation happens, unsaturated fats fair better compared to saturated fats because of their molecular design. As for you assumption about high fat diets: I would remind you that atherosclerotic plaques contain a high percentage of cholesterol. Where did all that cholesterol come from? The molecular structure properties of cholesterol, saturated fats and trans fat make them easy to "stack together" so forming a plaque. Unsaturated fats, especially Cis-fats are difficult to "stack" together and are ,hence, healthier. There are no hard and fast rules about who can eat fats because we are all different. We process fats differently. However, statistically speaking, high cholesterol and unsaturated fat diets, like those in ghee will make you fat. This observation has been seen in animal models and humans. It is true that some oils found in plants are unhealthy like coconut oil contains high levels of a sat fat called palmitic acid. But, ghee is far worse than this. As for diabetes, this too is aided by such unhealthy fats. A process called neoglucogenesis can break such fats down and stick them in "reverse glucolysis" resulting in high blood sugar. So there as well, unhealthy high fat diets present a problem . Just for the record, I do not believe high protein diets are good for the body either- maybe you can lose weight but the impact of just proteins your bloodstream can lead to all sorts of deficiencies.[/quote]

Some of your conclusion are definitely incorrect. That said, we are not that far apart, but it seems we are approaching this from very different angles.

Free radical formation happens within us constantly. Agreed.
Heating increases free radical formation. Agreed.
When free radical formation happens, unsaturated fats fair better that saturated. Conceded this in the last post, happy to do so again..

None of this negates the fact that as saturated fats is more stable at greater heat, significantly less free radicals are produced at any given high heat than unsaturated fat. The maths is the maths.

I'm glad you refer to atherosclerosis as this is of particular interest to me.
Plaques contain high percentage of cholesterol. Agreed. Spot on. In response to damage to the endothelium, the body uses cholesterol to cover lesions in the arteries, and, in turn, calcium to coat these plaques to prevent their migration, which would cause a stroke or heart attack.
Where does this chlorestorol come from? Excess consumption of carbohydrates leads directly to the formation of the smaller high density LDLs that cause this damage. Not a high fat diet. A high carb diet.

Coconut oil is unhealthy. Not true. Statistically speaking there are no studies that have demonstrated a link between saturated fat/ high cholesterol diet and obesity or heart disease. The previous studies were associational, not causation based, and has been the basis of medical training for the past forty years, and continue to be basis of nutritional advice in the West, despite long being debunked. Harvard Medical School, once a proponent of your position, have recently retracted their advice on saturated fat.

Diabetes (T2) is a condition of insulin resistance. Fats, whether deemed healthy or unhealthy, have no effect on insulin production. The over consumption of carbohydrates, leads to the increase of insulin production, which encourages storage of fat in the body, including the liver and pancreas, until the body is overwhelmed and the process of glucose transportation into the cells is impaired and the sugar remains in your bloodstream, causing all types of other problems from blindness to ... atherosclerosis. Not sat fat.

High fat diet is unhealthy. Not true, though again consistent with standard BMA advice. Indeed, the best method to alleviate diabetes, is to consume a HFLC diet - high fat (70% + of calories), low carb (< 25 g/day), moderate protein, which will encourage the body to move into a ketogenic state, and utilise fat as the primary fuel for the body. I appreciate that the last sentence is completely at odds with your world view, but it is not my intention to cause you a stroke! I hope any plaques you may have remain stable while reading this. (For this reason, I won't go into Intermittent Fasting as treatment for diabetes...).

High fat + high sugar will kill you. I trust we can both agree on this.
High protein diet not good for you. Agreed also.

Just because I disagree with your positions, doesn't mean that I do not respect or acknowledge your views, or the source of them. Indeed, my GP would love you, and you seem to come from a informed traditional medical or science educated background. Your responses have been consistently intelligently presented and, in comparison to many of the debates on HUKD, this has been a delight.

I used to share your belief system, but though widely shared and promoted in all our media, it is truly deeply outdated. Lipo-phobia is the default position in the UK. Look around you. Is the low-fat, high (complex) carb advice working for obesity, heart disease, diabetes, or is the population getting generally fatter and unhealthier?
We may never agree, and a paradigm shift this severe can prove difficult - "Pfft, fat causes fat, it's obvious. This guy's a nutter!". In my defence, I have done extensive research and "walk the walk" through my own consumption. Don't let the BMA, BBC, Kelloggs, Coco-Cola, grain producers, etc. fool you. Follow the money - who is funding the studies that you may rely on. The internet can be a powerful resource, as well as many published works in the bookshops, and if you choose to, you will find many better qualified than I who can point out the scientific facts behind my assertions.

Or not. Blue pill, red pill. You decide. Next week, carbs in, carbs out - best joke ever? All the best.

Banned

bruuv

OK. First, higher cholesterol and saturated fat are not indicators of … OK. First, higher cholesterol and saturated fat are not indicators of poorer nutrition; this is an outdated paradigm from the '70's promoting high carb/low fat diets. How's that diabetes epidemic going? Assuming your molecular chemistry is correct though, I argue that heating saturated fats below smoke point means that no free radicals are created, unlike cooking with the choices you suggest. So no free radicals (ghee) versus some less potent/harmful radicals (plant oils). The maths seems to support my position rather than yours. This is not to say that plant oils are not nutritious, however I have clearly referred to the use of these oils for cooking. Eating raw, unprocessed oils is a different matter - my personal favourites are coconut, olive and linseed. I never use olive oil for high heat cooking.The poor cow seems maligned. I cannot determine whether this is a pro-plant/anti-meat issue. However, if a cow's teat is considered an orifice, god help those of us who have been breast fed.

No, this is simply inaccurate at a scientific level. Heating anything to any temperature will cause decomposition whether it is "smoke point" or not. Free radical formation is just one of the decomposition products that may result- there are many others. Free radical formation is happening with you and me right now. I don't know about you, but I an not sitting on a stove or in an oven. Heating will increase free radical formation and other harmful products. When something like free radical formation happens, unsaturated fats fair better compared to saturated fats because of their molecular design. As for you assumption about high fat diets: I would remind you that atherosclerotic plaques contain a high percentage of cholesterol. Where did all that cholesterol come from? The molecular structure properties of cholesterol, saturated fats and trans fat make them easy to "stack together" so forming a plaque. Unsaturated fats, especially Cis-fats are difficult to "stack" together and are ,hence, healthier. There are no hard and fast rules about who can eat fats because we are all different. We process fats differently. However, statistically speaking, high cholesterol and unsaturated fat diets, like those in ghee will make you fat. This observation has been seen in animal models and humans. It is true that some oils found in plants are unhealthy like coconut oil contains high levels of a sat fat called palmitic acid. But, ghee is far worse than this. As for diabetes, this too is aided by such unhealthy fats. A process called neoglucogenesis can break such fats down and stick them in "reverse glucolysis" resulting in high blood sugar. So there as well, unhealthy high fat diets present a problem . Just for the record, I do not believe high protein diets are good for the body either- maybe you can lose weight but the impact of just proteins your bloodstream can lead to all sorts of deficiencies.[/quote]
Some of your conclusion are definitely incorrect. That said, we are not that far apart, but it seems we are approaching this from very different angles.
Free radical formation happens within us constantly. Agreed.
Heating increases free radical formation. Agreed.
When free radical formation happens, unsaturated fats fair better that saturated. Conceded this in the last post, happy to do so again..
None of this negates the fact that as saturated fats is more stable at greater heat, significantly less free radicals are produced at any given high heat than unsaturated fat. The maths is the maths.
I'm glad you refer to atherosclerosis as this is of particular interest to me.
Plaques contain high percentage of cholesterol. Agreed. Spot on. In response to damage to the endothelium, the body uses cholesterol to cover lesions in the arteries, and, in turn, calcium to coat these plaques to prevent their migration, which would cause a stroke or heart attack.
Where does this chlorestorol come from? Excess consumption of carbohydrates leads directly to the formation of the smaller high density LDLs that cause this damage. Not a high fat diet. A high carb diet.
Coconut oil is unhealthy. Not true. Statistically speaking there are no studies that have demonstrated a link between saturated fat/ high cholesterol diet and obesity or heart disease. The previous studies were associational, not causation based, and has been the basis of medical training for the past forty years, and continue to be basis of nutritional advice in the West, despite long being debunked. Harvard Medical School, once a proponent of your position, have recently retracted their advice on saturated fat.
Diabetes (T2) is a condition of insulin resistance. Fats, whether deemed healthy or unhealthy, have no effect on insulin production. The over consumption of carbohydrates, leads to the increase of insulin production, which encourages storage of fat in the body, including the liver and pancreas, until the body is overwhelmed and the process of glucose transportation into the cells is impaired and the sugar remains in your bloodstream, causing all types of other problems from blindness to ... atherosclerosis. Not sat fat.
High fat diet is unhealthy. Not true, though again consistent with standard BMA advice. Indeed, the best method to alleviate diabetes, is to consume a HFLC diet - high fat (70% + of calories), low carb (< 25 g/day), moderate protein, which will encourage the body to move into a ketogenic state, and utilise fat as the primary fuel for the body. I appreciate that the last sentence is completely at odds with your world view, but it is not my intention to cause you a stroke! I hope any plaques you may have remain stable while reading this. (For this reason, I won't go into Intermittent Fasting as treatment for diabetes...).
High fat + high sugar will kill you. I trust we can both agree on this.
High protein diet not good for you. Agreed also.
Just because I disagree with your positions, doesn't mean that I do not respect or acknowledge your views, or the source of them. Indeed, my GP would love you, and you seem to come from a informed traditional medical or science educated background. Your responses have been consistently intelligently presented and, in comparison to many of the debates on HUKD, this has been a delight.
I used to share your belief system, but though widely shared and promoted in all our media, it is truly deeply outdated. Lipo-phobia is the default position in the UK. Look around you. Is the low-fat, high (complex) carb advice working for obesity, heart disease, diabetes, or is the population getting generally fatter and unhealthier?
We may never agree, and a paradigm shift this severe can prove difficult - "Pfft, fat causes fat, it's obvious. This guy's a nutter!". In my defence, I have done extensive research and "walk the walk" through my own consumption. Don't let the BMA, BBC, Kelloggs, Coco-Cola, grain producers, etc. fool you. Follow the money - who is funding the studies that you may rely on. The internet can be a powerful resource, as well as many published works in the bookshops, and if you choose to, you will find many better qualified than I who can point out the scientific facts behind my assertions.
Or not. Blue pill, red pill. You decide. Next week, carbs in, carbs out - best joke ever? All the best.[/quote]

You are fixated on free radicals. Free radicals, as damaging as they are, exist in fat in minute quantities. Furthermore, their ability to inflict cellular damage as free radicals is not that great compared to say, a dioxygen radical, which is very damaging to cells and DNA. The trouble with ghee is, as you say, that the fat molecules (sat fats and cholesterol) are stable. It cannot be metabolised so it cannot be cleared from the body. It starts to stack up to form atherosclerotic plaques. This is far far more damaging than anything tiny amounts of free radicals in healthy oil could do. The perfect fat molecule is one that, if it becomes a radical, it is a stable radical. But, it needs to have sufficient reactivity to be metabolised- so it does not accumulate in the body. Polyunsaturates and Cis-fatty acids in olive, rapeseed, sunflower oil meet this criteria perfectly. Those found in ghee do not. As for coconut oil- yes this is a healthy oil as well. I was just saying that has a high content of palmitic acid which is a saturated fat., which is very calorific. But, again when comparing coconut oil to the dreadful ghee- coconut oil wins hands down. I agree there is a lot of misinformation around and a lot of private agendas around. But, the advice I would give you is simple. Stay the hell away from ghee!!!

[/quote]
You are fixated on free radicals. Free radicals, as damaging as they are, exist in fat in minute quantities. Furthermore, their ability to inflict cellular damage as free radicals is not that great compared to say, a dioxygen radical, which is very damaging to cells and DNA. The trouble with ghee is, as you say, that the fat molecules (sat fats and cholesterol) are stable. It cannot be metabolised so it cannot be cleared from the body. It starts to stack up to form atherosclerotic plaques. This is far far more damaging than anything tiny amounts of free radicals in healthy oil could do. The perfect fat molecule is one that, if it becomes a radical, it is a stable radical. But, it needs to have sufficient reactivity to be metabolised- so it does not accumulate in the body. Polyunsaturates and Cis-fatty acids in olive, rapeseed, sunflower oil meet this criteria perfectly. Those found in ghee do not. As for coconut oil- yes this is a healthy oil as well. I was just saying that has a high content of palmitic acid which is a saturated fat., which is very calorific. But, again when comparing coconut oil to the dreadful ghee- coconut oil wins hands down. I agree there is a lot of misinformation around and a lot of private agendas around. But, the advice I would give you is simple. Stay the hell away from ghee!!![/quote]


Hi again.
Not fixated on free radicals, certainly not a major issue for me - you brought this up to make the point about plant fats being healthier than saturated fat, I was merely responding. You may have noticed several other points in my long diatribe.
Plaques form due to response to damage to the endothelium - from excess sugar intake, smoking, etc. No damage, no atherosclerosis. Stating saturated fats stack up to form plaques if they are eaten in excess, with no reference to endothelium damage is scientifically wrong. Ask an eskimo.
Olive oil is good food, better still if not used for cooking. Palmitic acid is not more calorific than other fats. Sunflower oil is rubbish, with an extremely poor ratio of Omega 3 to Omega 6 oils.
I agree with you - the level of misinformation is criminal. The advice I would give is, like yours, very simple. "Saturated fat is bad for you" is a big fat nonsense, with absolutely no scientific basis. If you wish to use oil for cooking, ghee is far superior to sunflower oil!

karlypants

That's Glee! X)



​lol i know

bruuv

If you wish to use oil for cooking, ghee is far superior to sunflower oil![/quote]

Agree totally.

someguy003

No, this is simply inaccurate at a scientific level. Heating anything to … No, this is simply inaccurate at a scientific level. Heating anything to any temperature will cause decomposition whether it is "smoke point" or not. Free radical formation is just one of the decomposition products that may result- there are many others. Free radical formation is happening with you and me right now. I don't know about you, but I an not sitting on a stove or in an oven. Heating will increase free radical formation and other harmful products. When something like free radical formation happens, unsaturated fats fair better compared to saturated fats because of their molecular design. As for you assumption about high fat diets: I would remind you that atherosclerotic plaques contain a high percentage of cholesterol. Where did all that cholesterol come from? The molecular structure properties of cholesterol, saturated fats and trans fat make them easy to "stack together" so forming a plaque. Unsaturated fats, especially Cis-fats are difficult to "stack" together and are ,hence, healthier. There are no hard and fast rules about who can eat fats because we are all different. We process fats differently. However, statistically speaking, high cholesterol and unsaturated fat diets, like those in ghee will make you fat. This observation has been seen in animal models and humans. It is true that some oils found in plants are unhealthy like coconut oil contains high levels of a sat fat called palmitic acid. But, ghee is far worse than this. As for diabetes, this too is aided by such unhealthy fats. A process called neoglucogenesis can break such fats down and stick them in "reverse glucolysis" resulting in high blood sugar. So there as well, unhealthy high fat diets present a problem . Just for the record, I do not believe high protein diets are good for the body either- maybe you can lose weight but the impact of just proteins your bloodstream can lead to all sorts of deficiencies.


Some of your conclusion are definitely incorrect. That said, we are not that far apart, but it seems we are approaching this from very different angles.
Free radical formation happens within us constantly. Agreed.
Heating increases free radical formation. Agreed.
When free radical formation happens, unsaturated fats fair better that saturated. Conceded this in the last post, happy to do so again..
None of this negates the fact that as saturated fats is more stable at greater heat, significantly less free radicals are produced at any given high heat than unsaturated fat. The maths is the maths.
I'm glad you refer to atherosclerosis as this is of particular interest to me.
Plaques contain high percentage of cholesterol. Agreed. Spot on. In response to damage to the endothelium, the body uses cholesterol to cover lesions in the arteries, and, in turn, calcium to coat these plaques to prevent their migration, which would cause a stroke or heart attack.
Where does this chlorestorol come from? Excess consumption of carbohydrates leads directly to the formation of the smaller high density LDLs that cause this damage. Not a high fat diet. A high carb diet.
Coconut oil is unhealthy. Not true. Statistically speaking there are no studies that have demonstrated a link between saturated fat/ high cholesterol diet and obesity or heart disease. The previous studies were associational, not causation based, and has been the basis of medical training for the past forty years, and continue to be basis of nutritional advice in the West, despite long being debunked. Harvard Medical School, once a proponent of your position, have recently retracted their advice on saturated fat.
Diabetes (T2) is a condition of insulin resistance. Fats, whether deemed healthy or unhealthy, have no effect on insulin production. The over consumption of carbohydrates, leads to the increase of insulin production, which encourages storage of fat in the body, including the liver and pancreas, until the body is overwhelmed and the process of glucose transportation into the cells is impaired and the sugar remains in your bloodstream, causing all types of other problems from blindness to ... atherosclerosis. Not sat fat.
High fat diet is unhealthy. Not true, though again consistent with standard BMA advice. Indeed, the best method to alleviate diabetes, is to consume a HFLC diet - high fat (70% + of calories), low carb (< 25 g/day), moderate protein, which will encourage the body to move into a ketogenic state, and utilise fat as the primary fuel for the body. I appreciate that the last sentence is completely at odds with your world view, but it is not my intention to cause you a stroke! I hope any plaques you may have remain stable while reading this. (For this reason, I won't go into Intermittent Fasting as treatment for diabetes...).
High fat + high sugar will kill you. I trust we can both agree on this.
High protein diet not good for you. Agreed also.
Just because I disagree with your positions, doesn't mean that I do not respect or acknowledge your views, or the source of them. Indeed, my GP would love you, and you seem to come from a informed traditional medical or science educated background. Your responses have been consistently intelligently presented and, in comparison to many of the debates on HUKD, this has been a delight.
I used to share your belief system, but though widely shared and promoted in all our media, it is truly deeply outdated. Lipo-phobia is the default position in the UK. Look around you. Is the low-fat, high (complex) carb advice working for obesity, heart disease, diabetes, or is the population getting generally fatter and unhealthier?
We may never agree, and a paradigm shift this severe can prove difficult - "Pfft, fat causes fat, it's obvious. This guy's a nutter!". In my defence, I have done extensive research and "walk the walk" through my own consumption. Don't let the BMA, BBC, Kelloggs, Coco-Cola, grain producers, etc. fool you. Follow the money - who is funding the studies that you may rely on. The internet can be a powerful resource, as well as many published works in the bookshops, and if you choose to, you will find many better qualified than I who can point out the scientific facts behind my assertions.
Or not. Blue pill, red pill. You decide. Next week, carbs in, carbs out - best joke ever? All the best.[/quote]

You are fixated on free radicals. Free radicals, as damaging as they are, exist in fat in minute quantities. Furthermore, their ability to inflict cellular damage as free radicals is not that great compared to say, a dioxygen radical, which is very damaging to cells and DNA. The trouble with ghee is, as you say, that the fat molecules (sat fats and cholesterol) are stable. It cannot be metabolised so it cannot be cleared from the body. It starts to stack up to form atherosclerotic plaques. This is far far more damaging than anything tiny amounts of free radicals in healthy oil could do. The perfect fat molecule is one that, if it becomes a radical, it is a stable radical. But, it needs to have sufficient reactivity to be metabolised- so it does not accumulate in the body. Polyunsaturates and Cis-fatty acids in olive, rapeseed, sunflower oil meet this criteria perfectly. Those found in ghee do not. As for coconut oil- yes this is a healthy oil as well. I was just saying that has a high content of palmitic acid which is a saturated fat., which is very calorific. But, again when comparing coconut oil to the dreadful ghee- coconut oil wins hands down. I agree there is a lot of misinformation around and a lot of private agendas around. But, the advice I would give you is simple. Stay the hell away from ghee!!![/quote]

you people need to get out more

you people need to get out more



Pretty rude... Heat added!

Cheapest price ever, even cheaper than Costco. Voted HOT
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