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Large DIY woven PE cloth potato growing planter for £5.57 delivered from Poland @ AliExpress Deals / Shenzhen SuperDeal Technology
171° Expired

Large DIY woven PE cloth potato growing planter for £5.57 delivered from Poland @ AliExpress Deals / Shenzhen SuperDeal Technology

Deal editor16
Deal editor
Posted 14th AprShipping from Poland

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Grow your own spuds in this large planter bag, shipped from Poland but made in China. Ideal for growing root vegetables in smaller gardens or in greenhouses. Everyone has found their green fingers over the last few weeks, so why not try something a bit more challenging than just trimming the lawn?

Features
  • 100% brand new and high quality..
  • The product is made by woven fabric, the quality of which is excellent.
  • The product is excellent for Planting potatoes, vegetables etc.
  • Water regularly and harvest as soon as 7 weeks.
  • The price is competitive.

Specifications
  • Colour: Black green
  • Size: 45*35cm
  • Material: Woven PE fabric

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16 Comments
Any one the best place to buy seed potatoes?
Argyll6814/04/2020 14:24

Any one the best place to buy seed potatoes?


You can get in B&M ALDI etc
Argyll6814/04/2020 14:24

Any one the best place to buy seed potatoes?


Poundland is where I got mine.
Genuine question can’t I just throw a shop bought potato in? I did this once as a student and had a garden full of potatoes
Monaco.Blue14/04/2020 15:34

Genuine question can’t I just throw a shop bought potato in? I did this o …Genuine question can’t I just throw a shop bought potato in? I did this once as a student and had a garden full of potatoes


"While you could plant any potatoes and have them grow into plants, it is not recommended that you try growing potatoes from the grocery store for two reasons. First, grocery produce is often treated with a growth inhibitor. This is meant to keep the produce fresh longer, by preventing it from sprouting. Even when planted in the garden, your grocery potatoes may never take root.

Organically grown potatoes are probably free of growth inhibitors, but they still don't make the best choices for seed potatoes. Because potatoes are propagated vegetatively, any diseases from the prior year will be carried over in those small pieces of potato. That's why it is so important to use disease-free seed potatoes. That means buying certified seed potatoes, rather than supermarket potatoes. Certified seed potatoes are certified by a government authority to be disease-free."

This is from The Spruce.
Monaco.Blue14/04/2020 15:34

Genuine question can’t I just throw a shop bought potato in? I did this o …Genuine question can’t I just throw a shop bought potato in? I did this once as a student and had a garden full of potatoes


I have grown jersey royal potatoes from Sainsbury’s. And Albert Bartlet potatoes from Sainsbury’s too. I have noticed where I planted them last year there’s small potatoes starting to grow again I think I must have not got all of them out. But to answer your question yes you can.
Can anyone recommend anything else that is easy to grow in these apart from potatoes?
Every bag of supermarket potatoes I have ever bought and stored in a cool dark cupboard starts sprouting after a week or so. There are many things my mum grows on her concrete covered back yard in planters and grow bags, beans, radishes , lettuce to name a few.
or you could just plant them in the ground for free? Looks like a solution looking for a problem.
mcrobbj14/04/2020 19:16

or you could just plant them in the ground for free? Looks like a solution …or you could just plant them in the ground for free? Looks like a solution looking for a problem.


Potatoes take over. Seriously the garden was taken over by them
thought this was a DIY Lord Buckethead mask for a minute.

Could be handy for doing the shopping down at your local supermarket in the current climate.40413504-JIPi3.jpg
I have used rubble sacks with a drain hole punched in. When it's time to harvest, I stick my arm in and pick out the large ones leaving the small spuds to grow for next week.
pa55word12314/04/2020 20:58

I have used rubble sacks with a drain hole punched in. When it's time to …I have used rubble sacks with a drain hole punched in. When it's time to harvest, I stick my arm in and pick out the large ones leaving the small spuds to grow for next week.


Yeah that's what we do, use old garden manure sacks or similar... fill 1/3rd with soil and compost, poke holes in the bottom, plant old spuds that came from supermarket but sprouted legs. Works well and no need to buy anything.
justonemore14/04/2020 18:23

Can anyone recommend anything else that is easy to grow in these apart …Can anyone recommend anything else that is easy to grow in these apart from potatoes?


Beetroot, leeks, carrots, sweet corn, peas, runner beans, cucumber, aubergine, okra, spinach, onions, tomatoes, you will
Need to support tomatoes, cucumbers etc. But they all grow. Am currently growing them.
SajidAli-ad629.0611314/04/2020 23:44

Beetroot, leeks, carrots, sweet corn, peas, runner beans, cucumber, …Beetroot, leeks, carrots, sweet corn, peas, runner beans, cucumber, aubergine, okra, spinach, onions, tomatoes, you willNeed to support tomatoes, cucumbers etc. But they all grow. Am currently growing them.


Is there any from that list you’d advise for a beginner like me in the garden? Thinking what will be more robust
justonemore14/04/2020 23:50

Is there any from that list you’d advise for a beginner like me in the g …Is there any from that list you’d advise for a beginner like me in the garden? Thinking what will be more robust


To tell you the truth I looked at YouTube videos to see what can be grown in a colder country like uk. And the seeds I used are all hybrid types too. And I just used normal multipurpose compost and mixed with slow release multipurpose plant food. I grow the seeds inside my home in either a recycled egg box or empty yoghurt pots once the seedlings are a couple of inches tall put them outside for full days for a week then plant them outside. That’s what’s working for me. And I definitely ain’t no Alan ticthmarsh .
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