Large Olive Tree £20 or 2 for £30 at Morrisons Instore
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Large Olive Tree £20 or 2 for £30 at Morrisons Instore

50
Found 10th Mar 2015
This is a very good price for an olive tree. They are £20 each or two for £30. I bought two and they were all the same height - the two I have are 160cm high (just over 5ft) and 120cm to the first branch.

They come with a fancy ornate baby pink bow so I'm guessing they're for mother's day.

You'd pay normally double or more for an olive tree this size so a good deal, and even better at £15 each if you buy two.

I couldn't find the deal online so the image is from the net and is the closest I could find to what they look like.

50 Comments

Any description on what variety of olive?

How long til they produce ?

Awesome didnt think we could grow olives here!

Original Poster

LesD

Any description on what variety of olive?




The label says;

"Olive Olea Europaea

'The Tree of Peace' Mediterranean plant. It has a rounded head of narrow greyish green leaves, with contrasting silver undersides. Small creamy white scented flowers appear in summer and may be followed by small oval green fruits.

Prefers well drained soil in full sun. They perform very well in pots."

It says some other stuff about care and that it is "hardy".





Saw these today in my local. Absolute bargain for the price. Id expect landscape gardeners to buy them all up at this price.

Quick google search and sounds like they will need protection during the winter months, Great if you have a conservatory or greenhouse, but otherwise there likely to die if left outside

Phila4

The label says;"Olive Olea Europaea'The Tree of Peace' Mediterranean … The label says;"Olive Olea Europaea'The Tree of Peace' Mediterranean plant. It has a rounded head of narrow greyish green leaves, with contrasting silver undersides. Small creamy white scented flowers appear in summer and may be followed by small oval green fruits.Prefers well drained soil in full sun. They perform very well in pots."It says some other stuff about care and that it is "hardy".



Thanks Phil. Here's the RHS blurb. Seems that's the generic name.

rhs.org.uk/adv…138

Here's a list of varieties if anyone can suss which they are....

Olea europaea ‘Arbequina’
Origin: Catalonia, Spain

Olea europaea ‘Arbequina’ is a small tree of medium vigour with a weeping habit. It produces which can be prepared for eating or used to make excellent olive oil. This is an adaptable tree tolerant of frost and poor soils; probably self-fertile.

Olea europaea ‘Cipressino’
Origin: Puglia, Italy

Olea europaea ‘Cipressino’ is a vigorous upright tree, getting its name from its similarity to the habit of the pencil-like Italian cypress. It is a very hardy tree and shows good resistance to coastal conditions but will require a pollinator to produce an abundance of black olives that are best suited for fine olive oil.

Olea europaea ‘Frantoio’
Origin: Tuscany, Italy

Olea europaea ‘Frantoio’ is one of our favourite varieties; it makes the classic small to medium sized olive tree that is indicative of the olive groves around the foothills of Tuscany. It is a self-fertile tree, as well as being a good pollinator; the olives make a lovely, fruity aromatic oil.

Olea europaea ‘Hojiblanca’
Origin: Andalucia, Spain

Olea europaea ‘Hojiblanca’ produces long arching branches covered in leaves that have distinct white undersides, making the trees instantly recognisable when seen en masse. It is tolerant of the cold and produces long oval-shaped fruit that can be used for both table and oil.

Olea europaea ‘Leccino’
Origin: Tuscany, Italy

Olea europaea ‘Leccino’ with its open semi-pendulous habit is a popular and widely planted form - it is easy to cultivate and is tolerant of a wide range of conditions. Leccino produces olives that are of high quality and are suitable for both the table and olive oil production. This is a self-sterile form and so should be planted with a good pollinator.

Olea europaea ‘Manzanilla’
Origin: Andalucia, Spain

Olea europaea ‘Manzanilla’ is a small to medium upright tree with arching fruiting branches. It produces the classic small green olive often sold salted in Spanish markets. It is hardy but requires a companion pollinator.

Olea europaea ‘Maurino’
Origin: Tuscany, Italy

Olea europaea ‘Maurino’ is another typical Tuscan variety often planted with Frantoio and Leccino; it is not a huge cropper but is important as a cross pollinator to the other high-yielding varieties. It is hardy and tolerant of a wide range of conditions.

Olea europaea ‘Pendolino’
Origin: Tuscany, Italy

This is a small compact weeping form that is useful where space is limited; it has long thin leaves which add to its architectural appeal. Although a good pollinator itself, Pendolino is a self-sterile cultivar and needs to be near other pollinators to produce its multi-purpose black olives.

Olea europaea ‘Picual’
Origin: Andalucia, Spain

Olea europaea is a vigorous, fairly large growing olive that is often seen as a heavily pruned, mature specimen. It is hardy and has an amazing ability to regenerate from old wood. Picual is self fertile and a producer of rich, dark olive oil.
Edited by: "LesD" 10th Mar 2015

scbu2

Quick google search and sounds like they will need protection during the … Quick google search and sounds like they will need protection during the winter months, Great if you have a conservatory or greenhouse, but otherwise there likely to die if left outside


Mine have been outside for 8 winters so far, I fleece them and they are thriving.

Just a heads up unless we have an exceptional summer these are unlikely to yield any Edible olives. But brilliant price for the size!

totally pointless, get a bayleaf tree instead, looks just as good but at least can be used for cooking!

Original Poster

wipeout1319

Just a heads up unless we have an exceptional summer these are unlikely … Just a heads up unless we have an exceptional summer these are unlikely to yield any Edible olives. But brilliant price for the size!





Well I for one would be very happy if it didn't produce olives. I tried one, once, in a restaurant and NEVER AGAIN!! Why anybody would voluntarily eat olives is beyond my comprehension, although I know I'm probably in the minority.

However (and I don't get many opportunities to quote Ghandi on here), even in a minority of one, the truth is still the truth.

Original Poster

wipeout1319

Just a heads up unless we have an exceptional summer these are unlikely … Just a heads up unless we have an exceptional summer these are unlikely to yield any Edible olives. But brilliant price for the size!




Funnily enough, this morning I happened to be in a local garden centre looking at palm trees and noticed they had olive, bay and box(?) trees in this style and the olive ones were smaller than this but were £50 to £75 depending on the variety. I didn't pay a lot of attention because I wasn't looking for one but it was just chance that I popped into Morrison's this afternoon and saw these.

Original Poster

LesD

Thanks Phil. Here's the RHS blurb. Seems that's the generic … Thanks Phil. Here's the RHS blurb. Seems that's the generic name.https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=138





I've just had another look at the label and pot but no other information is shown. It does though state it grows to 2-2.5m. So it's already around 70% of its max height!

An unusual item to post but I vote hot for the price. Not sure if it would bare much fruit but well worth the price without fruit.

Shame to waste all those nice Mediterranean trees (and money) knowing that they will most likely die in the UK.

I had an olive tree in my garden for many years. It needs protection in the winter with fleece, and also some foam around the base. It won't grow any olives unless we have a long hot summer. Mine did flower some years, and very small fruit started to grow but then it turned cold and they stopped growing. So they can survive in Britain, but unlikely to grow olives unless it gets hot.

The cold in the UK will kill them. Save your money.

(Even the Roman soldiers were not daft enough to try growing them here.)

eaglewolf

I had an olive tree in my garden for many years. It needs protection in … I had an olive tree in my garden for many years. It needs protection in the winter with fleece, and also some foam around the base. It won't grow any olives unless we have a long hot summer. Mine did flower some years, and very small fruit started to grow but then it turned cold and they stopped growing. So they can survive in Britain, but unlikely to grow olives unless it gets hot.


Where (if you don"t mind me asking) do you live?

We got an olive tree from morrisons 5years ago (for about £20), it does NOT grow olives (not hot enough here and too wet, does flower) but it has grown well and only been brought inside one winter when there was loads of snow, other years it survived fine

Edited by: "harveyhanson" 10th Mar 2015

eatmorefish

Where (if you don"t mind me asking) do you live?



Sunny tropical Birmingham!

Phila4

Well I for one would be very happy if it didn't produce olives. I tried … Well I for one would be very happy if it didn't produce olives. I tried one, once, in a restaurant and NEVER AGAIN!! Why anybody would voluntarily eat olives is beyond my comprehension, although I know I'm probably in the minority.


Couldn't agree more, vile things that taste foul.

I forgot to say these trees get big! Ours reached about 8 foot tall after 10 years. The large ones are also very valuable. Once saw a full size tree selling in a garden centre for £3000. Not sure how that would fit in the car boot!

Only ever had tiny little black olives in my south facing garden, not really worth it, my standard bay trees are brilliant though and handy for cooking, got them reduced from B&Q

I bought 4 of these last year, they were reduced to £5 each at the end of the season. I've changed the pots and they've been living out side all winter and they're fine. I have one tree that been outside for the last 4 years and it grows olives every year, I shake the snow off of it and that's it.

Original Poster

eatmorefish

The cold in the UK will kill them. Save your money.(Even the Roman … The cold in the UK will kill them. Save your money.(Even the Roman soldiers were not daft enough to try growing them here.)





Utter tosh!


Taken from http://www.bigplantnursery.co.uk/GrowingGuideOlives.htm

Introduction

The olive tree, Olea europaea is instantly recognisable as the quintessential Mediterranean tree and stands as the archetypal sentinel of warm, sunny climes. It is then perhaps surprising that the olive tree is an adaptable and hardy plant suitable for growing in a wide range of climates. In the UK, olive trees perform well in the milder microclimates which to generalise, are southern and western regions, coastal areas and urban locations.


Growing olive trees

To ensure you give your olive tree the best possible start to life, just follow these criteria:

1.Site in the sunniest position possible, ideally south or west facing with some protection from the north and east winds
2.Plant in free-draining soil that will not become waterlogged during the wetter parts of the year; olives are tolerant of both acidic and alkaline soils. Poor sandy soils will benefit from the addition of organic compost and clay soils may require additional drainage or if this is not feasible, then consider a raised bed.
3.Olive trees can successfully grow in containers for many years and while they will grow in most composts, for long-term cultivation we recommend mixing a good quality multipurpose compost 50/50 with John Innes No.3. Never over-pot your olive tree and always re-pot just to a slightly larger pot.
4.Olive trees can be easily pruned to maintain the size and habit required. We recommend that light, formative pruning is undertaken in mid-spring with heavier trimming in early to mid-summer. Never prune during the winter and be cautious in the autumn: like many Mediterranean trees, olives need some heat and recovery time to heal wounds before the dormant winter period.
5.Feed your olive tree with seaweed extract fortnightly between May and September to ensure the tree stays healthy, vigorous and happy.

Cold weather

In areas where the minimum winter temperatures are between -2°C and -5°C, olive trees require no winter protection and will even tolerate drops down to -7°C for short periods, providing the daytime temperature rises sufficiently. In areas of lower winter temperatures, your olive tree can be protected with several layers of horticultural fleece wrapped around the trunk and crown of the tree.
Like many plants grown in pots, olive trees have not yet evolved to tolerate frozen roots; if this happens, they can suffer drought through not being able to take up water or worse still, the roots will be damaged which can result in subsequent poor growth or even death of the tree.
But fear not! This can be prevented by adding several layers of bubble plastic to the inside of the pot when re-potting the plant or simply add layers of bubble plastic to the outside of the pot and secure with twine (not quite as attractive, but just as effective).

Olive tree fruit production

Now the exciting bit – can I produce olives outside in the UK and are they edible? Yes and yes, provided you have the ‘correct’ olive cultivar and you prepare your olives in the manner shown in our olive recipe. At Big Plant Nursery we have been growing and researching olive tree varieties for many years and have selected a range most suitable for UK gardening.


square72

Mine have been outside for 8 winters so far, I fleece them and they are … Mine have been outside for 8 winters so far, I fleece them and they are thriving.


Fleece them? Like um.. put a coat on them?? (Gardening Noob)

Original Poster

boothinnit

Fleece them? Like um.. put a coat on them?? (Gardening Noob)




Kind of. You put horticultural fleece around them - you can actually buy fleece bags to slip over them. I bought some late last year at about £5 for 3 large fleece bags to cover some palm trees. You could also use hessian but that may be a little too heavy. Basically the fleece acts as a barrier between the plant and the cold, frosty weather.

I saw them today in store and they would look great either side of the front door , however i dont fancy having them covered in fleece in winter so they will probably die lol

Original Poster

scbu2

I saw them today in store and they would look great either side of the … I saw them today in store and they would look great either side of the front door , however i dont fancy having them covered in fleece in winter so they will probably die lol



Just stick a fleece bag over the top, a bit of bubble wrap around the pot and you're done. If you think they'll look unsightly just stick them round the back out of site in a sheltered position. Just give them a LITTLE water once a month or so through winter. Or just pop them in your conservatory as is if you have one.

Phila4

Utter tosh! Taken from … Utter tosh! Taken from http://www.bigplantnursery.co.uk/GrowingGuideOlives.htmIntroductionThe olive tree, Olea europaea is instantly recognisable as the quintessential Mediterranean tree and stands as the archetypal sentinel of warm, sunny climes. It is then perhaps surprising that the olive tree is an adaptable and hardy plant suitable for growing in a wide range of climates. In the UK, olive trees perform well in the milder microclimates which to generalise, are southern and western regions, coastal areas and urban locations.Growing olive treesTo ensure you give your olive tree the best possible start to life, just follow these criteria:1.Site in the sunniest position possible, ideally south or west facing with some protection from the north and east winds2.Plant in free-draining soil that will not become waterlogged during the wetter parts of the year; olives are tolerant of both acidic and alkaline soils. Poor sandy soils will benefit from the addition of organic compost and clay soils may require additional drainage or if this is not feasible, then consider a raised bed.3.Olive trees can successfully grow in containers for many years and while they will grow in most composts, for long-term cultivation we recommend mixing a good quality multipurpose compost 50/50 with John Innes No.3. Never over-pot your olive tree and always re-pot just to a slightly larger pot.4.Olive trees can be easily pruned to maintain the size and habit required. We recommend that light, formative pruning is undertaken in mid-spring with heavier trimming in early to mid-summer. Never prune during the winter and be cautious in the autumn: like many Mediterranean trees, olives need some heat and recovery time to heal wounds before the dormant winter period.5.Feed your olive tree with seaweed extract fortnightly between May and September to ensure the tree stays healthy, vigorous and happy.Cold weatherIn areas where the minimum winter temperatures are between -2°C and -5°C, olive trees require no winter protection and will even tolerate drops down to -7°C for short periods, providing the daytime temperature rises sufficiently. In areas of lower winter temperatures, your olive tree can be protected with several layers of horticultural fleece wrapped around the trunk and crown of the tree. Like many plants grown in pots, olive trees have not yet evolved to tolerate frozen roots; if this happens, they can suffer drought through not being able to take up water or worse still, the roots will be damaged which can result in subsequent poor growth or even death of the tree. But fear not! This can be prevented by adding several layers of bubble plastic to the inside of the pot when re-potting the plant or simply add layers of bubble plastic to the outside of the pot and secure with twine (not quite as attractive, but just as effective).Olive tree fruit productionNow the exciting bit – can I produce olives outside in the UK and are they edible? Yes and yes, provided you have the ‘correct’ olive cultivar and you prepare your olives in the manner shown in our olive recipe. At Big Plant Nursery we have been growing and researching olive tree varieties for many years and have selected a range most suitable for UK gardening.


Ha! Thanks for the cut and paste. One of the wonderful things about the internet is that you never know who you might be talking to. Tomorrow I shall be giving a wine tour in Tuscany where I shall be showing the damage that cold does to olive trees. If you like I can send you some awesome pics including a copy of tomorrow's La Republic!
You may nurse one of these olive trees through a few winters but it won't thrive and will end in disappointment.

Even if you do harvest olives, you can't eat them straight off the tree, you will need to prepare them, IIRC this involves brining for couple of months.

I have had two olive trees for about four years I keep mine in pots on my patio they do flower and I get very small olives on them every year but not big enough to eat they are really only for decoration. But well worth £20-£30.

Banned

Comment

toastie

Shame to waste all those nice Mediterranean trees (and money) knowing … Shame to waste all those nice Mediterranean trees (and money) knowing that they will most likely die in the UK.



Yes toastie you're right!

We don't have the climate for these, I'd rather send them back to the countries it would grow and benefit the people over there preferably the poor.

Phila4

Utter tosh! Taken from … Utter tosh! Taken from http://www.bigplantnursery.co.uk/GrowingGuideOlives.htmIntroductionThe olive tree, Olea europaea is instantly recognisable as the quintessential Mediterranean tree and stands as the archetypal sentinel of warm, sunny climes. It is then perhaps surprising that the olive tree is an adaptable and hardy plant suitable for growing in a wide range of climates. In the UK, olive trees perform well in the milder microclimates which to generalise, are southern and western regions, coastal areas and urban locations.Growing olive treesTo ensure you give your olive tree the best possible start to life, just follow these criteria:1.Site in the sunniest position possible, ideally south or west facing with some protection from the north and east winds2.Plant in free-draining soil that will not become waterlogged during the wetter parts of the year; olives are tolerant of both acidic and alkaline soils. Poor sandy soils will benefit from the addition of organic compost and clay soils may require additional drainage or if this is not feasible, then consider a raised bed.3.Olive trees can successfully grow in containers for many years and while they will grow in most composts, for long-term cultivation we recommend mixing a good quality multipurpose compost 50/50 with John Innes No.3. Never over-pot your olive tree and always re-pot just to a slightly larger pot.4.Olive trees can be easily pruned to maintain the size and habit required. We recommend that light, formative pruning is undertaken in mid-spring with heavier trimming in early to mid-summer. Never prune during the winter and be cautious in the autumn: like many Mediterranean trees, olives need some heat and recovery time to heal wounds before the dormant winter period.5.Feed your olive tree with seaweed extract fortnightly between May and September to ensure the tree stays healthy, vigorous and happy.Cold weatherIn areas where the minimum winter temperatures are between -2°C and -5°C, olive trees require no winter protection and will even tolerate drops down to -7°C for short periods, providing the daytime temperature rises sufficiently. In areas of lower winter temperatures, your olive tree can be protected with several layers of horticultural fleece wrapped around the trunk and crown of the tree. Like many plants grown in pots, olive trees have not yet evolved to tolerate frozen roots; if this happens, they can suffer drought through not being able to take up water or worse still, the roots will be damaged which can result in subsequent poor growth or even death of the tree. But fear not! This can be prevented by adding several layers of bubble plastic to the inside of the pot when re-potting the plant or simply add layers of bubble plastic to the outside of the pot and secure with twine (not quite as attractive, but just as effective).Olive tree fruit productionNow the exciting bit – can I produce olives outside in the UK and are they edible? Yes and yes, provided you have the ‘correct’ olive cultivar and you prepare your olives in the manner shown in our olive recipe. At Big Plant Nursery we have been growing and researching olive tree varieties for many years and have selected a range most suitable for UK gardening.



what size litre pot did they come in ?
was there a barcode so i can ring my local branch ?

Original Poster

eatmorefish

Ha! Thanks for the cut and paste. One of the wonderful things about the … Ha! Thanks for the cut and paste. One of the wonderful things about the internet is that you never know who you might be talking to. Tomorrow I shall be giving a wine tour in Tuscany where I shall be showing the damage that cold does to olive trees. If you like I can send you some awesome pics including a copy of tomorrow's La Republic!You may nurse one of these olive trees through a few winters but it won't thrive and will end in disappointment.




Hmm, now who do I trust more - a company that for 15 years has specialised in importing, nurturing and growing "hardy exotic plants including hardy exotic and architectural trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants", all the people that have successfully kept these through winter (with and without frost protection), some of whom did have fruit, myself who keeps exotic palms and similar specialised trees - or some guy who happens to be going on a p*ss up in France tomorrow?

Do you point at airplanes in the sky and shout out in your best pirate-like voice; "Ha-ha, it be a flying coffin - ye all be doomed up there, DOOMED I TELL YA!! D-O-O-M-E-D ! ! HA-HA-Ha-Ha...............................................".

Seriously, it's a £20 Olive tree dude - a half or third the normal price elsewhere. All I can say now is........................................





http://rlv.zcache.co.uk/keep_calm_and_drink_wine_poster-ra7be514dbd734d04929242311ed944cc_ix6_8byvr_324.jpg

Original Poster

shez786

what size litre pot did they come in ?was there a barcode so i can ring … what size litre pot did they come in ?was there a barcode so i can ring my local branch ?




Well they're outside and it's dark now so can't check, but just call them - I'm sure they'll know whether they have a 5ft high tree in their store.

Pot size - I'd say 7 to 10L. It's about 10-12 inches in depth and around 10-12 inches in diameter.

Phila4

Well I for one would be very happy if it didn't produce olives. I tried … Well I for one would be very happy if it didn't produce olives. I tried one, once, in a restaurant and NEVER AGAIN!! Why anybody would voluntarily eat olives is beyond my comprehension, although I know I'm probably in the minority.However (and I don't get many opportunities to quote Ghandi on here), even in a minority of one, the truth is still the truth.



I used to think the same. Olives used to taste absolutely horrendous to me. However I now like the green ones. Just getting used to the black ones now. I'm amazed at how much my taste has changed by persevering, I no longer balk at the thought of eating one. If you want to try them then I suggest getting some ones infused with lemon, then maybe some stuffed pimiento ones.
Edited by: "fishmaster" 10th Mar 2015

Phila4

Well I for one would be very happy if it didn't produce olives. I tried … Well I for one would be very happy if it didn't produce olives. I tried one, once, in a restaurant and NEVER AGAIN!! Why anybody would voluntarily eat olives is beyond my comprehension, although I know I'm probably in the minority.However (and I don't get many opportunities to quote Ghandi on here), even in a minority of one, the truth is still the truth.



One single olive and never again? Some people on this website are hilarious!!

I bought two of these yesterday , great deal . I have another larger olive tree in my courtyard garden that I've had for nearly 8 years , it has started to grow olives the past few years , I never cover it in winter and just give it a clip back in late spring to encourage growth and sporadic plant food when I remember !


Comment

eatmorefish

Where (if you don"t mind me asking) do you live?

Bargain, and beautiful!
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