Learn to Code with Ruby (Udemy)
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Learn to Code with Ruby (Udemy)

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Found 24th Sep 2018
A comprehensive introduction to coding with the Ruby programming language. Complete beginners welcome!
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FunkiestMonkey1 h, 2 m ago

Pah. When you can program in IBM mainframe Assembler then call me.P.s. hot …Pah. When you can program in IBM mainframe Assembler then call me.P.s. hot deal.


Why would we call you
Edited by: "praevalens" 25th Sep 2018
31 Comments
Thank you for posting
Heat added
Thanks, great!
Great find Op thanks
Thanks OP.
Nice find
Pah. When you can program in IBM mainframe Assembler then call me.
P.s. hot deal.
Edited by: "FunkiestMonkey" 25th Sep 2018
FunkiestMonkey1 h, 2 m ago

Pah. When you can program in IBM mainframe Assembler then call me.P.s. hot …Pah. When you can program in IBM mainframe Assembler then call me.P.s. hot deal.


Why would we call you
Edited by: "praevalens" 25th Sep 2018
Thanks op, always wanted to try learning to code.
Ruby or Python??
VashTech18 m ago

Ruby or Python??


Python, easily, zero questions asked. Massively more popular and way more useful. Although as always it may depend on what you are going to use the language for
praevalens1 h, 15 m ago

Why would we call you


Forget that, i should have your avatar as mine.
Shard8 m ago

Python, easily, zero questions asked. Massively more popular and way more …Python, easily, zero questions asked. Massively more popular and way more useful. Although as always it may depend on what you are going to use the language for


I've admittedly never spent an extended period of time playing with Python (it's on the list), and I'm somewhat biased what with being a Ruby developer. But, as a language it has a lot going for it. It's not as popular, but that doesn't mean it's not more pleasant to use. If you're doing it for employability, you'll find Python jobs come up more frequently. If it's for fun, I wouldn't discount it too soon.
Shard2 h, 35 m ago

Do people still use Ruby? It seems …Do people still use Ruby? It seems yeshttps://insights.stackoverflow.com/survey/2018/


Yea I still use it for CHEF
Edited by: "neddyuk" 25th Sep 2018
smithmr81 h, 2 m ago

I've admittedly never spent an extended period of time playing with Python …I've admittedly never spent an extended period of time playing with Python (it's on the list), and I'm somewhat biased what with being a Ruby developer. But, as a language it has a lot going for it. It's not as popular, but that doesn't mean it's not more pleasant to use. If you're doing it for employability, you'll find Python jobs come up more frequently. If it's for fun, I wouldn't discount it too soon.


I've never used Python either, I used to use Perl, these days it's Powershell

I assumed they were asking because they wanted a first programming language, and normally you would go for the more popular ones. With the Cloud getting more prevalent I'd pick a first language that is easier to use with the Cloud, for Azure that would be Python (although neddyuk mentioned using Ruby with Chef, so who knows). I don't know much about AWS.

I know that SASS has moved away from Ruby.

However, once you've been programming for a while it becomes academic as you'll normally know lots of languages. On a day to day basis I use C#, .NET, Javascript, Typescript, Less, SQL (2 variations) (probably others) and in the past I've used loads of others
Edited by: "Shard" 25th Sep 2018
Shard18 m ago

I've never used Python either, I used to use Perl, these days it's …I've never used Python either, I used to use Perl, these days it's PowershellI assumed they were asking because they wanted a first programming language, and normally you would go for the more popular ones. With the Cloud getting more prevalent I'd pick a first language that is easier to use with the Cloud, for Azure that would be Python (although neddyuk mentioned using Ruby with Chef, so who knows). I don't know much about AWS. I know that SASS has moved away from Ruby.However, once you've been programming for a while it becomes academic as you'll normally know lots of languages. On a day to day basis I use C#, .NET, Javascript, Typescript, Less, SQL (2 variations) (probably others) and in the past I've used loads of others



Puppet would also have an affinity with Ruby
Ansible though would be the other way

All dependent on use case

P.S. ta OP - good post for those wanting for free
Edited by: "Bertz99" 25th Sep 2018
Excellent, thanks!
The chap says 'aaaaaright' at the start of every lesson. Must be his catchphrase...
Heat added. Good freebie and good name for the freebie!
35356419-FNLND.jpg

Shard12 h, 12 m ago

Do people still use Ruby? It seems …Do people still use Ruby? It seems yeshttps://insights.stackoverflow.com/survey/2018/


Cheers for the link, really insightful!
Learn C
???
Profit
The course content looks pretty exhaustive for the language itself. A very good grounding if the teaching is decent. Seems to be very little about the Ruby standard library, Rails or other important parts of the eco-system (e,g, package management, testing), so, very much a first step if you want to get to a hobbyist web developer level.

Couple of tips:

Just install Ruby 2.5.1 (or whatever is the most recent version when you read this post). Ruby 2.3.3 mentioned in the course was probably the latest at the time but the updated version shouldn't cause problems when following the course. You should be on the latest, most secure version.

Don't get perturbed about remembering later parts of the course and concentrate on the principles. Nobody, bar freakish geniuses, will remember regex syntax or the multitude of methods on Array first time. Don't worry if subjects likes "singleton classes" aren't understood straight away either a lot of professionals don't fully grok this stuff without continually looking up documentation, going to Stack Exchange or trying google searches.

PS. on Ruby versus Python.. I'm not a Python guy. Ruby clicked with me but there's no doubt for machine learning, math, maker tinkering and many other activities Python is better supported. Ruby wins when it comes to web development and testing but Python is a closer second here than Ruby is for most other activities.
reuyj1 h, 44 m ago

Learn C???Profit


Don't think its that easy mate
Shard11 h, 54 m ago

I've never used Python either, I used to use Perl, these days it's …I've never used Python either, I used to use Perl, these days it's PowershellI assumed they were asking because they wanted a first programming language, and normally you would go for the more popular ones. With the Cloud getting more prevalent I'd pick a first language that is easier to use with the Cloud, for Azure that would be Python (although neddyuk mentioned using Ruby with Chef, so who knows). I don't know much about AWS. I know that SASS has moved away from Ruby.However, once you've been programming for a while it becomes academic as you'll normally know lots of languages. On a day to day basis I use C#, .NET, Javascript, Typescript, Less, SQL (2 variations) (probably others) and in the past I've used loads of others


I found your comment fairly bizzarre and maybe it's just me being silly...

But the language you choose to program has got absolutely nothing to do with the cloud with a capital c.

The sentence "easier to use with the Cloud, for Azure that would be Python" has got to be the most odd comment I've read in years.

On the one hand I want to understand what you're saying and agree - Ubuntu uses a lot of Python in its core packages.. but then on the other hand all of the cloud isore or less agnostic.

Python and Ruby are quite similar (now please don't shoot or me or accuse me of being a hypocrite now as I say odd stuff) when compared to other languages such as C. As a start to programming Ruby has got to be a great idea for anyone. But as a Ruby developer myself I'm now going to start using Python more and more as the internet is all about going with the trends.

The other person who commented learn C and profit is probably actually right. While that's also an odd comment.

Anyway I just wanted to ask you why you said that as to someone with no experience who may read your comment they'd think that somehow "Python is better for the Cloud" and waste time trying to investigate that comment when it's completely meaningless and then they might be put off.

99/100 people taking a look at Ruby will then use Ruby on Rails to build a web app or a restful API to back end an app. They'd be smart to do so, it is quick, efficient, big community and lots of packages (called gems) make it highly extensible. It's fast (yes it is, don't worry, people will say it isn't but it actually is) and it's less likely to be slowed down by bad programming than other languages - if your app is slowed down by it then you've probably got some users and therefore well done, you have probably also learned to code and can fix those issues.

What's best for the cloud is what's best for you. The cloud is the same as everything else, it's just a computer in a box in a data centre with a virtual machine dictating how much cpu power, bandwidth, storage and memory you have. Exactly the same as servers have been for the last ten years but as part of a larger computer which allows you to have a "virtual" private instance rather than a full slice (thin server computer) as it was up to around 2005.

If you are like "phooaaawww this all a bit much guys I'm just looking to get into code" brilliant go for it if you're like "well I don't fully agree with what he is saying" then cool join the debate just don't put other people off with confusing sentences about systems which are largely agnostic.
Cheers!
Signed up,.thanks OP will be interesting
Schwifty10 h, 21 m ago

I found your comment fairly bizzarre and maybe it's just me being …I found your comment fairly bizzarre and maybe it's just me being silly...But the language you choose to program has got absolutely nothing to do with the cloud with a capital c.The sentence "easier to use with the Cloud, for Azure that would be Python" has got to be the most odd comment I've read in years. On the one hand I want to understand what you're saying and agree - Ubuntu uses a lot of Python in its core packages.. but then on the other hand all of the cloud isore or less agnostic.Python and Ruby are quite similar (now please don't shoot or me or accuse me of being a hypocrite now as I say odd stuff) when compared to other languages such as C. As a start to programming Ruby has got to be a great idea for anyone. But as a Ruby developer myself I'm now going to start using Python more and more as the internet is all about going with the trends. The other person who commented learn C and profit is probably actually right. While that's also an odd comment. Anyway I just wanted to ask you why you said that as to someone with no experience who may read your comment they'd think that somehow "Python is better for the Cloud" and waste time trying to investigate that comment when it's completely meaningless and then they might be put off. 99/100 people taking a look at Ruby will then use Ruby on Rails to build a web app or a restful API to back end an app. They'd be smart to do so, it is quick, efficient, big community and lots of packages (called gems) make it highly extensible. It's fast (yes it is, don't worry, people will say it isn't but it actually is) and it's less likely to be slowed down by bad programming than other languages - if your app is slowed down by it then you've probably got some users and therefore well done, you have probably also learned to code and can fix those issues. What's best for the cloud is what's best for you. The cloud is the same as everything else, it's just a computer in a box in a data centre with a virtual machine dictating how much cpu power, bandwidth, storage and memory you have. Exactly the same as servers have been for the last ten years but as part of a larger computer which allows you to have a "virtual" private instance rather than a full slice (thin server computer) as it was up to around 2005. If you are like "phooaaawww this all a bit much guys I'm just looking to get into code" brilliant go for it if you're like "well I don't fully agree with what he is saying" then cool join the debate just don't put other people off with confusing sentences about systems which are largely agnostic.


tldr: Pick whichever language you like. Personally I'd go for the most popular one.

This is purely from an Azure perspective, as I said in my original comment, and in the long term it doesn't matter, as I said in my original comment

I wasn't talking about virtual machines (IAAS), I was thinking about everything else which with Azure is lot. App Services DO now support Ruby, they didn't until a year ago, you'd have to check each part. e.g. Azure functions support Python but don't support Ruby

docs.microsoft.com/en-…ges

This kind of sums it up. If you don't agree with the comment I'll let you take it up with Mr Hanselman

hanselman.com/blo…spx
"Running Ruby on Rails on Windows has historically sucked. Most of the Ruby/Rails folks are Mac and Linux users and haven't focused on getting Rails to be usable for daily development on Windows"

I'm guessing you're Linux based, I would argue that someone asking for a first programming language is likely to be Windows based
Ah whatever it might have sucked but it's always been possible it's just that windows is not a good choice for a lot of reasons unless you plan on using a Windows based deployment server as I've always believed in developing in the same os as you're deploying to or at least a similar one, Mac and Linux for web is obvious choice.

Azure is an interesting choice and python on Azure seems an even more interesting choice when there appears to be better options out there but each to their own. I know a lot of people who use it, they're happy enough.

There's a different way of thinking for Windows based developers and, frankly, I don't get it.

I see from your previous comment when you said the language that is easiest to use with the cloud was simply because you were still referring to the choice between ruby and python and becuase you use Azure.

I reccomend Rackspace. And again a tl:dr for "the cloud" to uninitiated is "the cloud is a meaningless concept which describes virtual machines which underneath all the words are actual real machines like before 'the cloud' was ever talked about" or "there really is no cloud" there is only the present where computers are better than they used to be. So like you say if you're developing for "the cloud" (??) then choose whatever you like.

Good luck everyone.
Edited by: "Schwifty" 26th Sep 2018
Schwifty1 h, 36 m ago

Ah whatever it might have sucked but it's always been possible it's just …Ah whatever it might have sucked but it's always been possible it's just that windows is not a good choice for a lot of reasons unless you plan on using a Windows based deployment server as I've always believed in developing in the same os as you're deploying to or at least a similar one, Mac and Linux for web is obvious choice. Azure is an interesting choice and python on Azure seems an even more interesting choice when there appears to be better options out there but each to their own. I know a lot of people who use it, they're happy enough. There's a different way of thinking for Windows based developers and, frankly, I don't get it.I see from your previous comment when you said the language that is easiest to use with the cloud was simply because you were still referring to the choice between ruby and python and becuase you use Azure. I reccomend Rackspace. And again a tl:dr for "the cloud" to uninitiated is "the cloud is a meaningless concept which describes virtual machines which underneath all the words are actual real machines like before 'the cloud' was ever talked about" or "there really is no cloud" there is only the present where computers are better than they used to be. So like you say if you're developing for "the cloud" (??) then choose whatever you like. Good luck everyone.


From a hardware perspective the cloud is someone else's machine, from a software perspective you have IAAS, PAAS and SAAS (and others). IAAS = choose what you like, the others are more restrictive on what you can use.

Oddly enough the company I work for used to use Rackspace, but they moved away from them for financial reasons
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Worked for me on 13th October, not expired.
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