LED Lenser SEO7-R Rechargeable Head Torch from UK Tool Centre for £47.75
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LED Lenser SEO7-R Rechargeable Head Torch from UK Tool Centre for £47.75

23
Found 4th Jul 2016
This is an excellent head torch that I have had for a couple of years now. It is very bright and comes with a Lithium Ion battery that can be charged using a micro USB (mobile phone) charger. You can also power it using 3 AAA batteries.

Here's a review of it: youtube.com/wat…rus

This usually retails for around £70. You can actually get it for less than the £47.75 by going to a Go Outdoors store and asking them to beat the price. They'll then take 10% off the UK Tool Centre price and do it for £42.98.
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23 Comments
I do not get it?

Why not just buy one half the price & use rechargeable batteries rather than have to plug it in to a laptop or power supply with a usb socket?

Not voting
YouDontWantToKnow

I do not get it?Why not just buy one half the price & use rechargeable … I do not get it?Why not just buy one half the price & use rechargeable batteries rather than have to plug it in to a laptop or power supply with a usb socket?Not voting



​post one then at half the price, with the same specs and after sale support.
I agree this is a great little head torch,very bright and weighs next to nothing, nothing half the price is this bright and as well built and reliable
northwales

​post one then at half the price, with the same specs and after sale s … ​post one then at half the price, with the same specs and after sale support.




If it's any good, you would not need "after sales support". Get a grip, FGS.
Magister

If it's any good, you would not need "after sales support". Get a grip, … If it's any good, you would not need "after sales support". Get a grip, FGS.



​yeah like nothing has ever broke down. these carry a 5 year warranty.

plank
northwales

​post one then at half the price, with the same specs and after sale s … ​post one then at half the price, with the same specs and after sale support.



Loads available by Lenser at half the price. The difference being you just replace rechargeable batteries as opposed to the gimmick of the ability to plug this one in.

I am a great fan of Lenser but really? Are you going to plug this into your laptop to charge? No

You just get rechargeable batteries, which you need with this product & just charge the as per normal & save yourself £20.
northwales

​yeah like nothing has ever broke down. these carry a 5 year w … ​yeah like nothing has ever broke down. these carry a 5 year warranty.plank



So do other Lensers at half the price without a "usb charging function"
YouDontWantToKnow

Loads available by Lenser at half the price. The difference being you … Loads available by Lenser at half the price. The difference being you just replace rechargeable batteries as opposed to the gimmick of the ability to plug this one in.I am a great fan of Lenser but really? Are you going to plug this into your laptop to charge? NoYou just get rechargeable batteries, which you need with this product & just charge the as per normal & save yourself £20.



​not within the seo range there isn't.
There are better options available at this price, but invariably they involve buying a separate 18650 battery and charger on top.
the micro usb charging would be good with portable chargers... or portable solar packs... not plug into laptop
multi day hikes
So when the battery fails in this, you have to buy a new torch. That's why the smart Money is on separate batteries you can swap between devices.
Roger_Irrelevant

So when the battery fails in this, you have to buy a new torch. That's … So when the battery fails in this, you have to buy a new torch. That's why the smart Money is on separate batteries you can swap between devices.



​no, can buy a new battery or pop the battery pack out and it in 3xAA batteries
I stopped buying premium brands when I found the stuff I could get from China for around the VAT on the premium item, was brighter and better. Aftersales is non-existent but in general the quality isn't that bad at all, but the fact I can get way more light for a lower cost, this makes more sense, imho.

mike
mbuckhurst

I stopped buying premium brands when I found the stuff I could get from … I stopped buying premium brands when I found the stuff I could get from China for around the VAT on the premium item, was brighter and better. Aftersales is non-existent but in general the quality isn't that bad at all, but the fact I can get way more light for a lower cost, this makes more sense, imho.mike


Can you post something please? I lost my old Pretzl in some Vietnam paddy field while lost on my motorbike.
mbuckhurst

I stopped buying premium brands when I found the stuff I could get from … I stopped buying premium brands when I found the stuff I could get from China for around the VAT on the premium item, was brighter and better. Aftersales is non-existent but in general the quality isn't that bad at all, but the fact I can get way more light for a lower cost, this makes more sense, imho.mike


Can you link to something
mbuckhurst

I stopped buying premium brands when I found the stuff I could get from … I stopped buying premium brands when I found the stuff I could get from China for around the VAT on the premium item, was brighter and better. Aftersales is non-existent but in general the quality isn't that bad at all, but the fact I can get way more light for a lower cost, this makes more sense, imho.mike



​ok fair brighter maybe, but better, seriously doubt that. the cheap and cheerful stuff from eBay or aliexpress China is ok (bought load from both), but quality is not a word would use.

These are designed to be handled roughly, worn for long periods of time, whilst running, SAR, and so on. The cheapies not so.

If you are planning on using this to run be aware the battery is at the front and in my experience it can cause the light to bounce quite a lot which is off putting at best. Good price though.
northwales

​ok fair brighter maybe, but better, seriously doubt that. the cheap and c … ​ok fair brighter maybe, but better, seriously doubt that. the cheap and cheerful stuff from eBay or aliexpress China is ok (bought load from both), but quality is not a word would use.These are designed to be handled roughly, worn for long periods of time, whilst running, SAR, and so on. The cheapies not so.



Quality isn't that bad is what I said, I've got around 6 bike lights that all convert to head torches, my original set were bought around 6 years ago and have probably done 1000s of miles in atrocious conditions in Manchester, still running fine on the original battery.

The only reason I upgrade is to get brighter newer LEDs, at the end of the day, being seen or being able to see is the most important reason behind a light like these, 220lm is frankly insulting at that price.

Of the ones I have these are some examples, although I can't vouch for the seller, but they give you an idea

ebay.co.uk/itm…623?hash=item3f41c31cf7:g:uEQAAOSwu-BWOwXg

Very, very bright, I use these on trails or areas without street lighting, battery isn't well waterproofed, so best to put a bag round them. I have one set of these I use throughout the summer (which usually means rain) at night to hunt for slugs in the garden, so around 1 hr per day for 2 or 3 months. These are probably the least reliable, I've had one battery fail (out of 5), 2 lights have failed, one of which shorted, got very hot and now no longer allows variation of the light output, but still works fine on full beam. The remaining lights still work. If buying these for cycling, buy two, so you've got a backup. Treat as an annual expense and you won't be disappointed, I'd estimate the lumens at more like 2000-3000 but not shoddy at all.

ebay.co.uk/itm…992?hash=item28085a00b8:g:~7kAAOSwo0JWQb27

My oldest LED light is like this one, not as bright as the earlier ones, but nevertheless completely outstrips pretty much anything from a UK based company under £100. Mine has an older LED but the design seems good.

ebay.co.uk/itm…293?hash=item3ac461031d:g:joEAAOSwoJZXRprX

Perhaps my favourite lights are similar to these, I couldn't find the listing I bought mine from

ebay.co.uk/itm…634?hash=item33aeb3d2fa:g:K58AAOSw5IJWd8at

These have the same spec and run off a USB battery pack, which is useful because you can use your own. My particular set cost around £6 without batteries, but came with a bulb cover, which turns the LED from a spot to a bulb, dead handy for camping.

These are just examples of cheap and cheerful LEDs that can be used as headlamps. I would say follow these rules and you'll be happy, in most cases they are pretty reliable and much better.

1) Never leave the battery pack charging unattended. When you feel the weight of the charger, you realise there's not much protection. If I can't find an alternative charger and have to use the supplied one, I charge in the kitchen next to the kettle so it's never unattended for long, I never charge overnight, just in case. The USB varieties of course don't have this problem.

2) On a bicycle I always carry a spare, some have a habit of dying without warning rather than getting dim, though I've found this is 50:50. I always carry a standard AA powered UK light for emergencies.

3) Don't believe the lumens advertised. Chinese sellers seem pretty lax when it comes to the truth, the lumens figure quoted is usually the max. the LED could deliver in ideal conditions, with a power supply way in excess of that supplied.

4) These are not lifetime purchases, if you get 2 or 3 years out of them be happy (if you're paying 1/4 the price for 10x the brightness, don't expect longevity), but with the way technology is moving, you might want to replace with newer brighter lights at that point anyway.

mike
northwales

​ok fair brighter maybe, but better, seriously doubt that. the cheap and c … ​ok fair brighter maybe, but better, seriously doubt that. the cheap and cheerful stuff from eBay or aliexpress China is ok (bought load from both), but quality is not a word would use.These are designed to be handled roughly, worn for long periods of time, whilst running, SAR, and so on. The cheapies not so.


Thrunite TH20 on Amazon would be my choice for a high quality headlight
mbuckhurst

Quality isn't that bad is what I said, I've got around 6 bike lights that … Quality isn't that bad is what I said, I've got around 6 bike lights that all convert to head torches, my original set were bought around 6 years ago and have probably done 1000s of miles in atrocious conditions in Manchester, still running fine on the original battery. The only reason I upgrade is to get brighter newer LEDs, at the end of the day, being seen or being able to see is the most important reason behind a light like these, 220lm is frankly insulting at that price. Of the ones I have these are some examples, although I can't vouch for the seller, but they give you an idea http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5000Lm-2x-CREE-XM-L-U2-LED-Front-Headlamp-Bicycle-Bike-Light-Torch-Headlight-/271686245623?hash=item3f41c31cf7:g:uEQAAOSwu-BWOwXgVery, very bright, I use these on trails or areas without street lighting, battery isn't well waterproofed, so best to put a bag round them. I have one set of these I use throughout the summer (which usually means rain) at night to hunt for slugs in the garden, so around 1 hr per day for 2 or 3 months. These are probably the least reliable, I've had one battery fail (out of 5), 2 lights have failed, one of which shorted, got very hot and now no longer allows variation of the light output, but still works fine on full beam. The remaining lights still work. If buying these for cycling, buy two, so you've got a backup. Treat as an annual expense and you won't be disappointed, I'd estimate the lumens at more like 2000-3000 but not shoddy at all.http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2000-Lm-CREE-XM-L-XML-T6-LED-Bicycle-Bike-Head-Light-Headlamp-Rechargeable-Light-/171938807992?hash=item28085a00b8:g:~7kAAOSwo0JWQb27My oldest LED light is like this one, not as bright as the earlier ones, but nevertheless completely outstrips pretty much anything from a UK based company under £100. Mine has an older LED but the design seems good.http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cycle-Bike-Head-Bicycle-Light-Lamp-CREE-XML-XM-L-T6-LED-UK-Charger-3-Modes-/252402795293?hash=item3ac461031d:g:joEAAOSwoJZXRprXPerhaps my favourite lights are similar to these, I couldn't find the listing I bought mine fromhttp://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2000LM-USB-CREE-XM-L-T6-L2-LED-Light-Front-Bike-Flashlight-Headlight-Headlamp-/221974352634?hash=item33aeb3d2fa:g:K58AAOSw5IJWd8atThese have the same spec and run off a USB battery pack, which is useful because you can use your own. My particular set cost around £6 without batteries, but came with a bulb cover, which turns the LED from a spot to a bulb, dead handy for camping.These are just examples of cheap and cheerful LEDs that can be used as headlamps. I would say follow these rules and you'll be happy, in most cases they are pretty reliable and much better.1) Never leave the battery pack charging unattended. When you feel the weight of the charger, you realise there's not much protection. If I can't find an alternative charger and have to use the supplied one, I charge in the kitchen next to the kettle so it's never unattended for long, I never charge overnight, just in case. The USB varieties of course don't have this problem.2) On a bicycle I always carry a spare, some have a habit of dying without warning rather than getting dim, though I've found this is 50:50. I always carry a standard AA powered UK light for emergencies.3) Don't believe the lumens advertised. Chinese sellers seem pretty lax when it comes to the truth, the lumens figure quoted is usually the max. the LED could deliver in ideal conditions, with a power supply way in excess of that supplied. 4) These are not lifetime purchases, if you get 2 or 3 years out of them be happy (if you're paying 1/4 the price for 10x the brightness, don't expect longevity), but with the way technology is moving, you might want to replace with newer brighter lights at that point anyway.mike




Only 1 of your links work. As you say dont believe the lumens advertised, but your wrong on the max it could deliver. An xml t6 can only deliver a max of 1020lm driven at full power, most of the cheap chinese is only about 50%. So a 1800lm t6 will be more like 500lm (if your lucky).

The 5000lm dual XML U2, can only be driven at a max of about 1000lm and having 2 does gives twice the light either, so you are looking at about 800 emitter lumens max.

AS for newer tech, T6 has been out for a good 5 years now, so very old in led terms.

As for brighter is better, yeah other road users really love to have those lights blinding them.
northwales

Only 1 of your links work. As you say dont believe the lumens advertised, … Only 1 of your links work. As you say dont believe the lumens advertised, but your wrong on the max it could deliver. An xml t6 can only deliver a max of 1020lm driven at full power, most of the cheap chinese is only about 50%. So a 1800lm t6 will be more like 500lm (if your lucky).The 5000lm dual XML U2, can only be driven at a max of about 1000lm and having 2 does gives twice the light either, so you are looking at about 800 emitter lumens max. AS for newer tech, T6 has been out for a good 5 years now, so very old in led terms. As for brighter is better, yeah other road users really love to have those lights blinding them.


Not many road users up the side of a mountain where I use mine I think battery life is far more valuable to a user than brightness. Also having that extra brightness spread over a wider area, so in effect it is the same brightness giving a wider field of view, might be useful in some circumstances. If brighter isn't better Tesco sell head torches for £5 and Poundland probably have some.
northwales

Only 1 of your links work. As you say dont believe the lumens advertised, … Only 1 of your links work. As you say dont believe the lumens advertised, but your wrong on the max it could deliver. An xml t6 can only deliver a max of 1020lm driven at full power, most of the cheap chinese is only about 50%. So a 1800lm t6 will be more like 500lm (if your lucky).The 5000lm dual XML U2, can only be driven at a max of about 1000lm and having 2 does gives twice the light either, so you are looking at about 800 emitter lumens max. AS for newer tech, T6 has been out for a good 5 years now, so very old in led terms. As for brighter is better, yeah other road users really love to have those lights blinding them.



What LED chip is in the SE07?

Subjectively I reckon I get 600 lumens from my T6, certainly in a dark room my photographic light meter reads the same as a Philips 650 lumen spot lamp moved to give the same beam radius. So maybe the Chinese lamps aren't so far from running the Crees at their maximum output, which considering the ease of driving an LED, it's not hard to achieve, I'm not entirely sure why we'd expect the Chinese lamps to be 50% down on power output. Regardless of anything else for 1/4 the price I get 2-3x the quoted output of the SE07.

As for being bright, that's surely the whole point of a light? A car headlamp is going to output in 1000s of lumens, so long as a bike light is used correctly and points down at the road, what's the problem, yeah there are those that cycle with them pointing to blind oncoming traffic, but equally well plenty of cars do the same, as a cyclist, I seem not to count as a road user where car users care about dipping.

I'm sure this is a lovely headlight and produces plenty of light, but you're paying a hefty premium for the name.

mike
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