LEGO Technic Land Rover Defender Collector's Model Car 42110 now £128 using code @ Argos
935°

LEGO Technic Land Rover Defender Collector's Model Car 42110 now £128 using code @ Argos

£128£159.9920%Argos Deals
34
Posted 6th Nov
Standard price £160 using code toys20 reduces the price to £128.

Probably the best chance i have to get a new defender lol

All credit to goonertillidie for posting the original 20% off code
Community Updates
Quote the code TOYS20 instore at till for sbove discount.

You can also use the cod eonline but postage costs apply.


This collectible model of the quintessential Land Rover Defender captures the vehicle's level of refinement with its clean, modern lines and sculpted surfaces, making it a great display piece for the home or office.

LEGO® model number: 42110 - for ages 11 years and over.

Theme: LEGO Technic.

  • Features authentically designed bodywork with Land Rover emblems, original-design rims with ground-gripping tyres, plus a detailed cabin.
  • Also features removable roof rack with storage box, pannier, ladder and traction mats, opening doors, bonnet and rear door.
  • Cabin features a detailed dashboard, working steering wheel and forward-folding rear seats that reveal the 4-speed sequential gearbox.
  • Functions include a 4-speed sequential gearbox, All Wheel Drive with 3 differentials, independent suspension and detailed 6-cylinder engine.
  • New-for-October-2019 transmission system with 2 levers for engaging high or low gear ratios and a selector for changing gear.


  • Size H480, W582, D91cm.
  • For ages 3 years and over.
  • EAN: 5702016604115.

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Top comments
If you're playing with this as an adult - have a word with yourself.

If your kids are playing with this - tell them to put it back on the shelf!
Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:

2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Flawed engineering
Let me explain you why I given a poor rating to this set.

I am a Lego Technic collection since 1980s. I own legendary sets like 8880, 8479 and in recent times Mercedes Arocs Truck, Porsche 911, Extreme Off-roader etc. You can check my reviews of other Lego sets.

I had very high hope of this Land Rover, especially with 4 sequential gears x 2 Hi-Lo sets, totalling in 8 speed reductions. After opening the box I found 21 packets, marked 1 to 4 + wheels/tyres + stickers. The chassis is completed by step 302 (completing all 1-packets and halfway thru 2-packets).

The gearbox was a shame. To create 8-speed transmissions, Lego had to use lots of parts and this gave rise to huge amount of friction. The problem was further complicated by use of some universal joins at awkward angles. These joins do not behave linearly (there are demos in YouTube for this set, explaining the issue). In short, instead of transmitting rotations from one cog to another, these type of construction transfers rotations to cogs from one end to another end in a non-linear manner. This means, if you rotate cog A continuously, another cog B (connected via lots of axles, clutches, join etc.) do not continuously rotate but cog B "jumps" suddenly while rotating. This leads to cracking noise because some cogs' teeth jam within adjacent cogs' teeth (because it wants to rotate but cannot).

I have created a summary below in which gears you are likely to face this problem.

1st gear is when you can't downshift [-] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do so
4th gear is when you can't upshift [+] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do so

L-1 = works ok
L-2 = works ok
L-3 = some cracking noise, some resistance
L-4 = continuous cracking noise, more resistance
H-1 = works ok
H-2 = works ok
H-3 = continuous cracking, lots of resistance
H-4 = continuous cracking, lots of resistance

When looking from port side [steering side] - top view.

Clutch at Bottom 1-3
Clutch at Top 2-4

Now why we have this problem? The short answer is bad design by Lego. In other sets, e.g. Porsche 911 set # 42056 the (fake) engine was at rear and it drove only rear wheels via 4-speed sequential transmission. So the "rotation" had to travel short distance. In Land Rover 42110, the engine is at the front, the sequential gearbox (4-speed) is at the rear, and DNR + Hi-Lo selectors are at the middle. It also has 3 differentials for being 4WD vehicle. This causes huge length of power transmission - requiring too many cogs + odd angle UV joins. This led to poor playability experience. To prove this, if you take out the UV connector (red axle on passenger side), the playability improves but then your fake engine is no longer driven!

__ Power transfer path __

Engine revolution is transferred via passenger side red shaft to 4-speed gearbox at the back of the chassis. After speed reduction, it transfers [from rear, as output of gear box] via passenger side grey shaft to front and then goes to DNR/Hi-Lo clutches. From there it transfers to center differential and then to front and rear differentials and finally to wheels.

So the path is: engine -> [red shaft] -> rear gearbox -> [grey shaft] -> middle gearbox -> differentials -> wheels

When you are pushing the car, the wheels are effectively running the engine [opposite to real life cars]. So the path of rotation transfer is exactly opposite of what is written above i.e. it goes from right to left <-, starting from wheels and ending in fake engine.

The model, when completed, does look good aesthetically. But Technic is all about engineering, where I think Lego has let us down!
patrick_00006/11/2019 08:34

Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:2.0 out of 5 starsVerified P …Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:2.0 out of 5 starsVerified PurchaseFlawed engineeringLet me explain you why I given a poor rating to this set.I am a Lego Technic collection since 1980s. I own legendary sets like 8880, 8479 and in recent times Mercedes Arocs Truck, Porsche 911, Extreme Off-roader etc. You can check my reviews of other Lego sets.I had very high hope of this Land Rover, especially with 4 sequential gears x 2 Hi-Lo sets, totalling in 8 speed reductions. After opening the box I found 21 packets, marked 1 to 4 + wheels/tyres + stickers. The chassis is completed by step 302 (completing all 1-packets and halfway thru 2-packets).The gearbox was a shame. To create 8-speed transmissions, Lego had to use lots of parts and this gave rise to huge amount of friction. The problem was further complicated by use of some universal joins at awkward angles. These joins do not behave linearly (there are demos in YouTube for this set, explaining the issue). In short, instead of transmitting rotations from one cog to another, these type of construction transfers rotations to cogs from one end to another end in a non-linear manner. This means, if you rotate cog A continuously, another cog B (connected via lots of axles, clutches, join etc.) do not continuously rotate but cog B "jumps" suddenly while rotating. This leads to cracking noise because some cogs' teeth jam within adjacent cogs' teeth (because it wants to rotate but cannot).I have created a summary below in which gears you are likely to face this problem.1st gear is when you can't downshift [-] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do so4th gear is when you can't upshift [+] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do soL-1 = works okL-2 = works okL-3 = some cracking noise, some resistanceL-4 = continuous cracking noise, more resistanceH-1 = works okH-2 = works okH-3 = continuous cracking, lots of resistanceH-4 = continuous cracking, lots of resistanceWhen looking from port side [steering side] - top view.Clutch at Bottom 1-3Clutch at Top 2-4Now why we have this problem? The short answer is bad design by Lego. In other sets, e.g. Porsche 911 set # 42056 the (fake) engine was at rear and it drove only rear wheels via 4-speed sequential transmission. So the "rotation" had to travel short distance. In Land Rover 42110, the engine is at the front, the sequential gearbox (4-speed) is at the rear, and DNR + Hi-Lo selectors are at the middle. It also has 3 differentials for being 4WD vehicle. This causes huge length of power transmission - requiring too many cogs + odd angle UV joins. This led to poor playability experience. To prove this, if you take out the UV connector (red axle on passenger side), the playability improves but then your fake engine is no longer driven!__ Power transfer path __Engine revolution is transferred via passenger side red shaft to 4-speed gearbox at the back of the chassis. After speed reduction, it transfers [from rear, as output of gear box] via passenger side grey shaft to front and then goes to DNR/Hi-Lo clutches. From there it transfers to center differential and then to front and rear differentials and finally to wheels.So the path is: engine -> [red shaft] -> rear gearbox -> [grey shaft] -> middle gearbox -> differentials -> wheelsWhen you are pushing the car, the wheels are effectively running the engine [opposite to real life cars]. So the path of rotation transfer is exactly opposite of what is written above i.e. it goes from right to left <-, starting from wheels and ending in fake engine.The model, when completed, does look good aesthetically. But Technic is all about engineering, where I think Lego has let us down!


I wonder how many people actually "play" with these models rather than just build them and then display? As this review says, the playability is let down but aethetically it looks good ...

And another (not so detailed, but a difference of opinion from a different perspective) -

I purchased this from Argos as it was in stock 5 mins away, I’m 38 years old and wanted to find something to occupy my mind a little so decided to start doing some Lego sets... this was the first one.

It’s taken me about 8 hours or so in total to build, though I did spread that over 2 days.

It was very fun to build, and seeing the finished working product is awesome, it’s pretty big (43cm long) and all things work great and as should.

Is it worth £160? Yes it is if you like doing this sort of thing or like collecting the big sets, I paid £145 as Argos had 10% off, I would have been happy paying the full price.

If you are thinking of buying this just go for it, it’s awesome!

Happy building everyone.
34 Comments
Same price at Amazon if your Argos is out of stock ...
erics06/11/2019 07:33

Same price at Amazon if your Argos is out of stock ...


If? It’s always out of stock.
Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:

2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Flawed engineering
Let me explain you why I given a poor rating to this set.

I am a Lego Technic collection since 1980s. I own legendary sets like 8880, 8479 and in recent times Mercedes Arocs Truck, Porsche 911, Extreme Off-roader etc. You can check my reviews of other Lego sets.

I had very high hope of this Land Rover, especially with 4 sequential gears x 2 Hi-Lo sets, totalling in 8 speed reductions. After opening the box I found 21 packets, marked 1 to 4 + wheels/tyres + stickers. The chassis is completed by step 302 (completing all 1-packets and halfway thru 2-packets).

The gearbox was a shame. To create 8-speed transmissions, Lego had to use lots of parts and this gave rise to huge amount of friction. The problem was further complicated by use of some universal joins at awkward angles. These joins do not behave linearly (there are demos in YouTube for this set, explaining the issue). In short, instead of transmitting rotations from one cog to another, these type of construction transfers rotations to cogs from one end to another end in a non-linear manner. This means, if you rotate cog A continuously, another cog B (connected via lots of axles, clutches, join etc.) do not continuously rotate but cog B "jumps" suddenly while rotating. This leads to cracking noise because some cogs' teeth jam within adjacent cogs' teeth (because it wants to rotate but cannot).

I have created a summary below in which gears you are likely to face this problem.

1st gear is when you can't downshift [-] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do so
4th gear is when you can't upshift [+] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do so

L-1 = works ok
L-2 = works ok
L-3 = some cracking noise, some resistance
L-4 = continuous cracking noise, more resistance
H-1 = works ok
H-2 = works ok
H-3 = continuous cracking, lots of resistance
H-4 = continuous cracking, lots of resistance

When looking from port side [steering side] - top view.

Clutch at Bottom 1-3
Clutch at Top 2-4

Now why we have this problem? The short answer is bad design by Lego. In other sets, e.g. Porsche 911 set # 42056 the (fake) engine was at rear and it drove only rear wheels via 4-speed sequential transmission. So the "rotation" had to travel short distance. In Land Rover 42110, the engine is at the front, the sequential gearbox (4-speed) is at the rear, and DNR + Hi-Lo selectors are at the middle. It also has 3 differentials for being 4WD vehicle. This causes huge length of power transmission - requiring too many cogs + odd angle UV joins. This led to poor playability experience. To prove this, if you take out the UV connector (red axle on passenger side), the playability improves but then your fake engine is no longer driven!

__ Power transfer path __

Engine revolution is transferred via passenger side red shaft to 4-speed gearbox at the back of the chassis. After speed reduction, it transfers [from rear, as output of gear box] via passenger side grey shaft to front and then goes to DNR/Hi-Lo clutches. From there it transfers to center differential and then to front and rear differentials and finally to wheels.

So the path is: engine -> [red shaft] -> rear gearbox -> [grey shaft] -> middle gearbox -> differentials -> wheels

When you are pushing the car, the wheels are effectively running the engine [opposite to real life cars]. So the path of rotation transfer is exactly opposite of what is written above i.e. it goes from right to left <-, starting from wheels and ending in fake engine.

The model, when completed, does look good aesthetically. But Technic is all about engineering, where I think Lego has let us down!
A good likeness but this is the only time a porsche is (way) cheaper lol
Tempting. And if you link up your Nectar card, 3000 extra points
patrick_00006/11/2019 08:34

Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:2.0 out of 5 starsVerified P …Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:2.0 out of 5 starsVerified PurchaseFlawed engineeringLet me explain you why I given a poor rating to this set.I am a Lego Technic collection since 1980s. I own legendary sets like 8880, 8479 and in recent times Mercedes Arocs Truck, Porsche 911, Extreme Off-roader etc. You can check my reviews of other Lego sets.I had very high hope of this Land Rover, especially with 4 sequential gears x 2 Hi-Lo sets, totalling in 8 speed reductions. After opening the box I found 21 packets, marked 1 to 4 + wheels/tyres + stickers. The chassis is completed by step 302 (completing all 1-packets and halfway thru 2-packets).The gearbox was a shame. To create 8-speed transmissions, Lego had to use lots of parts and this gave rise to huge amount of friction. The problem was further complicated by use of some universal joins at awkward angles. These joins do not behave linearly (there are demos in YouTube for this set, explaining the issue). In short, instead of transmitting rotations from one cog to another, these type of construction transfers rotations to cogs from one end to another end in a non-linear manner. This means, if you rotate cog A continuously, another cog B (connected via lots of axles, clutches, join etc.) do not continuously rotate but cog B "jumps" suddenly while rotating. This leads to cracking noise because some cogs' teeth jam within adjacent cogs' teeth (because it wants to rotate but cannot).I have created a summary below in which gears you are likely to face this problem.1st gear is when you can't downshift [-] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do so4th gear is when you can't upshift [+] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do soL-1 = works okL-2 = works okL-3 = some cracking noise, some resistanceL-4 = continuous cracking noise, more resistanceH-1 = works okH-2 = works okH-3 = continuous cracking, lots of resistanceH-4 = continuous cracking, lots of resistanceWhen looking from port side [steering side] - top view.Clutch at Bottom 1-3Clutch at Top 2-4Now why we have this problem? The short answer is bad design by Lego. In other sets, e.g. Porsche 911 set # 42056 the (fake) engine was at rear and it drove only rear wheels via 4-speed sequential transmission. So the "rotation" had to travel short distance. In Land Rover 42110, the engine is at the front, the sequential gearbox (4-speed) is at the rear, and DNR + Hi-Lo selectors are at the middle. It also has 3 differentials for being 4WD vehicle. This causes huge length of power transmission - requiring too many cogs + odd angle UV joins. This led to poor playability experience. To prove this, if you take out the UV connector (red axle on passenger side), the playability improves but then your fake engine is no longer driven!__ Power transfer path __Engine revolution is transferred via passenger side red shaft to 4-speed gearbox at the back of the chassis. After speed reduction, it transfers [from rear, as output of gear box] via passenger side grey shaft to front and then goes to DNR/Hi-Lo clutches. From there it transfers to center differential and then to front and rear differentials and finally to wheels.So the path is: engine -> [red shaft] -> rear gearbox -> [grey shaft] -> middle gearbox -> differentials -> wheelsWhen you are pushing the car, the wheels are effectively running the engine [opposite to real life cars]. So the path of rotation transfer is exactly opposite of what is written above i.e. it goes from right to left <-, starting from wheels and ending in fake engine.The model, when completed, does look good aesthetically. But Technic is all about engineering, where I think Lego has let us down!


I wonder how many people actually "play" with these models rather than just build them and then display? As this review says, the playability is let down but aethetically it looks good ...

And another (not so detailed, but a difference of opinion from a different perspective) -

I purchased this from Argos as it was in stock 5 mins away, I’m 38 years old and wanted to find something to occupy my mind a little so decided to start doing some Lego sets... this was the first one.

It’s taken me about 8 hours or so in total to build, though I did spread that over 2 days.

It was very fun to build, and seeing the finished working product is awesome, it’s pretty big (43cm long) and all things work great and as should.

Is it worth £160? Yes it is if you like doing this sort of thing or like collecting the big sets, I paid £145 as Argos had 10% off, I would have been happy paying the full price.

If you are thinking of buying this just go for it, it’s awesome!

Happy building everyone.
It’s just a display lego build it then display it and say I built that lol
If you're playing with this as an adult - have a word with yourself.

If your kids are playing with this - tell them to put it back on the shelf!
patrick_00006/11/2019 08:34

Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:2.0 out of 5 starsVerified P …Here’s a detailed review from Amazon:2.0 out of 5 starsVerified PurchaseFlawed engineeringLet me explain you why I given a poor rating to this set.I am a Lego Technic collection since 1980s. I own legendary sets like 8880, 8479 and in recent times Mercedes Arocs Truck, Porsche 911, Extreme Off-roader etc. You can check my reviews of other Lego sets.I had very high hope of this Land Rover, especially with 4 sequential gears x 2 Hi-Lo sets, totalling in 8 speed reductions. After opening the box I found 21 packets, marked 1 to 4 + wheels/tyres + stickers. The chassis is completed by step 302 (completing all 1-packets and halfway thru 2-packets).The gearbox was a shame. To create 8-speed transmissions, Lego had to use lots of parts and this gave rise to huge amount of friction. The problem was further complicated by use of some universal joins at awkward angles. These joins do not behave linearly (there are demos in YouTube for this set, explaining the issue). In short, instead of transmitting rotations from one cog to another, these type of construction transfers rotations to cogs from one end to another end in a non-linear manner. This means, if you rotate cog A continuously, another cog B (connected via lots of axles, clutches, join etc.) do not continuously rotate but cog B "jumps" suddenly while rotating. This leads to cracking noise because some cogs' teeth jam within adjacent cogs' teeth (because it wants to rotate but cannot).I have created a summary below in which gears you are likely to face this problem.1st gear is when you can't downshift [-] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do so4th gear is when you can't upshift [+] any more - you will find lots of resistance if you try to do soL-1 = works okL-2 = works okL-3 = some cracking noise, some resistanceL-4 = continuous cracking noise, more resistanceH-1 = works okH-2 = works okH-3 = continuous cracking, lots of resistanceH-4 = continuous cracking, lots of resistanceWhen looking from port side [steering side] - top view.Clutch at Bottom 1-3Clutch at Top 2-4Now why we have this problem? The short answer is bad design by Lego. In other sets, e.g. Porsche 911 set # 42056 the (fake) engine was at rear and it drove only rear wheels via 4-speed sequential transmission. So the "rotation" had to travel short distance. In Land Rover 42110, the engine is at the front, the sequential gearbox (4-speed) is at the rear, and DNR + Hi-Lo selectors are at the middle. It also has 3 differentials for being 4WD vehicle. This causes huge length of power transmission - requiring too many cogs + odd angle UV joins. This led to poor playability experience. To prove this, if you take out the UV connector (red axle on passenger side), the playability improves but then your fake engine is no longer driven!__ Power transfer path __Engine revolution is transferred via passenger side red shaft to 4-speed gearbox at the back of the chassis. After speed reduction, it transfers [from rear, as output of gear box] via passenger side grey shaft to front and then goes to DNR/Hi-Lo clutches. From there it transfers to center differential and then to front and rear differentials and finally to wheels.So the path is: engine -> [red shaft] -> rear gearbox -> [grey shaft] -> middle gearbox -> differentials -> wheelsWhen you are pushing the car, the wheels are effectively running the engine [opposite to real life cars]. So the path of rotation transfer is exactly opposite of what is written above i.e. it goes from right to left <-, starting from wheels and ending in fake engine.The model, when completed, does look good aesthetically. But Technic is all about engineering, where I think Lego has let us down!


Nerd alert!
The price is too high for this one. Or maybe I am just not the biggest lego fan
erics06/11/2019 09:43

I wonder how many people actually "play" with these models rather than …I wonder how many people actually "play" with these models rather than just build them and then display? As this review says, the playability is let down but aethetically it looks good ...And another (not so detailed, but a difference of opinion from a different perspective) - I purchased this from Argos as it was in stock 5 mins away, I’m 38 years old and wanted to find something to occupy my mind a little so decided to start doing some Lego sets... this was the first one.It’s taken me about 8 hours or so in total to build, though I did spread that over 2 days.It was very fun to build, and seeing the finished working product is awesome, it’s pretty big (43cm long) and all things work great and as should.Is it worth £160? Yes it is if you like doing this sort of thing or like collecting the big sets, I paid £145 as Argos had 10% off, I would have been happy paying the full price.If you are thinking of buying this just go for it, it’s awesome!Happy building everyone.


Oh man did I read this
This is the best looking one I've seen as it doesn't look like a car crash.
120 at Costco
Nectar currently doing 3000 points for £100 spend = £15 in points, so if linked you could spend £15 of points for free Which is what i am doing to get it for £113
If you're not fussy, the aliexpress clone is ~£57. I've had a few models now (star wars, Harry Potter) and all have been great and essentially identical with no issues. I've read moving parts aren't always as good, but it seems neither is the real one with this set anyway.
irondemi06/11/2019 11:37

The price is too high for this one. Or maybe I am just not the biggest …The price is too high for this one. Or maybe I am just not the biggest lego fan


The mark up on Lego must be massive.
Wonder if that going to rust away too
EddyHyde06/11/2019 13:39

Nectar currently doing 3000 points for £100 spend = £15 in points, so if l …Nectar currently doing 3000 points for £100 spend = £15 in points, so if linked you could spend £15 of points for free Which is what i am doing to get it for £113



Hi, I only have about 500 nectar points on my card, how do I get the 3000 points and spend them at the same time on this LEGO kit?
Junk.
Thats not a Defender, its a Range Rover isn't it?
Mabutu06/11/2019 18:05

Hi, I only have about 500 nectar points on my card, how do I get the 3000 …Hi, I only have about 500 nectar points on my card, how do I get the 3000 points and spend them at the same time on this LEGO kit?


You cant, you get the 3000 credited to account by purchasing it. Ive just bought it and it confirms 3000 on the receipt.
moreteavicar206/11/2019 18:36

Thats not a Defender, its a Range Rover isn't it?


It’s the new Defender. Nice bit of kit in reality too, but now more of a Chelsea Tractor than a proper work horse.
Thank christ I've got no kids....
Just brains.
So, it is true..
Fools and their money ARE easily parted... 😁
Is it just me of does the Lego version look better than the real one?
Just needs to come with a school to really set it in its habitat
TomBoyNI06/11/2019 19:10

It’s the new Defender. Nice bit of kit in reality too, but now more of a C …It’s the new Defender. Nice bit of kit in reality too, but now more of a Chelsea Tractor than a proper work horse.


Ugh... didn't even realise there was a new Defender.. they should've just let it rest in piece. Or remade it with identical body but modern tech inside. But no, lets make it look like a Tonka toy....

If anyone fancies a Lego of a real defender, check out "Sheepos Land Rover"... available either from the designer, or cheaper (though less moral of course) from some of the Chinese brick sellers... it's pricey, even in the knock-off format (about $150), but then it is almost 3500! pieces, and looks about a hundred times better than this fugly new one.
Dont know much about lego but that looks pretty cool
Thanks for posting we have added this to the Highlights section
If happy to pay before collecting Argos now giving 3000 Nectar points too for £100+ spend!
Dantooine06/11/2019 11:25

Nerd alert!


You’re better than that. It was a brilliant and detailed review.
LoR197707/11/2019 23:17

If happy to pay before collecting Argos now giving 3000 Nectar points too …If happy to pay before collecting Argos now giving 3000 Nectar points too for £100+ spend!


Ah, thanks for that - I bought another one after reading your message. Will return the first one. Thanks again
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