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LG 47LD450 47-inch Widescreen Full HD 1080p LCD TV with Freeview £602.99 delivered @ Amazon using code
LG 47LD450 47-inch Widescreen Full HD 1080p LCD TV with Freeview £602.99 delivered @ Amazon using code

LG 47LD450 47-inch Widescreen Full HD 1080p LCD TV with Freeview £602.99 delivered @ Amazon using code

Buy forBuy forBuy for£602.99
GETGet dealVisit site and get deal
Use code LGETVS1O to get this price.
* 47 inch HD-Ready 1080p with built in Freeview
* 2 HDMI inputs
* USB Input
* Slim Depth & Narrow frame
* Smart Energy Saving Plus and Clear Voice II

19 Comments

No freeview HD

skyscraper101;8851399

No freeview HD



Freeview HD increases the cost of the TV by like £200 anyway...

header says Full HD - detail says HD ready

bit confused?

good deal though - this model is £900 in Tesco and Currys

i thought 1080 was full hd

fatboy88;8851477

i thought 1080 was full hd



1080p is

1080p and 720p are both classified as HD Ready. HD Ready does NOT indicate the resolution of the screen it merely indicates that is is able to show an HD-input signal straight out of the box. The most early LCD and Plasma TVs did not have the resolution to show an HD signal, believe it or not.

Only 1080p is FULL HD. If a TV has a resolution of 1920 x 1080 it is always full HD. Does that clear things up?

By the way, in my opinion you are better off buying a 50" Plasma if you're going to spend £600 on a TV. There are some good ones about, some of which featured on this very forum recently (can't be bothered to search for one right now). Reason being, the larger an LCD panel, the larger the backlight needs to be. The larger the light, the more light it produces, leading to a greater degree of colour washout. Plasma TVs do not suffer from this problem and are a much better choice at this size - take a trip into Currys and compare a 50" LCD to a 50" Plasma and you'll see. Don't believe the stupid internet rumours about screen-burn, you have to be a complete idiot to burn a modern plasma, like leaving a DVD paused for a few hours.

Deal_HUNT3R;8851540

Better deal imo]LG 50PK590 50-inch Widescreen Full HD 1080p 600Hz Plasma … Better deal imo]LG 50PK590 50-inch Widescreen Full HD 1080p 600Hz Plasma TV with Freeview HD



I would agree

Interestingly I found that the power consumption of this LCD is 260 watts (]Source) compared to 190 watts for the bigger plasma (]Source 1, ]Source 2)

Remember plasma also has much more realistic picture, deep blacks, perfect viewing angles and no motion blur.

With this particular Plasma your getting +3 inches and Freeview HD.

A little more expensive though.

Hi all
the LG 50PK590 looks like a very nice tv and has wi-fi etc, but they don't seem to make a 42" or similar

Anyone know what the closest plasma in spec & quality is to the LG 50PK590?

thanks

Banned

Theres FULL HD and there is DULL HD

Full HD is 1080p.

HD Ready is 420p, 720p and 1080i



What this tv is, **** knows, it says full HD in one place and HD ready in another. Also, i would personally like atleast 3 hdmi slots, but the price is quite good (if its Full hd)

Price gone up to £669.99 now.

Adnan786;8855569

Theres FULL HD and there is DULL HDFull HD is 1080p.HD Ready is 420p, … Theres FULL HD and there is DULL HDFull HD is 1080p.HD Ready is 420p, 720p and 1080iWhat this tv is, **** knows, it says full HD in one place and HD ready in another. Also, i would personally like atleast 3 hdmi slots, but the price is quite good (if its Full hd)



There's no such thing as 420p, it's 480p and it's not HD Ready at all. It's classified as EDTV which is Enhanced Definition. I've already explained what this TV is and what HD Ready and Full HD means - you're talking rubbish. 720p and 1080i are resolutions. HD Ready means that the TV can accept an HD input signal, so 1080p is also HD Ready.

Banned

morocco1;8856198

There's no such thing as 420p, it's 480p and it's not HD Ready at all. … There's no such thing as 420p, it's 480p and it's not HD Ready at all. It's classified as EDTV which is Enhanced Definition. I've already explained what this TV is and what HD Ready and Full HD means - you're talking rubbish. 720p and 1080i are resolutions. HD Ready means that the TV can accept an HD input signal, so 1080p is also HD Ready.



Granted, i meant 480p not 420, but you you have said about 1080p being HD Ready is Rubbish, you dont know what you are talking about.

Adnan786;8858966

Granted, i meant 480p not 420, but you you have said about 1080p being HD … Granted, i meant 480p not 420, but you you have said about 1080p being HD Ready is Rubbish, you dont know what you are talking about.



I know exactly what I'm talking about thank you. HD Ready means that the TV is, for the THIRD TIME NOW, capable of displaying an HD signal. To elaborate further, there are two types of HD Ready TV. One is HD Ready standard, one is HD Ready (1080p) - which the OP CLEARLY states that this TV is - "* 47 inch HD-Ready 1080p with built in Freeview" So yes, 1080p is HD Ready. The requirement is that it has a MINIMUM resolution of 720p - so are you trying to tell me that a 480p TV is HD Ready and a 1080p is not? Who doesn't know what they're talking about?

How long have you worked in the AV industry for? Granted, I've only done two years, but it's long enough to know not to post such ill-informed crap as you are. Regardless of whether you meant 480p or 420p, if you had even the slightest idea what YOU'RE talking about, you'd have known that 480p is not HD Ready or any type of HD at all. Do some research before you call others out on their lack of knowledge, especially when you're talking out of your backside.

Go and read this sony.co.uk/art…056 if you doubt me. I can provide evidence to back up my argument, can you?

Banned

morocco1;8859619

I know exactly what I'm talking about thank you. HD Ready means that the … I know exactly what I'm talking about thank you. HD Ready means that the TV is, for the THIRD TIME NOW, capable of displaying an HD signal. To elaborate further, there are two types of HD Ready TV. One is HD Ready standard, one is HD Ready (1080p) - which the OP CLEARLY states that this TV is - "* 47 inch HD-Ready 1080p with built in Freeview" So yes, 1080p is HD Ready. The requirement is that it has a MINIMUM resolution of 720p - so are you trying to tell me that a 480p TV is HD Ready and a 1080p is not? Who doesn't know what they're talking about?How long have you worked in the AV industry for? Granted, I've only done two years, but it's long enough to know not to post such ill-informed crap as you are. Regardless of whether you meant 480p or 420p, if you had even the slightest idea what YOU'RE talking about, you'd have known that 480p is not HD Ready or any type of HD at all. Do some research before you call others out on their lack of knowledge, especially when you're talking out of your backside.Go and read this http://www.sony.co.uk/article/id/1207064684056 if you doubt me. I can provide evidence to back up my argument, can you?



Have you ever seen a tv being advertised as both Full HD & HD Ready? Neither have i. With the exception of this one ofcourse & perhaps where ever u work. Look on any websites, go to any store, its either listed as one or the other. Full hd tv's will be more expensive then the ones that are the same brand/screen size but labelled as HD Ready.

squidoo.com/Ful…DTV


"For HD Ready HDTVs which have screen resolution less than 1920x1080, they are less than ideal. This is because if you feed a 1080i/1080p signal to a HD Ready HDTV, this HDTV will scale down the signal resolution to fit its smaller screen resolution. That is to say, you will lose resolution if you use a HD Ready HDTV to display a 1080i/1080p signal.

For Full HD HDTVs, they have screen resolution of 1920x1080, thus, when a 1080i or 1080p signal is feed to it, it is able to display the picture in its full glory at 1920x1080 with no resolution loss
."

gadgets.softpedia.com/new…tml

"1080p and 720p (or Full HD and HD-ready, as they're generally presented by the manufacturers) are related to the number of horizontal lines displayed by a TV set (720 or 1080, respectively), as well as the way they are displayed (progressive, which means that all of the lines that form a certain frame are drawn in sequence)."

HD Ready is a minimum standard: the set must have....

1) more than 720 pixels vertical, - that's why 1024*768 is HD Ready, despite having 15% fewer pixels than 720p (1280*720).
2) support HDCP
3) have an HD capable analogue port (component ycbcr)
4) have an HD capable digital port
5) accept 720p/1080i input resolutions.


All 1080p sets are thus HD Ready (could dump the analogue port in future if other standards allow).

With regards to this set, they probably meant to call it "1080p HD Ready", which is the newer label.


Edit: this is the European standard btw, the US versions are a bit less demanding.

morocco1;8852163

1080p and 720p are both classified as HD Ready. HD Ready does NOT … 1080p and 720p are both classified as HD Ready. HD Ready does NOT indicate the resolution of the screen it merely indicates that is is able to show an HD-input signal straight out of the box. The most early LCD and Plasma TVs did not have the resolution to show an HD signal, believe it or not.Only 1080p is FULL HD. If a TV has a resolution of 1920 x 1080 it is always full HD. Does that clear things up?By the way, in my opinion you are better off buying a 50" Plasma if you're going to spend £600 on a TV. There are some good ones about, some of which featured on this very forum recently (can't be bothered to search for one right now). Reason being, the larger an LCD panel, the larger the backlight needs to be. The larger the light, the more light it produces, leading to a greater degree of colour washout. Plasma TVs do not suffer from this problem and are a much better choice at this size - take a trip into Currys and compare a 50" LCD to a 50" Plasma and you'll see. Don't believe the stupid internet rumours about screen-burn, you have to be a complete idiot to burn a modern plasma, like leaving a DVD paused for a few hours.



HD Ready does indicate a resolution. The EICTA standards mandates a minimum of 720P for HD Ready ratification. However, a minimum of 720P is still not enough for the HD Ready logo to be used. There are other conditions of which the most fundamental is HDCP decoding.

Full HD is a misnomer that was concocted by the manufacturers. There is no industry standard definition for Full HD so however it is defined by anybody will be correct or incorrect - it's a subjective definition.

HD Ready 1080P is a different kettle of fish. This is standardised by EICTA. HD Ready 1080P is a superset of HD Ready with the most notable extended feature being that it must support 1080P resolution with 1:1 pixel mapping.

Adnan786;8860515

Have you ever seen a tv being advertised as both Full HD & HD Ready? … Have you ever seen a tv being advertised as both Full HD & HD Ready? Neither have i. With the exception of this one ofcourse & perhaps where ever u work. Look on any websites, go to any store, its either listed as one or the other. Full hd tv's will be more expensive then the ones that are the same brand/screen size but labelled as HD Ready. http://www.squidoo.com/Full_HD_Ready_HDTV"For HD Ready HDTVs which have screen resolution less than 1920x1080, they are less than ideal. This is because if you feed a 1080i/1080p signal to a HD Ready HDTV, this HDTV will scale down the signal resolution to fit its smaller screen resolution. That is to say, you will lose resolution if you use a HD Ready HDTV to display a 1080i/1080p signal.For Full HD HDTVs, they have screen resolution of 1920x1080, thus, when a 1080i or 1080p signal is feed to it, it is able to display the picture in its full glory at 1920x1080 with no resolution loss."http://gadgets.softpedia.com/news/Choosing-Between-1080p-Full-HD-or-720p-HD-Ready-For-Your-HDTV-1075-01.html"1080p and 720p (or Full HD and HD-ready, as they're generally presented by the manufacturers) are related to the number of horizontal lines displayed by a TV set (720 or 1080, respectively), as well as the way they are displayed (progressive, which means that all of the lines that form a certain frame are drawn in sequence)." - not sure why you're using this quote when it is itself incorrect, see underlined? Do I need to explain it? It should read "1080 or 720, respectively. Of course, if you had even the most basic knowledge about this, you'd have spotted that, but instead you've just further proved your inability to comprehend what you're blathering on about by just blindly copying and pasting rubbish. Stop digging yourself into a hole and quit while you're behind.Do quit ur day job.



Yes, I have seen a TV advertised as full HD and HD ready because as I stated and backed up with hard evidence, you incoherent rambling buffon, there are two standards of HD Ready - HD Ready and HD Ready 1080p, which is clearly stated in the original post. So I see your ignorance stretches to basic tasks such as reading as well as talking intelligently about televisions. Full HD and HD Ready are, for the FOURTH time now, referring to two different aspects of the TV's capabilities, so why would they advertise it as one or the other, when it's both?

I also can't find anywhere that states 480p is HD Ready though (probably because it isn't), as you stated in your original post, a post which has already proved you haven't got the faintest idea what you're spouting off about.

ElliottC;8862048

HD Ready does indicate a resolution. The EICTA standards mandates a … HD Ready does indicate a resolution. The EICTA standards mandates a minimum of 720P for HD Ready ratification. However, a minimum of 720P is still not enough for the HD Ready logo to be used. There are other conditions of which the most fundamental is HDCP decoding.Full HD is a misnomer that was concocted by the manufacturers. There is no industry standard definition for Full HD so however it is defined by anybody will be correct or incorrect - it's a subjective definition.HD Ready 1080P is a different kettle of fish. This is standardised by EICTA. HD Ready 1080P is a superset of HD Ready with the most notable extended feature being that it must support 1080P resolution with 1:1 pixel mapping.



You're absolutely correct about the lack of standardisation however I saw no need to confuse the poor fool anymore than he is already, he's already deluded himself into thinking a 480p TV is capable of showing an HD signal.

But in essence, what you've said confirms what I stated, that 1080p is HD Ready, which the babbling fool above is trying to deny.
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