LG 55UJ750V - 55inch 4K UltraHD HDR Smart LED TV in Silver just £589 with code Co-op Electrical
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LG 55UJ750V - 55inch 4K UltraHD HDR Smart LED TV in Silver just £589 with code Co-op Electrical

21
Found 22nd Nov
From the website: "Advanced Multi HDR with Dolby Vision delivers incredibly lifelike pictures canvassed on an IPS 4K Display.

Ultra Surround and LG Smart TV webOS with Freeview Play controlled via a Magic Remote complete a fantastic television housed in an Aluminium Frame Design

All in all a stylish TV that truly delivers."

Co-Op Electrical is already one of the cheapest places at £649. But if you use code "CP60", you can take the price down to just £589.

Top comments

I have this in the 49 inch version but I'm returning it (for the 2nd time). The first one I got had bad backlight bleed and banding and the replacement one is the same, if not worse. In daylight it isn't too bad, but at night time all the blacks are grey with lights at the bottom which are very distracting.
I have attached a photo which was taken in the dark on a black screen with the mute symbol on it, it gives an idea and may help people make their decision. I may have just had 2 bad sets of course so DYOR.32506100-YYOOd.jpg
21 Comments

Cheers OP. Waiting to pull the trigger on this one. Hoping Currys or AO price match as I will get 10% cash back with my RBS credit card.

I have this in the 49 inch version but I'm returning it (for the 2nd time). The first one I got had bad backlight bleed and banding and the replacement one is the same, if not worse. In daylight it isn't too bad, but at night time all the blacks are grey with lights at the bottom which are very distracting.
I have attached a photo which was taken in the dark on a black screen with the mute symbol on it, it gives an idea and may help people make their decision. I may have just had 2 bad sets of course so DYOR.32506100-YYOOd.jpg

Original Poster

pjboag4 m ago

Cheers OP. Waiting to pull the trigger on this one. Hoping Currys or AO …Cheers OP. Waiting to pull the trigger on this one. Hoping Currys or AO price match as I will get 10% cash back with my RBS credit card.


Currys currently have it at £999 and it's out of stock at AO.com so perhaps not, unfortunately.

Half decent price, but let's be honest - this isn't true 4k, UHD, HDR. Those in the know, will know.

ikskwizituk57 m ago

Half decent price, but let's be honest - this isn't true 4k, UHD, HDR. …Half decent price, but let's be honest - this isn't true 4k, UHD, HDR. Those in the know, will know.


Really? Why not? I've never seen this comment on a TV thread before, thanks for the input!

I hope the 55” is better quality than the 49” ones above. It’s being delivered on Friday

I had the 43" version. Backlight banding was terrible. Dreadful.

Went back.

mattd93810 m ago

I hope the 55” is better quality than the 49” ones above. It’s being deliv …I hope the 55” is better quality than the 49” ones above. It’s being delivered on Friday


I hope so for your sake! It got so offputting, if the whole screen was black for a scene and something bright appeared on a certain part of the screen, huge bands of the screen would light up on that section!

This model is cheaper in store at Costco (Avonmouth possibly nationwide) £541 Inc vat I think

Sorry I meant 43"

Bovrilontoast56 m ago

I hope so for your sake! It got so offputting, if the whole screen was …I hope so for your sake! It got so offputting, if the whole screen was black for a scene and something bright appeared on a certain part of the screen, huge bands of the screen would light up on that section!


What you're seeing is not backlight bleeding or indeed a fault at all.

This is the normal behaviour of how the TV works. This is the TV's local dimming system and is the main technology behind HDR - the backlight brightens behind bright spots on a dark screen (or vice versa) to create more contrast - so the mute icon is more stark against the black screen.

Unfortunately to do local dimming well requires many small dimming zones and that is currently pretty expensive so while it works great on flagship TVs, the entry level implementations like this one ended up lighting up huge sections of screen and are often quite noticeable.

It can be adjusted to be more subtle so the brightness difference is much less visible, or turned off entirely. I believe the setting is called LED Local Dimming in the Picture menu.
Edited by: "EndlessWaves" 22nd Nov

EndlessWaves6 m ago

What you're seeing is not backlight bleeding or indeed a fault at all.This …What you're seeing is not backlight bleeding or indeed a fault at all.This is the normal behaviour of how the TV works. This is the TV's local dimming system and is the main technology behind HDR - the backlight brightens behind bright spots on a dark screen (or vice versa) to create more contrast - so the mute icon is more stark against the black screen.Unfortunately to do local dimming well requires many small dimming zones and that is currently pretty expensive so while it works great on flagship TVs, the entry level implementations like this one ended up lighting up huge sections of screen and are often quite noticeable.It can be adjusted to be more subtle so the brightness difference is much less visible, or turned off entirely. I believe the setting is called LED Local Dimming in the Picture menu.


Thanks for clarifying, they said on the phone it was banding etc but assume you know what you are on about. It simply isn't good enough that a TV costing over £800 at the time does this though, it's horrendous and clearly isn't fit for purpose. You wouldn't buy a car that says it will to do 60mpg but to achieve this you have to turn off the heater, close the air vents and keep the wipers off! A TV should come out of the box and work first time, not need a million settings adjustments. The average person wants a TV to show the best possible picture for all scenarios yet they come out and need a complete calibration.

Mine had definite banding. Clear vertical bands visible on horizontal panning shots.
Once you've noticed it.. it's all you can see.

Bovrilontoast31 m ago

You wouldn't buy a car that says it will to do 60mpg but to achieve this …You wouldn't buy a car that says it will to do 60mpg but to achieve this you have to turn off the heater, close the air vents and keep the wipers off!


Most people do these days, and those few manufacturers like Subaru who have stuck to genuine MPG figures have even been criticised because it raises the tax! (It's legally required to display fuel economy figures calculated directly from the emissions test results, which also determined tax until a year or so ago).

I'm sure LG considered what the out of the box settings should be, it's always going to be a trade-off between looking impressive in a shop to actually sell the TV in the first place without incurring necessary returns or damaging word of mouth reputation.

It is a bit surprising they chose high as the default, but are you say it's much less noticeable in the most common viewing environment and I guess it saves more energy (Energy efficiency labels are measured using out of the box settings, and they also influence sales).

ikskwizituk5 h, 14 m ago

Half decent price, but let's be honest - this isn't true 4k, UHD, HDR. …Half decent price, but let's be honest - this isn't true 4k, UHD, HDR. Those in the know, will know.


I'd also like to know what you mean? I don't know much about this subject.

scottm852 h, 21 m ago

I'd also like to know what you mean? I don't know much about this subject.


HDR is an new set of picture standards that allow content to specify colours and levels of contrast that's previous been impossible.

However, they're very ambitious and the hardware to reproduce the full range doesn't exist. Currently the situation is that the higher up the range you go the more improvement you see from HDR content compared to the same content on an SDR TV.

The bottom of the range TVs that claim HDR don't have any new hardware, they're just displaying the HDR content mapped to SDR colour and contrast (brightness) ranges.

Some people like to define a 'real' HDR level where the effect becomes pronounced enough to make a significant difference but as it's a continuous range the actual level varies between people. Some like the UHD Premium spec, others go for an effective local dimming system like the Sony XE90's that offers the first visible increase in contrast in non-colourful scenes.


Generally the thrust of the idea is that HDR on TVs at this price adds a decent amount of value to a purchase for other reasons, but it's premature to upgrade primarily for HDR unless you spend more.

John Lewis had price matched for me. Reading the comments is this a bad buy?



Follow this guide, I picked up the 49" model on Sunday for 499 from Coop, this will make the world of difference

Can anyone confirm this? I just tried with coffee CP60 and it didn't recognize it

only 60hz .. cold

Great price but out of stock.
I already prefer from JL@£640 after a price match and it comes with 5 year warranty.
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