LIDL 1kg FIRE EXTINGUISHER £7.99  from Thurs 9th
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LIDL 1kg FIRE EXTINGUISHER £7.99 from Thurs 9th

49
LocalFound 7th Feb 2012
1 Kg ABC Fire Extinguisher for most common types of fire, Powder type suitable for home,car,caravan, lightweight aluminium includes mounting bracket and easy to read pressure gauge
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i'll buy a couple today!
COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.

Should I put the fire out myself?
Think safety first. Do NOT attempt to tackle a fire if you cannot do so safely. Otherwise get out and call for help closing the doors as you leave to help stop it spreading. But remember, if you decide to tackle it yourself instead of dialling 999 and cannot control it, valuable time has been lost.

Edited by: "SouthParkFan" 7th Feb 2012
SouthParkFan

COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.Should I … COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.Should I put the fire out myself?Think safety first. Do NOT attempt to tackle a fire if you cannot do so safely. Otherwise get out and call for help closing the doors as you leave to help stop it spreading. But remember, if you decide to tackle it yourself instead of dialling 999 and cannot control it, valuable time has been lost.



What if it's a relatively small fire douchebag?

You supposed to just run away and let it spread throughout the whole house?
What kind of fires will this put out?
SouthParkFan

COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.Should I … COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.Should I put the fire out myself?Think safety first. Do NOT attempt to tackle a fire if you cannot do so safely. Otherwise get out and call for help closing the doors as you leave to help stop it spreading. But remember, if you decide to tackle it yourself instead of dialling 999 and cannot control it, valuable time has been lost.


heyyyyyy who let the kid out of his bedroom?go to bed boy time to sleep,and don't you play with fire matches ever.......
Edited by: "addjon" 7th Feb 2012
CFC_Mark

What if it's a relatively small fire douchebag?You supposed to just run … What if it's a relatively small fire douchebag?You supposed to just run away and let it spread throughout the whole house?



Fire blanket, wet teatowel, etc. If it's too big to tackle with those, it's too big to be faffing about with an extinguisher when you should be getting out. Not to mention most people won't have a bloody clue how to use one and will fail at putting the fire out, spreading it further or reducing your time to escape.

False sense of security, IMO.
people talk so much crap on here lol
great price
Good for hitting the burglars with

Have some heat on that fire :-)
Is this ok for a chip pan fire
Never pour water over a chip pan fire, it'll take your face off
Must have for some european countries by car? I was looking for one for parents and cheapest I came up with was £11 on flea bay so good deal from me
Chip pan fire -idealy have a fire blanket in the kitchen or wet a towel or t-towel and hiding behind it with your arms and place over burning pan DO NOT MOVE PAN, This fire ext is a first line of defence when a fire breaks out and you would only attack a fire if there was no danger to you or any others, this is good for keeping in your car or caravan or even if you go camping as it could stop a fire if you acted quickly and could even save a life for £8
What about electrical fires? is it good for those
It's too small!
HUKDeLITE

What kind of fires will this put out?


General rule of thumb is that an extinguisher this size will put out a fire the size of a waste paper basket. Any more than that and it's no good. Perfect for car fires though, my wife had her alternator catch fire a few months ago. Luckily we were at home so had access to water but if it had happened in the middle of nowhere this could be the difference between a £20 repair bill for a scrapyard alternator and a written off car.
Never use this on a chemical fire (including chip-pan), unless you literally have no other choice, and the fire services aren't on their way. Even then I'd take a wet rag.

I've seen people squirt these into the engine block after a crash (pointless); and that's all. Not sure what the real value of these kind of extinguishers are beyond as someone said waste paper bin-type fires.

I guess if a human literally gets covered in petrol and set alight it might be useful, but a blanket would be better.
Everyone should really carry one one in their carboot.Might just be enough to stop a engine fire long enough to get someone clear of danger or save your pride and joy maybe. Only costs the same as 5 litres of petrol
Required to carry one if your driving in the EU so good buy.
SouthParkFan

COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.Do NOT … COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.Do NOT attempt to tackle a fire if you cannot do so safely.


You seem to be a little confused... make your mind up, should you try to put the fire out or not?
(clue: the answer is yes, if at all possible).
Tyranicus66

Required to carry one if your driving in the EU so good buy.



That's not true though, is it? I was driving around Europe all summer and I remember checking the requirements and most countries required a warning triangle, first aid kit, high vis vests and light beam deflectors for driving on the other side of the road.

The AA driving requirements by country (Jan 2011)

It probably won't do any harm having one of these but it's not gonna put out anything but a tiny easily extinguished fire. I suppose it might be useful if the fire is in a really awkward spot.
Okay, i'm a firefighter and i'll be buying one of these for my car as it's a great price, so make of that what you want. It'll smother the oxygen supply in a SMALL car fire (most likely an engine bay fire). It MAY not put it out depending on the size of the fire, but it's better than nothing. FYI, a fire appliance would turn up and use onboard foam, but on a fire the size that this is designed to deal with powder would work about as well as foam extinguisher.

And in response to all the slagging off on both sides by people who AREN'T professionals like myself, if you have the correct equipment, KNOW IT'S USES CORRECTLY AND HOW TO USE IT, and feel confident enough to deal with SMALL fires, then it's your decision. If for a second you DON'T know what you're doing or just as importantly WHAT your doing, then call 999 and get out. Houses can be rebuilt, you can't!

Also, personally I wouldn't bother with fire blankets, they're not as great as everyone thinks. For a chip pan fire a DAMP towel is better, NEVER use a WET towel, it'll take your face off!!! And make sure you know or you've been taught how to wrap it correctly round your hands if you are happy to do it, otherwise you'll burn them, i'll almost guarantee that!! Again, 999 is there for a reason.

Don't try being a hero if you don't know what you're doing!

CFC_Mark: in my career i've seen plenty of people who've been disfigured and/or lost a lot more than property because of gungho attitudes from people who think they know better, so don't start suggesting that anyone who doesn't feel happy about tackling a fire or more importantly gives advice erring on the side of caution and the preservation of life over property is a douchebag! You obviously have no idea of what you speak of! Define 'relatively small fire'?! What is small to you is big to someone else, and bearing in mind what I do for a living means that what you consider big would probably be small to me!

Edited by: "blackspaven" 7th Feb 2012
UnoriginalGuy

Never use this on a chemical fire (including chip-pan), unless you … Never use this on a chemical fire (including chip-pan), unless you literally have no other choice, and the fire services aren't on their way. Even then I'd take a wet rag. I've seen people squirt these into the engine block after a crash (pointless); and that's all. Not sure what the real value of these kind of extinguishers are beyond as someone said waste paper bin-type fires. I guess if a human literally gets covered in petrol and set alight it might be useful, but a blanket would be better.



Sweet Jebus, do NOT use a wet rag on a chip pan fire!!!!! oO

If you wanna put out a developed engine fire, you'll need a LOT more than 1kg, ubt it's better than nothing and may buy you some time.
SanTokiMTB

You seem to be a little confused... make your mind up, should you try to … You seem to be a little confused... make your mind up, should you try to put the fire out or not?(clue: the answer is yes, if at all possible).



No, the answer is, yes if you know what you're doing, not just if it's possible. You can do a LOT worse by trying to fight a fire with bad knowledge.
sparky1953

Chip pan fire -idealy have a fire blanket in the kitchen or wet a towel … Chip pan fire -idealy have a fire blanket in the kitchen or wet a towel or t-towel and hiding behind it with your arms and place over burning pan DO NOT MOVE PAN, This fire ext is a first line of defence when a fire breaks out and you would only attack a fire if there was no danger to you or any others, this is good for keeping in your car or caravan or even if you go camping as it could stop a fire if you acted quickly and could even save a life for £8



Again, do NOT use a wet tea towel, a very wrung out, DAMP one. Big difference! It's better than a fire blanket anyway. Technically, you can only use a fire blanket once before it's integrity is compromised, and if they've been in the box for a while they're not as flexible with age. You're supposed to check it at least once a year, but people never do, let alone know the safe way to use one of these..

I have a powder 1kg extinguisher in my kitchen for that reason though.
hooray henry

Might just be enough to stop a engine fire long enough to get someone … Might just be enough to stop a engine fire long enough to get someone clear of danger or save your pride and joy maybe.



Who cares if my car burns to death, thats what insurance is for.
Get urself a Wet Chem, ABF foam or one of the new Dry Mist Water extinguishers if you're worried about chip pan fires and don't want to get close enough to chuck a blanket/damp towel over it. Powder is a messy way of dealing with fire but it is the most versatile. In my house i have a couple of 3ltr foams to tackle anything i need to tackle and an ABF foam in the kitchen just in case.

When it comes to safety cheap doesn't always equal good! But heat added for the price.
this is in my local lidl already.
Picked one of these up for the kitchen, might get another for my car, good stuff
HUKDeLITE

What about electrical fires? is it good for those



whats the avatar from HUKDeLITE?!
more and more popping up, but what is the picture from?!
SouthParkFan

COLD - You should always leave fire fighting to the profesionals.



What if you call out the fire brigade when it's a small fire which could have been tackled yourself, and this means they are later getting to a real emergency and someone's life is lost?
Ok someone must see the irony of this deal going hot lol
shakennstirred

people talk so much crap on here lol



I believe it's a prerequisite to signing up for membership and it's definitely in the HUKD terms and conditions... didn't you read them...


Edited by: "southwell65" 8th Feb 2012
gwapenut

What if you call out the fire brigade when it's a small fire which could … What if you call out the fire brigade when it's a small fire which could have been tackled yourself, and this means they are later getting to a real emergency and someone's life is lost?



We don't mind, and it's very, very wrong of you to put that moral pressure on someone if they're not happy with dealing with it!! Would you say the same to a 90 year old arthritic in a wheelchair?!

Have a word with yourself.
+1 to not bothering with this, my fire marshall course at work (run by the local fire brigade) taught me that the best course of action is to leave, closing all doors behind you, and to call 999. I've seen powder in action, and its messy - may as well give up the one room to smoke or fire damage rather than several rooms to powder. As said previously, the presence of a fire extinguisher can provide a false sense of security empowering people to think they can fight a fire. The best thing is lots of smoke alarms so you have an early warning and can get out.
xfield

+1 to not bothering with this, my fire marshall course at work (run by … +1 to not bothering with this, my fire marshall course at work (run by the local fire brigade) taught me that the best course of action is to leave, closing all doors behind you, and to call 999. I've seen powder in action, and its messy - may as well give up the one room to smoke or fire damage rather than several rooms to powder. As said previously, the presence of a fire extinguisher can provide a false sense of security empowering people to think they can fight a fire. The best thing is lots of smoke alarms so you have an early warning and can get out.



Sensible attitude. It's whatever you're comfortable with. Personally, I'd have no problem assessing if I can fight even a larger fire or not with what i've got in the house/car, but then again i've got a mahoosive wealth of knowledge in that particular field to make me more confident to do it than the average joe.

If you're not sure, get the blinkin' flip out!!

And yes, it IS messy, but unless you're planning on spraying it all over the shop instead of correctly aiming it at the fire, there's no reason it shouldn't be containable to one room, let alone just the seat of fire. Experience will tell, but I use them quite a lot and i've never made THAT much of a mess. All fire extinguishers are a bit messy because of the way they spray, with the exception of CO2, but that's a gas designed to inhibit the oxygen supply so if you're in a small room when you set that off, you won't be able to breathe if you use it too much: it's what they use to flood computer server rooms. Extinguishers can be dangerous things if you don't know how to use them, or even worse, what's in them!

Edited by: "blackspaven" 8th Feb 2012
phil001

whats the avatar from HUKDeLITE?!more and more popping up, but what is … whats the avatar from HUKDeLITE?!more and more popping up, but what is the picture from?!



From our Leader

His name is M
HUKDeLITE

From our LeaderHis name is M



lol

grrr
blackspaven

We don't mind, and it's very, very wrong of you to put that moral … We don't mind, and it's very, very wrong of you to put that moral pressure on someone if they're not happy with dealing with it!! Would you say the same to a 90 year old arthritic in a wheelchair?!Have a word with yourself.



I'd get it in context if I were you. I was responding to the "You should **always** leave fire fighting to the profesionals"

You seem to believe that I wrote "you should ALWAYS tackle fires yourselves". Please don't put words in my mouth, it's not constructive.
No, it's not out of context because any member of the Fire Service will tell you to ALWAYS leave firefighting to the professionals, regardless of how big or small because what's small for one person is big to another! We can't DEMAND that people do it though, which is why these sort of products are sold, for those who are comfortable with the situation. Don't jump in if you don't know the practices of the people who do the job. The first poster was correct; all you're doing is putting a moral dilemma into the minds of those who will then feel guilty about calling us out! If you DO feel comfortable about tackling it, then that's your call, nobody else's, but the second you don't, then that's what we're here for and we would always advise to call us out, for your protection.

If someone feels uneasy about fighting a fire, NOBODY should be guilting them into calling us out, that's a terrible message to send out!!!

"What if you call out the fire brigade when it's a small fire"

Again, tell me what a 'small fire' is and i'll find you someone who's uncomfortable with dealing with it. What you wrote is a lot less constructive than anything i've written. The OP & I err on the side of caution, you've questioned someone into feeling guilty about calling their local Fire Service out.

I'd not comment or give 'advice' on how to do a dangerous act/job you obviously don't know much about... if I were you.


Edited by: "blackspaven" 8th Feb 2012
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