Lidl silvercrest Bread Maker £34.99 - Available from 4th September
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Lidl silvercrest Bread Maker £34.99 - Available from 4th September

£34.99LIDL Deals
36
Found 28th Aug 2014
Fully automated program cycles for mixing, kneading raising and baking loaves up to 1.25kg
With 12 programs, including gluten-free baking, pasta dough or jam programs and 3 browning levels
15-hour delay timer, 60-minute keep-warm function and status light
Includes recipe book, measuring cup, measuring spoon and dough hook remover
3 year manufacturer's warranty

36 Comments

hopefully this latest Silvercrest offering still has twin dough hook paddles which guarantees a better knead and a more rectangular tin
The longer bread tin allows a long loaf as the aforementioned dough hooks can cover all areas of a rectangular tin.
A single dough hook would not be able to sweep the extreme corners of a rectangular bread tin
Finally a "traditional" long loaf is aesthetically pleasing compared to a square loaf that most domestic breadmakers churn out.
win win win
p.s the closest trad loaf twinpaddle breadmaker is the Breviille twin paddle which is almost twice as expensive

It does not look like they have changed the design from the one we bought some 2-3 years ago, that was twin paddle, Lidl's own premixed bread mixes work very well in these machines, from memory they do a ciabatta, farmhouse and wholemeal loaf mix.

Decent machine, still pleased with ours, still working great.

Not used it for jam making or any other modes, I have read before (and not just a problem with this model) that jam making in bread machines does not work well at all. Use it for what its best for, dough kneeding and baking bread.
Edited by: "cicobuff" 28th Aug 2014

Good machines these, still have our one from about 3 or more years ago, used often enough. Still a good price considering we paid £29 odd for it.

I tried jam making in a different bread maker i had. Followed the instructions and all that happened was the sugar/fruit boiled up and over the tin and down onto the heating elements. This gave off a terrible white smoke, horrible smell and a black mess inside the machine.

One disadvantage of a twin paddle machine is that this will leave two holes in the bottom of the bread when the bread is removed, rather than one. A friend who had a twin paddle machine was annoyed enough about this they decided not to get another twin paddle when they replaced it.

My machine has a single paddle and, although I can't compare it to a twin paddle as I've never had one, the bread is very nice!

how long does it take to make the bread?

cicobuff

It does not look like they have changed the design from the one we bought … It does not look like they have changed the design from the one we bought some 2-3 years ago, that was twin paddle, Lidl's own premixed bread mixes work very well in these machines, from memory they do a ciabatta, farmhouse and wholemeal loaf mix.Decent machine, still pleased with ours, still working great.Not used it for jam making or any other modes, I have read before (and not just a problem with this model) that jam making in bread machines does not work well at all. Use it for what its best for, dough kneeding and baking bread.



Do you find Lidl bread mixes to be generally reliable? I used one in a Panasonic machine about 2 years back and the result looked like a transporter accident from Star Trek, despite normally having 100% success with mixes.

I thought about giving them another try, but am rather loathe to do so after the last experience.

spock1958

Do you find Lidl bread mixes to be generally reliable? I used one in a … Do you find Lidl bread mixes to be generally reliable? I used one in a Panasonic machine about 2 years back and the result looked like a transporter accident from Star Trek, despite normally having 100% success with mixes.I thought about giving them another try, but am rather loathe to do so after the last experience.



Never had a problem myself following the instructions, as long as the tin size is the same in your panasonic cannot understand why the results would be different in anything other than a Silvercrest (Lidl) machine either. Apart from the ciabatta ones where you add a dash of olive oil its just the usual tepid water and bread mix.
Edited by: "cicobuff" 29th Aug 2014

I don't like the shape of these "controls at the front" machines. Panasonic has also changed the format. The old one fits in a wall cupboard and can be opened on a worktop below a wall cupboard. The new one does neither.

love the smell of fresh bread in the morning. must get one

K0YS

how long does it take to make the bread?



From memory 2 to 3 hrs. They have a quick bake mode but I think the longer the better/more rise more flavour.

Does anyone know the power consumption / cost for making a loaf in one of these?

adamguest1985

Does anyone know the power consumption / cost for making a loaf in one of … Does anyone know the power consumption / cost for making a loaf in one of these?


Pretty minimal - the heater on the Panasonic (this will be similar) is 500W and apart from during the baking phase is on very little indeed. Even during the baking phase (45 mins) it's only on maybe 50% of the time once up to temperature. I'd guess 5p max.

pibpob

Pretty minimal - the heater on the Panasonic (this will be similar) is … Pretty minimal - the heater on the Panasonic (this will be similar) is 500W and apart from during the baking phase is on very little indeed. Even during the baking phase (45 mins) it's only on maybe 50% of the time once up to temperature. I'd guess 5p max.


Heard 5p quoted a few times and is born out by my experience....

I will be buying one thanks

Original Poster

There's a video, manuals and full specs for a silvercrest bread maker here:- lidl-service.com/cps…ker

This one will probably be the same, or virtually identical.
Edited by: "melted" 29th Aug 2014

Cheers

Thanks both!

patg2005

Heard 5p quoted a few times and is born out by my experience....

We got the Delta breadmaker from Aldi when it was on offer a couple of months ago at the same price as this one (it's only a single paddle one though).
The missus was sceptical, but after a couple of uses we were converted - delicious bread of all varieties costing about 25p a loaf (that includes the ingredients and electricity used).
Get one - you won't regret it!

I think I'm going to make the leap to a bread maker, can someone please tell me what bits are needed

Bread flour (??)
Yeast (is there a type?)
And then just adding water, butter (salted, unsalted? Does it matter what type) salt (table salt ok?)

Or just buy complete bread packs?

Thanks in advance

Try a net search - there is loads of stuff about bread makers out there.

spock1958

I used one in a Panasonic machine about 2 years back and the result … I used one in a Panasonic machine about 2 years back and the result looked like a transporter accident from Star Trek, despite normally having 100% success with mixes.



oO

jan81

One disadvantage of a twin paddle machine is that this will leave two … One disadvantage of a twin paddle machine is that this will leave two holes in the bottom of the bread when the bread is removed, rather than one.



true true. I do prefer a long loaf though.
I've heard of some folk ( to minimise the size of the holes) removing the hooks after the final knead and before the final rise and bake
On some Kenwood machines the baking process is fan-assisted , also the paddle folds down after the final knead which apparently helps in producing a perfect loaf.
I can't personally comment as I abandoned a Kenwood I almost bought off gumtree after being led round the houses

dealzilla

I think I'm going to make the leap to a bread maker, can someone please … I think I'm going to make the leap to a bread maker, can someone please tell me what bits are needed Bread flour (??)Yeast (is there a type?)And then just adding water, butter (salted, unsalted? Does it matter what type) salt (table salt ok?)Or just buy complete bread packs? Thanks in advance


The breadmaker you buy will give loads of recipes for different mixes.
Yeast is usually Hovis or Allinson in small sachets, which will make around 4/5 loaves.

Pre mixes are useful to have a couple of in stock as they always use the short bake (approx 2 hours) so are quick, but cost at least double the price of using separate ingredients, which only takes around 2 minutes anyway.
Edited by: "spock1958" 3rd Sep 2014

Original Poster

Picked one up earlier today.

darklight

hopefully this latest Silvercrest offering still has twin dough hook … hopefully this latest Silvercrest offering still has twin dough hook paddles which guarantees a better knead and a more rectangular tin



It does have twin dough hooks, it is the version I've linked to below, but can't see any obvious differences to the model I posted a link to previously.

lidl-service.com/cps…t=1


Edited by: "melted" 4th Sep 2014

darklight

hopefully this latest Silvercrest offering still has twin dough hook … hopefully this latest Silvercrest offering still has twin dough hook paddles which guarantees a better knead and a more rectangular tin


Well it presumably guarantees a better knead in a rectangular tin. If you're happy with the squarer loaves then a single paddle is all that's necessary.

Thank you picked up mine today

Original Poster

pibpob

Pretty minimal - the heater on the Panasonic (this will be similar) is … Pretty minimal - the heater on the Panasonic (this will be similar) is 500W and apart from during the baking phase is on very little indeed. Even during the baking phase (45 mins) it's only on maybe 50% of the time once up to temperature. I'd guess 5p max.




I measured mine with one of those plug in power monitor things. It used about 1/3 of a unit (0.32Kw/h) to do a 750g loaf on programme 2.

melted

I measured mine with one of those plug in power monitor things. It used … I measured mine with one of those plug in power monitor things. It used about 1/3 of a unit (0.32Kw/h) to do a 750g loaf on programme 2.


Great - sounds about right. It might over-read a bit due to the reactive load when heater and motor are off. Did you see what the minimum reading of power meter was?

Original Poster

Minimum reading was zero, with a power factor of 1. The power used by the micro-controller while it was idle waiting for the dough to rise and whatever, wasn't enough for it to register. The motor drew between about 100- 120 watt while kneading. Think the element was somewhere in the region of 700w.

Its a cheap monitor, no idea how accurate it is other than I'd checked the mains voltage it reports was correct by my meter when I got it, because it was 20V less than it used to be.

Original Poster

Anyone else getting rings of powdered metal in the base of the breadmaker around the rotating metal drive fingers that drive the paddle spindles?

The edges of the steel fingers on mine have ground themselves away forming hooks, so I had a great deal of trouble removing the bread tub after it finished cooking the last loaf.

I'm wondering if it is a design fault, or if I've got a dud.


Edited by: "melted" 23rd Sep 2014

Tip: it's a bread maker, not a cement mixer.

Original Poster

pibpob

Tip: it's a bread maker, not a cement mixer.



Never had that problem with my cement mixer, but the loaves would be far too big and a bit gritty.

Anyway, it's gone back, but I was wondering if I got another, was it likely to have the same fault. However, they were all sold anyway.

Original Poster

I noticed a very small amount of metal powder the first time I used it, so if you've used it a few times and not had that problem it will most likely be fine. Doing a white loaf on the "french bread" programme 2 seemed to cause the most wear of the recipes I tried, probably because it was a dryer, stiffer dough.

When I first saw it I wrongly figured it was probably the bottom of the aluminium tub getting scratched by the metal fingers - should have tried a magnet on the dust. I think what actually was happening is the edges of the 'U' shaped bits of steel fixed to the bottom of the tub spindles were grinding against the edges of the drive fingers as the bread tub was bumped around in its mounting.

I took a picture so I didn't need to unpack it to show them when I took it back.:-

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-wju6gGHpVzY/VCRYpM1XO3I/AAAAAAAAAds/a6Z3w3cLr6U/s800/P1010399.JPG






Edited by: "melted" 25th Sep 2014

melted

I noticed a very small amount of metal powder the first time I used it, … I noticed a very small amount of metal powder the first time I used it, so if you've used it a few times and not had that problem it will most likely be fine. Doing a white loaf on the "french bread" programme 2 seemed to cause the most wear of the recipes I tried, probably because it was a dryer, stiffer dough.When I first saw it I wrongly figured it was probably the bottom of the aluminium tub getting scratched by the metal fingers - should have tried a magnet on the dust. I think what actually was happening is the edges of the 'U' shaped bits of steel fixed to the bottom of the tub spindles were grinding against the edges of the drive fingers as the bread tub was bumped around in its mounting. I took a picture so I didn't need to unpack it to show them when I took it back.:-


Mine has done that a little bit(didn't realise that is what you meant) not really that worried till you pointed it out
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