Life Saver Carbon Monoxide Alarm - £9.95 (Prime) (+£4.49 Non Prime) @ Amazon
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Life Saver Carbon Monoxide Alarm - £9.95 (Prime) (+£4.49 Non Prime) @ Amazon

£9.95£11.9917%Amazon Deals
17
Posted 25th MayEdited by:"apur32"
Price @ Argos £20

The Lifesaver Carbon Monoxide Alarm continuously monitors for the presence of deadly Carbon Monoxide (CO) in the home, providing a constant protection against the effects of this deadly gas.

The Lifesaver 5CO features a 7 year sensor life with an end of life warning to replace the unit after seven years protection.

  • Continuous monitoring
  • End-of-life alarm
  • Test/reset button
  • Battery operation
  • Multi-function green and red LED's
  • 7 Year sensor life
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joebuckton25/05/2019 14:13

We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas …We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas engineer and we get tested on this exact point every test/retest. The rule is, read the instructions!! Put it where it tells you.


Lucky this isn't a Carbon Dioxide detector then.

craigstephens25/05/2019 11:23

Comment deleted


We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas engineer and we get tested on this exact point every test/retest.

The rule is, read the instructions!! Put it where it tells you.
Edited by: "joebuckton" 25th May
17 Comments
Thanks, OP! Great price, and absolutely endorse that every home should have one!!
Apparently, it should be located at head height, rather than on the ceiling, as Carbon Monoxide is heavier than air.
craigstephens25/05/2019 11:23

Comment deleted


We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas engineer and we get tested on this exact point every test/retest.

The rule is, read the instructions!! Put it where it tells you.
Edited by: "joebuckton" 25th May
joebuckton25/05/2019 14:13

We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas …We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas engineer and we get tested on this exact point every test/retest. The rule is, read the instructions!! Put it where it tells you.


Lucky this isn't a Carbon Dioxide detector then.

joebuckton25/05/2019 14:13

We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas …We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas engineer and we get tested on this exact point every test/retest. The rule is, read the instructions!! Put it where it tells you.


CO = 12 + 16 = 28
O2 = 16 + 16 = 32
N2 = 14 + 14 = 28
CO2 = 12 + 16 + 16 = 44
H2O (Steam) = 1 + 1 + 16 = 18
O3 (ozone) = 16 + 16 + 16 = 48

so expect steam to rise, CO2 and ozone to fall and the rest to mix more or less. If you don't know this stuff, I can't trust you as a gas engineer.
somebody should test one by putting it near the car exhaust to see if it really does detect CO, don't want to take chances with this terrible gas.
joebuckton25/05/2019 14:13

We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas …We have this same argument every time a CO2 detector is posted. I'm a gas engineer and we get tested on this exact point every test/retest. The rule is, read the instructions!! Put it where it tells you.


I don't think you a confusing this with another gas that we breath safely. good luck next year with your next retest. Wouldn't want you testing my appliance for CO2 leaks, they would all fail!

Hot deal but now expired £10.58 now
Edited by: "HerefordCiderApples" 25th May
amb47uk25/05/2019 19:40

Comment deleted



So sorry for your loss, that's a terrible thing to happen. My heart goes out to you and your family xxx
Also a gas engineer. Ultimately it's a case of assessing each prem and following MI's to determine best position for the detector to be positioned.

Alot of crap talk among members judging behaviour of gases (purely based on a static air pressure in lab conditions) when other factors are at work in houses (e.g. ventilation locations,extractor fans, natural draughts/adventitious ventilation etc etc).


Long story short. If you have any flame based appliance then get yourself a CO detector in the room of the appliance as a bare minimum.

Ideally locate on on every room/corridor that the flue/chimney passes through (and if flue terminates near an opening such as window or vent add one into the space there too).

Hobs are often overlooked but I have dealt with a surprising amount of CO incidents which have been caused by gas hobs. Usually down to oversized pans being used limiting oxygen supply to the burners.

Long story short. Get one for every appliance/room that's at risk.

If you don't have any combustion based appliances,but your neighbours do, then you could still be at risk. So I'd recommend having one anyway. As again had a few incidents over the years where this has been the case.
I get one free every 5 or so years from my housing association. Thankfully it's never gone off outside testing.
Bestbitter25/05/2019 10:21

Thanks, OP! Great price, and absolutely endorse that every home should …Thanks, OP! Great price, and absolutely endorse that every home should have one!! Apparently, it should be located at head height, rather than on the ceiling, as Carbon Monoxide is heavier than air.



I wouldn’t say every home, only if it has combustible appliances
Does anyone out there know how effective this specific unit is? It seems that all the comments are directed toward CO detectors, but nothing really about how good this one is? I'm looking at getting some fire my ageing parents
HerefordCiderApples25/05/2019 15:25

I don't think you a confusing this with another gas that we breath safely. …I don't think you a confusing this with another gas that we breath safely. good luck next year with your next retest. Wouldn't want you testing my appliance for CO2 leaks, they would all fail!Hot deal but now expired £10.58 now


whoops. In a rush.
It doesn't let me edit it either for some reason.
Edited by: "joebuckton" 26th May
xavierseb125/05/2019 15:09

CO = 12 + 16 = 28O2 = 16 + 16 = 32N2 = 14 + 14 = 28CO2 = 12 + 16 + 16 = …CO = 12 + 16 = 28O2 = 16 + 16 = 32N2 = 14 + 14 = 28CO2 = 12 + 16 + 16 = 44H2O (Steam) = 1 + 1 + 16 = 18O3 (ozone) = 16 + 16 + 16 = 48so expect steam to rise, CO2 and ozone to fall and the rest to mix more or less. If you don't know this stuff, I can't trust you as a gas engineer.


I incorrectly called it a CO2 detector not CO. It won't let me edit my post.
£10.60 each now
Bought a caravan with one of these (or at least looks the same) the other week. Was told by the dealer it would be best to move it from just above head height at the entrance to the window sill a few feet from the floor level as "if you leave it above head height and there's CO it'll be too late when it's detected" so it now sits behind the TV on the window sill.
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