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Limited Time Deal! 210 Piece First Aid Kit - Sold by General Medika / Fulfilled by Amazon - £16.95 Prime (+£4.49 non-Prime)
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Limited Time Deal! 210 Piece First Aid Kit - Sold by General Medika / Fulfilled by Amazon - £16.95 Prime (+£4.49 non-Prime)

£16.95£28.9942%Amazon Deals
32
Posted 6th Nov
Cheapest I have seen at the moment for a pretty comprehensive first aid kit.
Every home and Vehie should have one!

Limited Time Deal through amazon

210 Piece First Aid Kit- Emergency kit - Reflective Design - Includes Eyewash, Ice(Cold) Pack,Moleskin Pad,CPR Face Mask and Emergency Blanket for Travel, Home, Office, Car, Workplace & Outdoor
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Murgatr0yd06/11/2019 22:54

The majority of the time it’s not. Even if you manage to find a vacant p …The majority of the time it’s not. Even if you manage to find a vacant plot of land that happens to be for sale, has planning permission and water, electrical, road and waste connections, you then have to factor in the cost of this in addition to all the groundworks, foundations and construction costs.On top of this, you will have the costs of any people you need to employ, an architect for starters, unless you happen to be qualified to do this yourself as you will need to build in accordance with Building Regulations for structural, acoustic, fire and thermal performance. Even if you watch the pennies, you’re unlikely to see much change from £100k, not inclusive of the land cost, unless you are doing all the building work yourself (which most people won’t be).If you don’t manage to obtain a plot with all necessary linkages (which is highly likely, as there will be more competition from others with a similar idea, as well as good old developers), then you have the additional costs of sorting all of this yourself, as well as obtaining planning permission, that is if you are successful in obtaining it of course.



Well sod that that ...I'll just buy the kit
32 Comments
Cheaper to buy stuff separately.
anony_mous06/11/2019 22:29

Comment deleted


The majority of the time it’s not. Even if you manage to find a vacant plot of land that happens to be for sale, has planning permission and water, electrical, road and waste connections, you then have to factor in the cost of this in addition to all the groundworks, foundations and construction costs.
On top of this, you will have the costs of any people you need to employ, an architect for starters, unless you happen to be qualified to do this yourself as you will need to build in accordance with Building Regulations for structural, acoustic, fire and thermal performance.
Even if you watch the pennies, you’re unlikely to see much change from £100k, not inclusive of the land cost, unless you are doing all the building work yourself (which most people won’t be).
If you don’t manage to obtain a plot with all necessary linkages (which is highly likely, as there will be more competition from others with a similar idea, as well as good old developers), then you have the additional costs of sorting all of this yourself, as well as obtaining planning permission, that is if you are successful in obtaining it of course.
Edited by: "Murgatr0yd" 6th Nov
Murgatr0yd06/11/2019 22:54

The majority of the time it’s not. Even if you manage to find a vacant p …The majority of the time it’s not. Even if you manage to find a vacant plot of land that happens to be for sale, has planning permission and water, electrical, road and waste connections, you then have to factor in the cost of this in addition to all the groundworks, foundations and construction costs.On top of this, you will have the costs of any people you need to employ, an architect for starters, unless you happen to be qualified to do this yourself as you will need to build in accordance with Building Regulations for structural, acoustic, fire and thermal performance. Even if you watch the pennies, you’re unlikely to see much change from £100k, not inclusive of the land cost, unless you are doing all the building work yourself (which most people won’t be).If you don’t manage to obtain a plot with all necessary linkages (which is highly likely, as there will be more competition from others with a similar idea, as well as good old developers), then you have the additional costs of sorting all of this yourself, as well as obtaining planning permission, that is if you are successful in obtaining it of course.



Well sod that that ...I'll just buy the kit
More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, suturing kit, tourniquet, splints, haemostatic powders... Now that would be a proper first aid kit. Had one made up for my hikes in the north Western Cape & then travelling into Namibia a few years ago by a wilderness medicine mate.
What about a house kit
This thread has gone off on a tangent Am I buying a house? building a house? Climbing a mountain? Shooting up Antibiotics? Or just buying the first aid kit?
Sammy8606/11/2019 23:14

More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, …More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, suturing kit, tourniquet, splints, haemostatic powders... Now that would be a proper first aid kit. Had one made up for my hikes in the north Western Cape & then travelling into Namibia a few years ago by a wilderness medicine mate.


If you don't have the training most of those things are useless. Fluids and suture it's especially not something to carry if not trained.

You shouldn't apply tourniquets if you don't know what you are doing either. Hemostatic powders are expensive and not great value, also not best practice anymore.

If you need to travel with an that you need a trained dedicated medic or you shouldn't be doing it.
uk.camelcamelcamel.com/210…T96


Has been was £16 from Decmeber to August of this year. Went up to 20 and has just gone back to its normal price. Not a hot deal but worth having one in the house.
Having consulted the mysterious camels they say "price not been anywhere near £28.99 for looooooong time".




Edit.... Jim got to the mysterious Camels before me :-)

Agreed - couple of quid off most recent price & worth having one in the house and / or car.



38922288-NKcVH.jpg
Edited by: "Tomb" 7th Nov
Sammy8606/11/2019 23:14

More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, …More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, suturing kit, tourniquet, splints, haemostatic powders... Now that would be a proper first aid kit. Had one made up for my hikes in the north Western Cape & then travelling into Namibia a few years ago by a wilderness medicine mate.




Oh dear, here comes outback 'arry.
smckirdy07/11/2019 00:35

If you don't have the training most of those things are useless. Fluids …If you don't have the training most of those things are useless. Fluids and suture it's especially not something to carry if not trained.You shouldn't apply tourniquets if you don't know what you are doing either. Hemostatic powders are expensive and not great value, also not best practice anymore. If you need to travel with an that you need a trained dedicated medic or you shouldn't be doing it.


Had the training love...

Not exactly rocket surgery.

As I said mate based in Western Cape South Africa.
freyabo07/11/2019 03:43

Oh dear, here comes outback 'arry.


And your input is?

If you don't have anything useful to say...

It would be like me commenting on say loose some weight perhaps, stopping drinking, smoking and/or eating fatty foods as that may reduce symptoms of gord/hiatus hernia instead of taking ppi...
Edited by: "Sammy86" 7th Nov
Sammy8607/11/2019 05:10

Had the training love...Not exactly rocket surgery.As I said mate based in …Had the training love...Not exactly rocket surgery.As I said mate based in Western Cape South Africa.


And how many people on here will have? Training rates for basic first aid in the UK at abysmal.

Given the personal liabilities involved I would treat it more seriously than rocket surgery, which isn't that hard.
smckirdy07/11/2019 07:12

And how many people on here will have? Training rates for basic first aid …And how many people on here will have? Training rates for basic first aid in the UK at abysmal.Given the personal liabilities involved I would treat it more seriously than rocket surgery, which isn't that hard.


Exactly the UK. Where people don't take personal accountability for their health. And fortunately I don't have any obligation to give first aid to anyone.

I can safely say I don't have any impending legal civil cases and when your nearest medical centre is over 500km away, suffice to say it can make all the difference.

Not sure about the surgery isn't hard comment, the personal liabilities are even higher with regulatory and even criminal sequelae, see the David Sellu or Afshar cases.
Sammy8606/11/2019 23:14

More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, …More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, suturing kit, tourniquet, splints, haemostatic powders... Now that would be a proper first aid kit. Had one made up for my hikes in the north Western Cape & then travelling into Namibia a few years ago by a wilderness medicine mate.


And your point is.... this can be had for £16.95 rather than £1695 including the blood????? yes obviously

It is without a doubt a good idea to have a first aid kit and add a few extras like scissors, paracetamol, aspirin, pen/biro, paper, foil blanket if not included and something you like (be it sweets or some strong stuff).You can continue using most items beyond the standard 4 year expiery but still worth replacing every 5 years as the alco-wipes dry out and plasters get less sticky. Over the last 25 years I have found it is cheaper to buy a first aid kit on ebay and use it as a refill.

You can if you look around e bay, find pretty good small kits, ideal for a car, for 99p
I think I previously brought 500-piece item for about £5 and got rid of the bag and just used it as a refill kit

I think this kit is the going price for such a kit, without a doubt it can be found cheaper but you have to look. The bag is quite decent.
JIM1973ANDREWS07/11/2019 02:41

https://uk.camelcamelcamel.com/210-Piece-First-Kit-Emergency/product/B07431BT96Has been was £16 from Decmeber to August of this year. Went up to 20 and has just gone back to its normal price. Not a hot deal but worth having one in the house.


Your link goes to £19.95 ????

It's a hot limited time deal.
OperateOnMe07/11/2019 07:23

And your point is.... this can be had for £16.95 rather than £1695 i …And your point is.... this can be had for £16.95 rather than £1695 including the blood????? yes obviouslyIt is without a doubt a good idea to have a first aid kit and add a few extras like scissors, paracetamol, aspirin, pen/biro, paper, foil blanket if not included and something you like (be it sweets or some strong stuff).You can continue using most items beyond the standard 4 year expiery but still worth replacing every 5 years as the alco-wipes dry out and plasters get less sticky. Over the last 25 years I have found it is cheaper to buy a first aid kit on ebay and use it as a refill.You can if you look around e bay, find pretty good small kits, ideal for a car, for 99p I think I previously brought 500-piece item for about £5 and got rid of the bag and just used it as a refill kitI think this kit is the going price for such a kit, without a doubt it can be found cheaper but you have to look. The bag is quite decent.


So perhaps this is just a basic first aid kit.
Much of the aforementioned can be had for not very much cost.
Key item is a box of gloves.
That would be a go bag from what you describe.
Perhaps even a cheap mobile phone & battery charger in addition to matches/lighter, a mirror, led torch, compass...
Not everybody wants the minor hassle of making up their own first aid kit, so a ready made, clearly marked one is ideal for some. If you do want to do your own:

nhs.uk/com…it/
dAAnnii07/11/2019 08:23

Comment deleted


3 week deliver delay
£5 more expensive
Not incl. Delivery.

Why do ppl keep posting rubbish?
Sammy8606/11/2019 23:14

More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, …More useful is having IV lines, bolus of fluids,, shot of antibiotics, suturing kit, tourniquet, splints, haemostatic powders... Now that would be a proper first aid kit. Had one made up for my hikes in the north Western Cape & then travelling into Namibia a few years ago by a wilderness medicine mate.


Bless, bragging about your travels with an irrelevant post on a decent deal about a medical kit suited to the UK. For the hard of learning its called hotUKdeals
Edited by: "TKDBlackbelt" 7th Nov
Sammy8607/11/2019 07:18

Exactly the UK. Where people don't take personal accountability for their …Exactly the UK. Where people don't take personal accountability for their health. And fortunately I don't have any obligation to give first aid to anyone.I can safely say I don't have any impending legal civil cases and when your nearest medical centre is over 500km away, suffice to say it can make all the difference.Not sure about the surgery isn't hard comment, the personal liabilities are even higher with regulatory and even criminal sequelae, see the David Sellu or Afshar cases.


If course they do, that's what a taxpayer funded heath service is for. There is no need if you don't do high risk activities for work or pleasure to have training in first aid. Its certainly good to have, but not essential. Doing ALS or expeditionary medicine is ott.

Am engineer, can confirm rocket surgery not that hard.
TKDBlackbelt07/11/2019 09:36

Bless, bragging about your travels with an irrelevant post on a decent …Bless, bragging about your travels with an irrelevant post on a decent deal about a medical kit suited to the UK. For the hard of learning its called hotUKdeals


Ah bless who pulled you out of the toilet. It's called context love.

Cute name "TKDBlackbelt"... I bet you like it when the boys give you the attention and grappling man to man.

If that is the logic then we should not be posting about foreign holidays.
Edited by: "Sammy86" 7th Nov
smckirdy07/11/2019 17:25

If course they do, that's what a taxpayer funded heath service is for. …If course they do, that's what a taxpayer funded heath service is for. There is no need if you don't do high risk activities for work or pleasure to have training in first aid. Its certainly good to have, but not essential. Doing ALS or expeditionary medicine is ott. Am engineer, can confirm rocket surgery not that hard.


Actually it would be more ATLS or the European standard as ATLS is outdated American trauma course.

I doubt chemical engineering or neurosurgery is easy...
Edited by: "Sammy86" 7th Nov
Lets get back to topic, I like reading verified purchase comments but given how easy it is to abuse, has anyone here actually brought this specific item.

Is the bag as good as it looks?
Sammy8607/11/2019 18:58

Actually it would be more ATLS or the European standard as ATLS is …Actually it would be more ATLS or the European standard as ATLS is outdated American trauma course.I doubt chemical engineering or neurosurgery is easy...


ALS is the European version, ATLS is similar but not the same. In the UK you would do ALS and then an expeditionary, paramedic or combat medicine course to actually be trained to use the aforementioned items. Tourniquets are actually specifically restricted for first aiders.

Rockets would be mechanical engineering more than chemical. They aren't a process, rocket fuel is chemical engineering, but most first years could design rocket fuel plants.
Sammy8607/11/2019 05:13

And your input is?If you don't have anything useful to say...It would be …And your input is?If you don't have anything useful to say...It would be like me commenting on say loose some weight perhaps, stopping drinking, smoking and/or eating fatty foods as that may reduce symptoms of gord/hiatus hernia instead of taking ppi...


Wow, you've actually gone looking at other unrelated deals that I've commentated on?!
How creepy. Take a chill pill, pal, I'm done here.
smckirdy08/11/2019 00:30

ALS is the European version, ATLS is similar but not the same. In the UK …ALS is the European version, ATLS is similar but not the same. In the UK you would do ALS and then an expeditionary, paramedic or combat medicine course to actually be trained to use the aforementioned items. Tourniquets are actually specifically restricted for first aiders.Rockets would be mechanical engineering more than chemical. They aren't a process, rocket fuel is chemical engineering, but most first years could design rocket fuel plants.


ALS is advanced life support, more medical emergencies.
All first responders in hospital or part of the crash team have obligation to have an update ALS.

ATLS is Adult Trauma Life Support, for all things trauma developed by an American orthopaedic surgeon after he crashed his Cessna and the immediate care was abysmal.
It is on the syllabus for A&E doctors, ITU, and surgeons.
Now been phased out in the UK and replaced with the European equivalent which arguably is more sensible.

There is a paediatric equivalent.

Then there is prehospital trauma course.

Tourniquets actually been adopted since recent military interventions as mantra now is catastrophic haemorrhage then cervical spine stabilisation followed by standard ABCDE.

I doubt it's that easy setting up a rocket fuel plant... Otherwise our North Korea or Iranian friends would have developed their multistage medium to long range ballistic missile system using solid fuel rather than volatile liquid fuels systems decades ago.
Edited by: "Sammy86" 8th Nov
Sammy8608/11/2019 02:37

ALS is advanced life support, more medical emergencies.All first …ALS is advanced life support, more medical emergencies.All first responders in hospital or part of the crash team have obligation to have an update ALS.ATLS is Adult Trauma Life Support, for all things trauma developed by an American orthopaedic surgeon after he crashed his Cessna and the immediate care was abysmal.It is on the syllabus for A&E doctors, ITU, and surgeons.Now been phased out in the UK and replaced with the European equivalent which arguably is more sensible.There is a paediatric equivalent.Then there is prehospital trauma course.Tourniquets actually been adopted since recent military interventions as mantra now is catastrophic haemorrhage then cervical spine stabilisation followed by standard ABCDE.I doubt it's that easy setting up a rocket fuel plant... Otherwise our North Korea or Iranian friends would have developed their multistage medium to long range ballistic missile system using solid fuel rather than volatile liquid fuels systems decades ago.


Yes I'm aware of all that, but it's HUKD not wikipedia.

Tourniquets are still not allowed at least at the time of my last update on train the trainer for St John's for first aiders. If you use one you aren't covered by the insurance.

They don't have issues with that, they have issues with guidance systems and precision manufacturing. Rockets ground to surface precision missiles are much more complex than normal rockets, both have space launch capability(barring sabotage). People do it as a hobby.
smckirdy08/11/2019 07:34

Yes I'm aware of all that, but it's HUKD not wikipedia.Tourniquets are …Yes I'm aware of all that, but it's HUKD not wikipedia.Tourniquets are still not allowed at least at the time of my last update on train the trainer for St John's for first aiders. If you use one you aren't covered by the insurance.They don't have issues with that, they have issues with guidance systems and precision manufacturing. Rockets ground to surface precision missiles are much more complex than normal rockets, both have space launch capability(barring sabotage). People do it as a hobby.


I thought I should correct your mistake as the stated were incorrect.

Ah good old St John's... A pastime in secondary school. As my orthopaedic traumatology mate says good for bumps and bruises. Almost like the paramedics that intubate any patient with a reduced GCS.

Erm I think they do. Foundation of both space programme and ballistic missile programme is fundamentally the same. The multi stage launchers. The guidance systems I'm sure you know based upon gyroscopic navigation but ideally space based guidance. Iran did carry tests that UNSC did comment on as well as under the JPCOA 2015 asks Iran to refrain on ballistic missile tests. If you read the work of Uzi Rubin, guidance system are semantics, the actual launch vehicle that requires refinement.

Yeah yeah I know but when I fly around my aerodrome they have rocket enthusiasts but don't reach more than a few hundred metres. Not high enough as on cross country navigation fly at 2000 feet on VFR.
Made a mistake reading the comments, Gosh the amount of negative energy Some folks have to find friends I guess. It's a bloody first aid kit
Sammy8608/11/2019 08:36

I thought I should correct your mistake as the stated were incorrect.Ah …I thought I should correct your mistake as the stated were incorrect.Ah good old St John's... A pastime in secondary school. As my orthopaedic traumatology mate says good for bumps and bruises. Almost like the paramedics that intubate any patient with a reduced GCS.Erm I think they do. Foundation of both space programme and ballistic missile programme is fundamentally the same. The multi stage launchers. The guidance systems I'm sure you know based upon gyroscopic navigation but ideally space based guidance. Iran did carry tests that UNSC did comment on as well as under the JPCOA 2015 asks Iran to refrain on ballistic missile tests. If you read the work of Uzi Rubin, guidance system are semantics, the actual launch vehicle that requires refinement.Yeah yeah I know but when I fly around my aerodrome they have rocket enthusiasts but don't reach more than a few hundred metres. Not high enough as on cross country navigation fly at 2000 feet on VFR.


I wasn't mistaken you brought up ALTS, I said ALS from the start since that's the standard progression in the UK of medical training for trauma/emergency medicine that most people will have or will go out and get to supplement training if they don't want to go on to dedicated training for trauma medicine. Other than application of tourniquets that unless you are a medical professional you can't get indemnified for ALS covers everything you mentioned.

The problem Iran and North Korea have is primarily manufacturing base. Like Nuclear the engineering is all astonishingly simple, but you need a manufacturing base capable of supporting both precision and materials which neither country possesses due to sanctions not any particular technical challenge.

Civilian rocketry is limited by the availability of materials and cost, some of the newer lightweight launch systems on the civilian market really aren't substantially improved from the more dedicated high end amateurs with more money than sense. The barriers far more regulatory than technical as anyone can buy precision components in the UK or USA etc. for the most part if they have the money, but there is key components that are licensed and of course you have an airspace restriction. Its essentially how the Electron rocket was put together, it doesn't have any real special technology or unique know how you can't learn at any good university or even a decent book, it just has enough money to buy precision equipment and systems and get regulator approval and licenses.
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