Loft Boards/Panels x 3. £6.49/£5.29 if buy 5 packs or more at Wickes
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Loft Boards/Panels x 3. £6.49/£5.29 if buy 5 packs or more at Wickes

22
Found 8th Oct 2012
Had to buy some of these to lay some flooring for plumber to come & play with water storage tank. Seemed a good deal as last time purchased some time back sure was £9.99 a pack. Tongued and Grooved structural panels for fast installation

22 Comments

Cheaper if you call your local timber merchant and have an 8' x 4' board cut down to size and you'll get more for your money.

englishrick

Cheaper if you call your local timber merchant and have an 8' x 4' board … Cheaper if you call your local timber merchant and have an 8' x 4' board cut down to size and you'll get more for your money.



Wow you have a timber merchant who can cut a chipboard sheet and leave it with a tongue and groove profile? awesome!

Excuse my ignorance here, but what's the difference between tongue n Grooved loft boards and normal chipboard floorbaords (as found in many a new house build)?

Reason for asking is we're having new carpets put down in the kids bedrooms and before the carpet fitter comes I'm thinking of replacing a small section. Wondered whether a sheet or 2 of this stuff would do the job.

new house builds have t & g

Thats a very good deal, at the moment ive seen these go for stupid money. Someone told me 4 weeks ago they paid over £2500 for a 7 floor house in London.. Heat

I agree with englishrick - i.e. you get more for your money if you go for the builder's size sheets at a builders merchants. However, rather than have the hassle of cutting sheets down, the sensible choice (if you have enough access to the loft) is to go for chipboard flooring sheets. These are stronger, more moisture resistant and cheaper (per sq m) - Wickes have them - wickes.co.uk/inv…516 - but they are cheaper again at a good builders merchants. (And they are bloomin heavy!)

This deal still gets some heat from me though!

@neilcaldwell - these loftboards aren't as strong as flooring sheets (like the ones above), and don't usually have the same moisture resistance. The T&G ensures where the boards butt against each other that they are locked vertically. This makes the joins stronger and reduces the potential for creaking.
Edited by: "qyestionmark" 8th Oct 2012

STi_prodrive

Thats a very good deal, at the moment ive seen these go for stupid money. … Thats a very good deal, at the moment ive seen these go for stupid money. Someone told me 4 weeks ago they paid over £2500 for a 7 floor house in London.. Heat



if they can afford a 7-storey house in London then £2,500 should be peanuts.




--- oh wait, you meant 7 floors for 7 rooms?

Have some heat,

By the way what are the thick foam/boards laid under the loft boards in the second picture on the website???

Chipboard and water storage are not really a very good mix.

Nor is buying anything from Wickes, their prices are ridiculous just lately.

Inactive

Nor is buying anything from Wickes, their prices are ridiculous just … Nor is buying anything from Wickes, their prices are ridiculous just lately.



You say that but if your careful with material choices, depending on what your doing the cost is negligible if they give the 20% on bulk buy - infact my most recent project last month I needed plasterboard, cls studwork, some other timber and chipboard flooring and wickes came out £22 less then the nearest quote I got at the 3 timber / builders merchants nearby... go figure!


EDIT: - I am not defending them as some/most of the prices are complete whack, just some of the more big job stuff with bulk buy discounts comes in reasonably fair.
Edited by: "rendeverance" 9th Oct 2012

Inactive

Chipboard and water storage are not really a very good mix.Nor is buying … Chipboard and water storage are not really a very good mix.Nor is buying anything from Wickes, their prices are ridiculous just lately.



Timbers gones up massively this year........................

As an example 8x4 3/4" smart ply boards were £9.50ea on a price of 50 units.............6 months laters £12.99...........Massive hike but then its like everything............

I think this is a good deal for your average person whos going to do it there self and most people cant fit big sheets in there cars. Most merchants as well have min order for delivery.

Buying the smaller ones saves a lot of hassle:)

Just remember any cuts have to be half on a joist:) and use chipboard screws to avoice creaking and what i like to call twanging:D

I have just finished boarding the loft last weekend using these, I know I could of saved money using the bigger panels but theses are easier to handle and i value my back

Good price but as has been said it can work out cheaper if you can get 8x4 sheets cut to size at you local timer merchant. No tongue and groove granted but if its only being boarded for storage then it will be fine. Also if you need access to any wires under the boards later it will be much easier to lift a single section (btw when I did it I also marked on them with marker pen all the wire runs an junction boxes to find them easily at a later date).

One other thing to consider when boarding out the loft is how to get good insulation. Current building regs ask for 27cm of insulation (I think?), which is 10cm between joists and 17cm at right angles over joists.

Whilst it's hardly going to kill your heating bill, if you just board over the joists then you won't get that second layer. When I sorted out our loft I built a "deck" on top of the joists at right angles to the existing joists (using studwork timber with the second layer of insulation between) and then boarded over that with 8' x 2' boards. Probably overkill (though here in N Wales it gets ****ing cold in that loft sometimes!), but it didn't cost a lot more (other than in time) and everything is now rock solid for everything I want to put up there.

Agree with the tip about marking wiring runs etc!

J4GG4

Have some heat,By the way what are the thick foam/boards laid under the … Have some heat,By the way what are the thick foam/boards laid under the loft boards in the second picture on the website???



As the description says..... space board insulation
wickes.co.uk/inv…280


qyestionmark

One other thing to consider when boarding out the loft is how to get good … One other thing to consider when boarding out the loft is how to get good insulation. Current building regs ask for 27cm of insulation (I think?), which is 10cm between joists and 17cm at right angles over joists.Whilst it's hardly going to kill your heating bill, if you just board over the joists then you won't get that second layer. When I sorted out our loft I built a "deck" on top of the joists at right angles to the existing joists (using studwork timber with the second layer of insulation between) and then boarded over that with 8' x 2' boards. Probably overkill (though here in N Wales it gets ****ing cold in that loft sometimes!), but it didn't cost a lot more (other than in time) and everything is now rock solid for everything I want to put up there.Agree with the tip about marking wiring runs etc!



You can use boards that have insulation on the back of them but this reduces the ceiling height and can be expensive - http://www.diy.com/nav/build/insulation/loft-insulation/B-and-Q-Insulated-Timber-Loft-Board-L-1200-x-W-320-x-D-123mm-10647753

or you can use loft legs - http://www.wickes.co.uk/loft-legs-12-pack/invt/100412/?source=123_74

I just put some old carpet over the loft boards because I needed the space.

We're getting our 1970's loft re-insulated within the next month or two using one of these government grants that's now available to most people, even those not on benefits

My concern is how hard it will be to re-fit the current floor boards once additional insulation has been added to our current 'bitty' insulation - No idea how to describe our current insulation, other than 'bitty'!
Presuming the new insulation is fitted properly (i.e. parallel to and across the joists), surely it will be hard to re-fit boarding as it will no longer be flush against the joists?

theshabster

We're getting our 1970's loft re-insulated within the next month or two … We're getting our 1970's loft re-insulated within the next month or two using one of these government grants that's now available to most people, even those not on benefits :DMy concern is how hard it will be to re-fit the current floor boards once additional insulation has been added to our current 'bitty' insulation - No idea how to describe our current insulation, other than 'bitty'!Presuming the new insulation is fitted properly (i.e. parallel to and across the joists), surely it will be hard to re-fit boarding as it will no longer be flush against the joists?



You're right, you have a problem! You can't just put the boarding back on top of the new insulation as it will squash it - result would be unstable boards and useless insulation. You also then have quite a lot of force pushing down on the plaster boards below! What you need is something to physically support the boards 170mm above the existing joists.

I liked sharpe's suggestion of loft legs (see his link above), but these strike me as quite expensive (maybe they are cheaper elsewhere?). I went for laying a 2nd set of "joists" at right angles on top of the joists with the top insulation between. Depending on how strong the final boarding is, you may only need two joists per m (in which case you only need 2m length of timber per sq m of boarding, which can be quite cheap - about a third the cost of those loft legs?) I used studding timber, and have to confess I only went for 90mm of depth here (with a 2nd layer of 100mm insulation), but it seemed like the best compromise for strength, cost and insulation. Ironically Wickes were the cheapest place I could find sensible studding! wickes.co.uk/inv…713

HTH!

Edited by: "qyestionmark" 9th Oct 2012

Thanks. So roughly what depth of insulation do you now have, and is it one layer? By one layer I mean is there anything separating the layers of insulation from one another - i.e. A layer of insulation, then boarding, then another layer of insulation?

I'm not exactly a DIY expert, so just hoping for a simple solution to re-board the loft once this new insulation has been installed.

Edited by: "theshabster" 9th Oct 2012

Come on folks, theres more than fibre glass insulation out there!

My own loft situation: height is as low as the great escape tunnel, casuing a problem for access boarding out & insulation.

Whereever I rip up floorboards Or walls I insulate behind or under, adding to the overall thermal blanket, eg cold kitchen downstairs, then under floorboards in bedroom above is insulated with fibreglass roll (sealed & supported) checking for wiring & plumbing which is also noted & marked on the floor & room plan.

In the loft we between our rafter joists we placed 60 / 70mm xtratherm foil / foil foam board insulation cut to fit & sealed into place along the edges..

loosely speaking the xtratherm (other brands are available, e.g. kingspan) has2x the insulation value of the same amount of fibreglass laid down, so is very thermally efficient & worth the cost in any application!

we then board over with standard t&g loft boards (make pilot holes with the dremel 1st then a standard 14v l/ion battery drill is fine to finish off with a load of 5x40mm rapidrive (sharp tipped screws to negate pilot holes, but as this is chip board, not a good idea to neglect making).

Then we cover over in another layer of moveable bagged roll fibreglass insulation which is cut in easy to handle lengths to assist access if & when we need to move around (on stomach, the loft or simply to drape on top of stuff we stick on the boards.

You have to go a long way with fibre glass depth wise before it becomes pointless in terms of thermal escape vs pricepoint! ..basically the more insulation the better, lag those foam covered HW tanks & see the difference! (imho where possible we should up HW tank insulation by a factor of 3).

not a fan of the isobubble / general foil wadding "thin" insulation, the building trade figures jury has been out as to it's real use based on wild claims & discrepancies in the early years!

for me it's builders yard delivery of xtratherm or a pallet of seconds from "seconds & co"!

VDisillusioned

Wow you have a timber merchant who can cut a chipboard sheet and leave it … Wow you have a timber merchant who can cut a chipboard sheet and leave it with a tongue and groove profile? awesome!


All good and well having tongue and groove, but if you have to take one up in the middle, you have to take the whole lot up or f**k up the tongue and groove, hence why with my job as a Loft Converter we use 8x4 sheets cut to either two 6' x 2' and a 4' x 2' or four 4' x 2' dependent on the joist spacing..

good tip lofty
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