Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
LoftZone StoreFloor Kit - Small (2.4m x 2.4m) for £93.49 delivered @ Homebase
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LoftZone StoreFloor Kit - Small (2.4m x 2.4m) for £93.49 delivered @ Homebase

£93.49£10914%Homebase Deals
Deal editor34
Deal editor
Posted 13th Feb

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

If you want to do up your attic space for storage, then this might be just the ticket. Please note that this isn't an option for converting your loft into a bedroom, just for an additional storage space.

For £93.49 including delivery, you'll get the small LoftZone StoreFloor kit (6 sq. metres), which includes the supports and fixtures only. You'll need to source the loft boards and insulation separately, either on the Homebase site or elsewhere.

You can also get the medium package (13 sq. metres for three-bed house) for £169.99 delivered: homebase.co.uk/lof…609

"Transform your dreary attic into a safe, clean and storage area with StoreFloor by LoftZone."

Details
  • Material: Recycled plastic and galvanised steel.
  • Features: Loft decking for safe access and storage, which also provides loft insulation protection and save on heating bills.
  • Includes: Instructions & screws.
  • Additional information: The kit covers 6 sq. metres, ideal for a two bedroom house.
  • Fitting instructions: Insulation and loft boards sold separately.
  • Usage: An easy DIY way to create a deck above your insulation, protecting it and opening up your loft as a useable space again.
  • Dimensions: (H)240 x (W)240 x (D)28cm = 6 square metres

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Surely you'd be losing a lot of loft space using this? Standing 30cm above the crossbeams will take a lot away with a sloping roof.
New build houses come with 270mm of loft insulation, so avoids having to compress this. So I've read anyway.
I would also add that I'd be concerned at putting all of the weight pressure of distinct spots on the rafters, rather than spreading the weight along the entire length (as you would if you just laid loft boards).......just doesn't look like a great idea to me, but then I'm not a structural engineer.
34 Comments
be sure NOT to cut through any internal roof members !!!! when flooring ...
misterboumsong13/02/2020 12:41

be sure NOT to cut through any internal roof members !!!! when flooring ...


Luckily no sawing necessary for these. Just try not to put your foot through the ceiling!
misterboumsong13/02/2020 12:41

be sure NOT to cut through any internal roof members !!!! when flooring ...


What like by accident? Really?
Surely you'd be losing a lot of loft space using this? Standing 30cm above the crossbeams will take a lot away with a sloping roof.
N1Andy13/02/2020 12:50

Surely you'd be losing a lot of loft space using this? Standing 30cm above …Surely you'd be losing a lot of loft space using this? Standing 30cm above the crossbeams will take a lot away with a sloping roof.


I suppose so, but I think it is designed for ease of use.
New build houses come with 270mm of loft insulation, so avoids having to compress this. So I've read anyway.
EBinns13/02/2020 12:54

New build houses come with 270mm of loft insulation, so avoids having to …New build houses come with 270mm of loft insulation, so avoids having to compress this. So I've read anyway.


There is a specific one for new builds I think. Not on here though.
N1Andy13/02/2020 12:50

Surely you'd be losing a lot of loft space using this? Standing 30cm above …Surely you'd be losing a lot of loft space using this? Standing 30cm above the crossbeams will take a lot away with a sloping roof.



Looks that way, I guess it's to add more insulation.
I'm planning to just get some 3 or 4" wood and put them on top of the existing beams, then put board down.
Edited by: "daver77" 13th Feb
I would also add that I'd be concerned at putting all of the weight pressure of distinct spots on the rafters, rather than spreading the weight along the entire length (as you would if you just laid loft boards).......just doesn't look like a great idea to me, but then I'm not a structural engineer.
I've kitted out a few roof spaces with this and it's pretty good. I always order extra brackets
It may or may not take away much headroom depending on the pitch of your roof so worth checking. The 279mm they claim should be ok currently as traditionally for a fibre insulated roofspace there will be 100mm between ceiling joists and then 170mm or 200mm across them. So this'll provide a 79mm gap. This should allow for some airflow across the top of the insulation and below the flooring which should stop any condensation. The only thing to note is if standards change or you wish to insulate beyond the current standard to say add another 100mm you'll obviously need to create suitable spacers.

I speak from experience as I had b&q ones which left about 170mm from the existing insulation. I added 170mm insulation so used spacers to lift the boards an extra 70mm or so just to ensure no future issues. Head room didn't suffer but I have a traditional 35-ish degree roof pitch.
Edited by: "OFAH" 13th Feb
I used a similar system to create storage in my loft, working in the centre of the loft only (where the beams cross over brickwork...) would not recommend them for reaching out across the loft, too much pressure on those little legs could cause cracked ceilings.
Would this not work out a lot cheaper?
diy.com/dep…prd
OFAH13/02/2020 13:02

The 279mm they claim should be ok currently as traditionally for a fibre …The 279mm they claim should be ok currently as traditionally for a fibre insulated roofspace there will be 100mm between ceiling joists and then 170mm or 200mm across them. So this'll provide a 79mm gap.


Yes, had a comfortable gap when I added 200mm insulation and built Loftzone above it.

It's a little pointless worrying about losing headroom though, this isn't robust enough for anything more than storage and occasional visits, especially if you use standard loftboards. Sways and bends just enough under my weight to be unpleasant to stand on. Otherwise, it's pretty good.
anonymoose113/02/2020 14:16

Yes, had a comfortable gap when I added 200mm insulation and built …Yes, had a comfortable gap when I added 200mm insulation and built Loftzone above it.It's a little pointless worrying about losing headroom though, this isn't robust enough for anything more than storage and occasional visits, especially if you use standard loftboards. Sways and bends just enough under my weight to be unpleasant to stand on. Otherwise, it's pretty good.


Yeah for handiness sake I used the b&q stilts and loftboard packs and it more than is adequate for the usual Christmas tree/decorations, empty boxes and suitcases that usually get stored in roofspaces! I followed the guidelines for the stilts which made them expensive enough but no issues with it swaying mine feels rock solid. No issues on the ceilings and mines been in well over a year maybe 2. Truss roof too so it won't be as over engineered as a cut roof but still no issues.

Like everything it's about being sensible. Try and use it as a library and store half a ton of books and you might have issues
Edited by: "OFAH" 13th Feb
Essentially this lifts the boards above the insulation, if you compress the insulation then it’s insulation value goes down by 50%, I’ve used these in my new build loft and they just come close to the top of the insulation, would recommend,
Would it not be easier and quicker just to lay another layer of beams on top of the first, then top off with boards. My thinking is there would be a greater support structure.
daver7713/02/2020 13:00

Looks that way, I guess it's to add more insulation.I'm planning to just …Looks that way, I guess it's to add more insulation.I'm planning to just get some 3 or 4" wood and put them on top of the existing beams, then put board down.


Will you get the necessary depth of insulation doing it that way? Or aren't you bothered about the insulation?
DodgeySolenoid13/02/2020 18:06

Will you get the necessary depth of insulation doing it that way? Or …Will you get the necessary depth of insulation doing it that way? Or aren't you bothered about the insulation?


Already has insulation between the beams.
daver7713/02/2020 18:40

Already has insulation between the beams.


What, the recommended 270~300mm?
TristanDeCoonha13/02/2020 17:38

Would it not be easier and quicker just to lay another layer of beams on …Would it not be easier and quicker just to lay another layer of beams on top of the first, then top off with boards. My thinking is there would be a greater support structure.


Have read through the comments here.

Yes you could just add more beams to the ceiling joists. However, I'd query whether most would use 200-250mm beams to allow for ventilation above the joists. Also I'd note that this would lead to a *huge* increase in the weight being borne by the ceiling joists if not all resting on load bearing walls.

The LoftZone system is also a *lot* better constructed than the flimsy loft legs that you can get from B&Q. Having used the system to put about 15 sq m of boarding in our current property, it's been incredibly easy to construct, and I have absolutely no qualms about standing and walking around on the stuff - which couldn't be said for the loft leg versions.

I hope this helps!
DodgeySolenoid13/02/2020 19:23

What, the recommended 270~300mm?


not far off, i'd rather be able to stand up in the loft
Edited by: "daver77" 13th Feb
daver7713/02/2020 20:41

not far off, i'd rather be able to stand up in the loft


How far off?
I live in a new build and was advised not to store anything in the loft because it's constructed to support the weight of the roof and the ceilings and little else. Is that true? I'd love to store some of my son's outgrown clothes up there but don't want to cause any problems...
misterboumsong13/02/2020 12:41

be sure NOT to cut through any internal roof members !!!! when flooring ...


Why? I’ve double joist, moved and removed queen truss, converting a loft normally involves some cutting and reinforcing. Do you mean for the general public not us tradesmen?
merikiito13/02/2020 13:59

Would this not work out a lot …Would this not work out a lot cheaper?https://www.diy.com/departments/diall-loft-storage-stilt-pack-of-12/3663602538240_BQ.prd


These are what I used for a similar job. Pretty easy to install. I imagine this storefloor kit is more sturdy for frequent use, but mine's just for long term storage of relatively light stuff.

I also stuck some of these up:

wickes.co.uk/Lof…291
Mrepg14/02/2020 07:53

Why? I’ve double joist, moved and removed queen truss, converting a loft n …Why? I’ve double joist, moved and removed queen truss, converting a loft normally involves some cutting and reinforcing. Do you mean for the general public not us tradesmen?


General public. I mean people just cutting roof members without strengthening adjacent roof timbers.
ScampiLamp14/02/2020 05:56

I live in a new build and was advised not to store anything in the loft …I live in a new build and was advised not to store anything in the loft because it's constructed to support the weight of the roof and the ceilings and little else. Is that true? I'd love to store some of my son's outgrown clothes up there but don't want to cause any problems...


The loft itself is not responsible for holding your roof up, the wooden structure formed by the ridges, rafters and joists are. If you go up there you can see the structure is basically triangles which all rest on load bearing walls and sometimes a main beam running between main walls. The joists are safe to walk on, many trades need access to that space. For safety get the loft space boarded out and spread the load of stuff you want to store up there.
I really like the look of this but it's quite a bit more expensive than using loft stilts from B&Q or Wickes.

Also while looking at it just now.

In the example pictures above the weight of 16 loft boards is carried by 20 Loftzone stilts costing 93.49.

Using the recommendation of 6 stilts per board for B&Q or WIckes gives the weight carried by 45 stilts yet costing only 60.00.
Also you'd have 3 spare stilts and in the case of Wickes slightly higher (30cm) stilts for more insulation or condensation gap.

I have a new built finished in the last year and my insulation would most certainly take up the majority of the 27 - 27.9 of B&Q or LoftZone stilts.
Fitted the 'LoftZone StoreFloor Kit for New Build Houses (7m2)' that I purchased from Homebase in my loft last year. It has made a large storage area that is easy to walk on. The head room is obviously reduced but not so much that I cannot easily walk on the boards, it is actually easier to walk across than before due to the cross beams being easier to climb over. Also my insulation is not squashed down. It does seem expensive when you look at what you get but I am glad I fitted it.
ScampiLamp14/02/2020 05:56

I live in a new build and was advised not to store anything in the loft …I live in a new build and was advised not to store anything in the loft because it's constructed to support the weight of the roof and the ceilings and little else. Is that true? I'd love to store some of my son's outgrown clothes up there but don't want to cause any problems...



New builds are different as like you say its built to tight specs to only support a roof. The old houses that have acrington brick would probably support an extra house ontop.
I have the same system in my attic. It works well and allowed for much deeper layer of insulation. The missus has stored a ton of stuff up there on it, and so far we've had no problems in 7 years.
merikiito13/02/2020 13:59

Would this not work out a lot …Would this not work out a lot cheaper?https://www.diy.com/departments/diall-loft-storage-stilt-pack-of-12/3663602538240_BQ.prd


Yes. This works absolutely fine if you are just wanting some loft storage. I bought 2 packs of the stilts in your links and loft boards for less than half the price of the links at the top of this thread. Very easy to install as well if you have a cordless screwdriver.
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