Unfortunately, this deal is no longer valid
Make Your Own Beer Gift Set £7.99 (Makes 20 x 500ml bottles) @ B&M
447° Expired

Make Your Own Beer Gift Set £7.99 (Makes 20 x 500ml bottles) @ B&M

MODERATOR 41
MODERATOR
Posted 10th Jun 2018

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

B&M have started selling some homebrew gift sets which look quite good. These are £7.99 each and make 20 x 500ml bottles (10 litres) in around 3 weeks.

2953561.jpg
American IPA

  • A crisp, dry American style IPA with spicy, citrus hop aromas and a firm, satisfying bitterness.
  • Hops: cenrennial, chinook
  • Colour: Deep Gold
  • Average ABV: 5.6%
  • Bitterness: 4/5


2953561.jpg
Tequila & Lime Lager

  • A beer that combines Mexican lager and spirit making techniques. Clean, light and refreshing with sharp citrus notes balanced by a warming tequila kick and sweet finish.
  • Hops: Columbus, Hallertau, Brewers Gold
  • Colour: Pale Gold
  • Average ABV: 4.4%
  • Bitterness: 1/5


2953561.jpg
Real Ale

  • Fantastic sweet malt flavours with a mixture of fruit and caramel notes, balanced by a lingering crisp bitterness and punchy hop finish
  • Hops: Columbus, Hallertau, Brewers Gold
  • Colour: Dark Copper
  • Average ABV: 4.2%
  • Bitterness: 3/5


2953561.jpg
12 x 500ml Swing-top bottles - £9.99


2953561.jpg
Starter pack - £9.99

Includes:

  • Fermentation Bucket
  • Thermometer
  • Syphon Kit
  • Equipment Sanitiser
Community Updates
If you click through or buy, retailers may pay hotukdeals some money, but this never affects which deals get posted. Find more info in our FAQs and About Us page.

Groups

Top comments
GlentoranMark10/06/2018 18:36

We have our own beer making thread on HUKD but this is an amazing price …We have our own beer making thread on HUKD but this is an amazing price even for the seasoned pro.Kits have improved massively as noted above but 3 points1. Steer clear of lager kits. To brew a true lager you need a fridge and a lager yeast. Lagers brew at around 10 degrees.2. All Grain isn't hard nor expensive, it just takes longer but the versatility puts kits to shame. Google Stove Top Brewing.3. You won't replicate Carlsberg or another brand without their entire brewing process, so don't expect kits to do the same.As a sideline, I made a dark lager yesterday. See the brewing thread I linked above.


Point 3
To replicate Carling, simply drink some decent beer, empty yourself into bottles, place in fridge an Voila..Carling
zx636r10/06/2018 17:12

I tried making my own once.....shockingly awful.


There's a few things you can do to drastically improve the quality of these sort of kits, such as paying close attention to sanitisation and fermentation temperature. You can also switch out tap water for something like Tesco's Ashbeck water (currently £1.10 for 5L)
Edited by: "BeerDrinker" 10th Jun 2018
41 Comments
I tried making my own once.....shockingly awful.
zx636r10/06/2018 17:12

I tried making my own once.....shockingly awful.


There's a few things you can do to drastically improve the quality of these sort of kits, such as paying close attention to sanitisation and fermentation temperature. You can also switch out tap water for something like Tesco's Ashbeck water (currently £1.10 for 5L)
Edited by: "BeerDrinker" 10th Jun 2018
zx636r42 m ago

I tried making my own once.....shockingly awful.


Believe me things have changed, My first home brew many years ago tasted like pigs swill but nowadays if you buy a 2 tin mix that requires no extra sugar the results are far better than the rubbish you can buy in some pubs.
Just make sure you thoroughly sanitise all equipment and ferment at the recommended temperature and you'll get surprisingly good beer that will improve the longer you leave it in the bottles if you can resist drinking it.
Edited by: "PaulandPam" 10th Jun 2018
You boys need to get on youtube.Brewmasterben beerloverTV hanworth homebrew.

You would be suprised how good kits are
If I bought the beer starter pack that they do and one of these kits, is it quite easy to do? Thanks.
I always found keeping it at the required temperature impossible. How can you really do it?
We have our own beer making thread on HUKD but this is an amazing price even for the seasoned pro.

Kits have improved massively as noted above but 3 points

1. Steer clear of lager kits. To brew a true lager you need a fridge and a lager yeast. Lagers brew at around 10 degrees.

2. All Grain isn't hard nor expensive, it just takes longer but the versatility puts kits to shame. Google Stove Top Brewing.

3. You won't replicate Carlsberg or another brand without their entire brewing process, so don't expect kits to do the same.

As a sideline, I made a dark lager yesterday. See the brewing thread I linked above.
STEVEB7210/06/2018 18:22

If I bought the beer starter pack that they do and one of these kits, is …If I bought the beer starter pack that they do and one of these kits, is it quite easy to do? Thanks.


Yes, kits are simply sterilise and stir. That's all required. Use 2L 20p water bottles from Tesco's to bottle, no need to sterilise the bottles.

Leave the beer to mature and use the 2+2+2 rule before drinking (nothing wrong with sampling along the way). 2 weeks fermenting vessel, 2 weeks warm conditioning, 2 weeks cold conditioning, before you drink. Your best bottle will always be your last until you build up a stash.
xenophon16 m ago

I always found keeping it at the required temperature impossible. How can …I always found keeping it at the required temperature impossible. How can you really do it?


I'm building a brew shed but I'm getting fridges off Freecycle and using an Inkbird to control temperatures. It's a big step up but probably the best thing you can do to improve a kit.
GlentoranMark10/06/2018 18:40

Yes, kits are simply sterilise and stir. That's all required. Use 2L 20p …Yes, kits are simply sterilise and stir. That's all required. Use 2L 20p water bottles from Tesco's to bottle, no need to sterilise the bottles.Leave the beer to mature and use the 2+2+2 rule before drinking (nothing wrong with sampling along the way). 2 weeks fermenting vessel, 2 weeks warm conditioning, 2 weeks cold conditioning, before you drink. Your best bottle will always be your last until you build up a stash.


Thanks I’ll get a kit tomorrow and give it a try.
STEVEB7210/06/2018 18:53

Thanks I’ll get a kit tomorrow and give it a try.



Forgot to add you'll need sugar but for £8 it's worth a punt. As a seasoned brewer I'd buy this
Tried several times to brew beer,distaterous!
This looks very interesting and may give it a go.
Cheers! My partner owns a craft beer shop so may get this for Father's Day to give his own a try!
GlentoranMark10/06/2018 18:36

We have our own beer making thread on HUKD but this is an amazing price …We have our own beer making thread on HUKD but this is an amazing price even for the seasoned pro.Kits have improved massively as noted above but 3 points1. Steer clear of lager kits. To brew a true lager you need a fridge and a lager yeast. Lagers brew at around 10 degrees.2. All Grain isn't hard nor expensive, it just takes longer but the versatility puts kits to shame. Google Stove Top Brewing.3. You won't replicate Carlsberg or another brand without their entire brewing process, so don't expect kits to do the same.As a sideline, I made a dark lager yesterday. See the brewing thread I linked above.


Point 3
To replicate Carling, simply drink some decent beer, empty yourself into bottles, place in fridge an Voila..Carling
You can bottle into plastic bottles?
Won't it go flat?
I'll have a go at this. I have some kits in the garage"out of date" I would have thought that the tinned element would be ok, just replace the yeast etc. Any comments welcome.
Good price for someone to dabble. The weather is great for brewing right now. The Richie's simply kit is also good value on Amazon 11.88 for the extract and then you can add your own hops through dry hopping. I just bottled 60 bottles of pear cider last night for about 40p a bottle. It's good fun as you can share your produce with other people too.
If this is your first time making home brew can I suggest getting a wine making kit instead as you’ll have greater success, far easier. Beer/lager is more temperature sensitive, you may end up with treacle. The wines these days are really good too.
GlentoranMark3 h, 34 m ago

Forgot to add you'll need sugar but for £8 it's worth a punt. As a …Forgot to add you'll need sugar but for £8 it's worth a punt. As a seasoned brewer I'd buy this


The Range have dextrose for £2.
whereangelsplay5 h, 29 m ago

You can bottle into plastic bottles?Won't it go flat?


Plastic bottles are fine as long as long as they were originally used for a pressurised drink like coke etc.its best to buy brown plastic however to keep the sun away from the beer.
xenophon13 h, 22 m ago

I always found keeping it at the required temperature impossible. How can …I always found keeping it at the required temperature impossible. How can you really do it?


I use cheap aquarium 25W heaters and set at around 18 degrees for ales and bitters.
You can buy the heaters for around £7 from Amazon and they work great.
Once you really get into the brewing you can buy an Inkbird temperature controller and a cheapo fridge or freezer to brew a few at a time.
thewolf8u13 h, 10 m ago

If this is your first time making home brew can I suggest getting a wine …If this is your first time making home brew can I suggest getting a wine making kit instead as you’ll have greater success, far easier. Beer/lager is more temperature sensitive, you may end up with treacle. The wines these days are really good too.



Really simple for this time of year is Elderflower Fizzy Wine. The River Cottage Guide is so simple, just use a 5L water container to brew in with the lid lifted slightly.
American IPA?
GlentoranMark16 h, 41 m ago

Forgot to add you'll need sugar but for £8 it's worth a punt. As a …Forgot to add you'll need sugar but for £8 it's worth a punt. As a seasoned brewer I'd buy this



These kits come with the sugar. Inside you get the extract, 500g of dextrose, yeast and hops for a dry hop. You get the most extract with the IPA kit so I'd go with that over the others. The IPA is 5.6%, the real ale 4.4%. When it's time to bottle just use table sugar for priming (look up batch priming) and don't buy carbonation drops as they're a total rip off.

Never ever buy a lager kit.
I’m nearly finished fermenting the IPA at the moment. Smells really nice so am pleasantly surprised. I’ve added some grapefruit peel to pep it up a bit. Bottling it tomorrow. If it’s nice I’ll buy another.
I'm really into stuff like leffe, duvel, delirium tremens etc. Is it possible to make something along those lines myself?
Cheers Brad
GlentoranMark18 h, 13 m ago

We have our own beer making thread on HUKD but this is an amazing price …We have our own beer making thread on HUKD but this is an amazing price even for the seasoned pro.Kits have improved massively as noted above but 3 points1. Steer clear of lager kits. To brew a true lager you need a fridge and a lager yeast. Lagers brew at around 10 degrees.2. All Grain isn't hard nor expensive, it just takes longer but the versatility puts kits to shame. Google Stove Top Brewing.3. You won't replicate Carlsberg or another brand without their entire brewing process, so don't expect kits to do the same.As a sideline, I made a dark lager yesterday. See the brewing thread I linked above.


The coopers kits are the best, almost like the real thing
Wilkos is also good for bits and bobs of supplies for sugar and kits etc. They also do bottling kits and buckets for brewin
PhilipGregson16 h, 56 m ago

I'll have a go at this. I have some kits in the garage"out of date" I …I'll have a go at this. I have some kits in the garage"out of date" I would have thought that the tinned element would be ok, just replace the yeast etc. Any comments welcome.


As long as the tins not damaged at all, that part is probably okay. Tinned goods last bloody ages.

I would replace the yeast on almost any kit at all regardless of age. Just because it's often the cheapest possible yeast, you don't know where it's been stored and what temperature, you don't know how old it is. Get yourself some better dried yeasts (Fermentis and Mangrove Jacks both decent) for a few quid and get way better results.

With any home brew kits you buy make sure you store the yeast in the fridge as soon as you get it home. It will stay more effective when you inevitably take a while to get round to doing the kit. Just give it 24 hours to get to room temp before you use it.

If you don't have anywhere local that sells dried yeast, you'll want a spare sachet (of appropriate style) ready, in case you get a stuck fermentation.
BeerDrinker10/06/2018 17:18

There's a few things you can do to drastically improve the quality of …There's a few things you can do to drastically improve the quality of these sort of kits, such as paying close attention to sanitisation and fermentation temperature. You can also switch out tap water for something like Tesco's Ashbeck water (currently £1.10 for 5L)


Excellent tips. Sanitisation is vital to preventing off tastes or (god forbid) infection. Stable fermentation temperature will mean the yeast is happy and doesn't produce off flavours. And water replacement can help, especially if your tap water's not nice to drink.

The annoying bits I think are cleaning/sanitising, and bottling. After several years there are a few bits and pieces I could now not live without:

1) Starsan no-rinse sanitiser. It's not cheap but it goes a long way. Put it in a spray bottle, spray everything. No pissing around measuring out powders and rinsing.

2) A second bucket with a tap (for batch priming and bottling). You could carbonate your beer when bottling, by measuring out sugar per-bottle (or using carbonation drops). I prefer to rack off the lot into a second vessel, add the sugar in bulk, then stir well before bottling.

3) Little Bottler. This attaches to the bucket's tap and fills up bottles from down in the bottom. It's cleaner, easier, and crucially less air gets into the beer.
These should sell well in Scotland with there 50p a unit price. No minimum price on home brew.
bradevosprint4 h, 37 m ago

I'm really into stuff like leffe, duvel, delirium tremens etc. Is it …I'm really into stuff like leffe, duvel, delirium tremens etc. Is it possible to make something along those lines myself?Cheers Brad



I've tried a couple of kit beers in those styles before and it came out more like turbo beer. You can make decent beers in those styles but you would need and all grain kit and a temperature controlled fermentation as they need to be lagered (kept at specific low temperatures)

If you can't be bothered to make your own, I order all my belgian stuff from Beerwulf.com. Cheaper than tesco, 3x the selection and deliver to your door!
Edited by: "ahdinko" 11th Jun 2018
Yeah as has been said before, the most important bits are sanitise and clean taking no short cuts, temperature control (use fridge for an isolated environment and inkbird thermostat), and for each stage, WAIT.

The instructions almost always give minimum fermentation/conditioning times, so those who want beer yesterday can have it ASAP. But beer needs what's known as diacetyl rest, which clears off or sharp flavours over time. I never knew this until I'd done two rubbish tasting kits. For quality beer, you're wasting your time unless you just let time pass.
lmcshera11/06/2018 14:08

Excellent tips. Sanitisation is vital to preventing off tastes or (god …Excellent tips. Sanitisation is vital to preventing off tastes or (god forbid) infection. Stable fermentation temperature will mean the yeast is happy and doesn't produce off flavours. And water replacement can help, especially if your tap water's not nice to drink.The annoying bits I think are cleaning/sanitising, and bottling. After several years there are a few bits and pieces I could now not live without:1) Starsan no-rinse sanitiser. It's not cheap but it goes a long way. Put it in a spray bottle, spray everything. No pissing around measuring out powders and rinsing.2) A second bucket with a tap (for batch priming and bottling). You could carbonate your beer when bottling, by measuring out sugar per-bottle (or using carbonation drops). I prefer to rack off the lot into a second vessel, add the sugar in bulk, then stir well before bottling.3) Little Bottler. This attaches to the bucket's tap and fills up bottles from down in the bottom. It's cleaner, easier, and crucially less air gets into the beer.


Good tips here. I use no rinse sanitiser too but never thought to use in a sprayer before.
I've read about batch priming before but never done it. Will give it a go one day.
rickyroma12 h, 0 m ago

Good tips here. I use no rinse sanitiser too but never thought to use in a …Good tips here. I use no rinse sanitiser too but never thought to use in a sprayer before.I've read about batch priming before but never done it. Will give it a go one day.


Use Starsan in a spray bottle because it froths up on the items and fully covers them, I'm not too sure about using the granular sanitiser in a spray bottle though.
Edited by: "PaulandPam" 12th Jun 2018
think i'll try this home brew out may start of with the wine though as its supposedly easier

in scotland not a big drinker but no deals on alcohol anymore it kind of makes you resentful lol
I went ahead and bought this as a cheap entry point - if I like the process I'll invest in better gear. One thing though, it doesn't come with an airlock. The instructions say just don't click the lid fully closed to allow gas to escape. But doesn't that mean you have much less indication of how the fermentation is progressing? Should I get an airlock and bung and cut a hole in the lid of the bucket for it? Cheers
paranoidandy18/06/2018 10:10

I went ahead and bought this as a cheap entry point - if I like the …I went ahead and bought this as a cheap entry point - if I like the process I'll invest in better gear. One thing though, it doesn't come with an airlock. The instructions say just don't click the lid fully closed to allow gas to escape. But doesn't that mean you have much less indication of how the fermentation is progressing? Should I get an airlock and bung and cut a hole in the lid of the bucket for it? Cheers


It is not ideal but okay to just burp the lid every now and then instead of fitting an airlock. You can of course get a cheap airlock & gromit and drill a hole in the lid. Each time you use it though be sure to disassemble and properly sanitise each bit.

The airlock alone is not that accurate an indication of how fermentation is progressing (or more importantly when it's finished) because the lid seal or airlock seal might not be airtight. So the CO2 could be escaping elsewhere, leading you to believe it's finished when it's not. Then BOOM - bottle bombs.

You should really be using a hydrometer (cheap, think Wilko sell em) to test a carefully taken sample. If your reading stays the same for 3 days, and is somewhere near the gravity you expect, that's a good indication it's finished fermenting and is ready for bottle.

I know it's even more kit but I use one of these types of things
amazon.co.uk/Sun…ube

I drop the tube into the airlock hole and suck up a sample. Nice & easy.
lmcshera5 h, 5 m ago

It is not ideal but okay to just burp the lid every now and then instead …It is not ideal but okay to just burp the lid every now and then instead of fitting an airlock. You can of course get a cheap airlock & gromit and drill a hole in the lid. Each time you use it though be sure to disassemble and properly sanitise each bit.The airlock alone is not that accurate an indication of how fermentation is progressing (or more importantly when it's finished) because the lid seal or airlock seal might not be airtight. So the CO2 could be escaping elsewhere, leading you to believe it's finished when it's not. Then BOOM - bottle bombs.You should really be using a hydrometer (cheap, think Wilko sell em) to test a carefully taken sample. If your reading stays the same for 3 days, and is somewhere near the gravity you expect, that's a good indication it's finished fermenting and is ready for bottle.I know it's even more kit but I use one of these types of thingshttps://www.amazon.co.uk/Sungpunet-Syringe-Injector-Extractor-Reusable/dp/B074J75F4D/ref=sr_1_cc_4?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1529320655&sr=1-4-catcorr&keywords=syringe+tubeI drop the tube into the airlock hole and suck up a sample. Nice & easy.


Ah that's clever. I had planned to buy a hydrometer alright, and my local Wilko has them, so that's that decision made, cheers for the advice.

Also, maybe I'm the only one who didn't know this, but not all B&M's are licensed to sell booze, and the ones that aren't can't sell the brew kits so check in advance if making a trip for these.
Got one of the IPA as a small tester and just dry hopped it with 50g of citra and azacca. See how it turns out!
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text