Make your own small nature wildlife pond for frogs and newts 7ft x 7ft liner and underlay £10 @ pondliner bargains eBay.
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Make your own small nature wildlife pond for frogs and newts 7ft x 7ft liner and underlay £10 @ pondliner bargains eBay.

44
Found 10th AprEdited by:"SOUTHWALES"
As we build more houses and take up more land here is a chance to give back to nature and give a frog a home.

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The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put in a wildlife pond in my garden. There is a book "Newts in your pond and garden" by James Grundy, it is around £9.00 to buy at booksellers. This is a brilliant book, I followed the instructions on how to construct a wildlife pond and the results have been amazing. I filled my pond with water and plants in October and I had beetles in it 2 days later. 2 years after that I had Emperor dragonflies emerging out of my pond.
I have counted 40 - 50 newts each year in my 2.5m x 1.5 metre pond which is 26 inches deep. So my pond supports approx 160 - 200 newts in an area around my house of 1 square kilometre. In addition to the pond the newts need somewhere to hide in summer and hibernate in winter the book explains how to create that habitat. Young newts spend 3 years out of the pond before they return to breed.
Frogs are in serious trouble at the moment, the Rana (frog) virus has seriously affected their numbers. It arrived here in the Midlands 2/3 years ago. Before the virus struck I counted 80 - 85 frogs in my pond, in spring this year there was only 10 frogs. If you live further North you may not see the virus yet. My garden was full of dying thin frogs when it first arrived here.
As for maintenance a wildlife garden rewards the lazy gardener, my back garden is 35 m x 12m and I only tidy around 1-2 squares metres at a time and rest the garden in between tidying it. I have been rewarded with regular visits from hedgehogs and a young badger. I have CCTV with good night vision so we can look for our night time visitors. We keep chickens, they need to stay away from the pond as they would eat small newts, but we found we had more trouble with worms when the chickens were allowed to go near the pond.
OK so people with young children won't be happy about a wildlife pond, but newts are brilliant with kids, they freeze when threatened, so they will stay still on kids hands. So if you find what appears to be a dead newt just leave it, it will move away when it does not feel threatened. You will have to stop using weedkillers/pesticides makes for a very cheap and easy to keep garden.
Please note newts won't co-exist with fish, unless the pond is very big and there is plenty of cover, even then the amount of newts in the pond will be small.
We are talking about the Common/Smooth Newt here, if you have Great Crested newts in your garden you must declare their presence, as they are a protected species, you are unlikely to have them as they favour water that is a least 1 metre deep to breed.
You will need rainwater, you cannot add tap water to a wildlife pond unless it has been in a open container like a bucket for over 24 hours.
My pond cost £90 for the liner, £30 for underlay that goes under the liner, (you could use old carpet) and around £40 for a water butt and stand. Make sure there are no stones in the hole before you line it.
Thanks to the OP for giving me the chance to share to share this pleasure with the
hukd members.
It is a real privilege to have so much wildlife in my garden.
Edited by: "whathesmeg" 11th Apr
Is the material strong? I'd be worried they might ribbit
Edited by: "nicko123" 10th Apr
Love the idea, suspect our toddler would attempt to drown herself
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44 Comments
Love the idea, suspect our toddler would attempt to drown herself
7ft x 7ft liner IS £72
I was gonna do something like this but then people said it would be time consuming to look after
mchammer4 m ago

7ft x 7ft liner IS £72


That is 7m x 7m

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mchammer6 m ago

7ft x 7ft liner IS £72


No it isn't. That's 7m by 7m. You could do yourself a swimming pool with that.
chrisredmayne4 m ago

I was gonna do something like this but then people said it would be time …I was gonna do something like this but then people said it would be time consuming to look after


A pond can be as much or as little work as you make it. My grandparents used to have an old basin sunk into the lawn fringed with rocks and plants as a little pond. They used to get loads of frogs and interesting insects. The most maintenance you carried out was a couple of pails of rainwater from the water butt next to the shed
My next door neighbor has a little pond but I seem to see these quite often

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noddle3610 m ago

My next door neighbor has a little pond but I seem to see these quite …My next door neighbor has a little pond but I seem to see these quite often[Image]


You seem to see injured frogs quite often?
Is the material strong? I'd be worried they might ribbit
Edited by: "nicko123" 10th Apr
Squirrels
Great for breeding mosquitoes too
dataload8 h, 14 m ago

You seem to see injured frogs quite often?


Not improbable m my neighbours also had a small pond ( they spent more time trying to stop it going green than anything else ) , but frogs would get everywhere. Lawn cutting time was a trial , even looking under every lawn edging plant a few frogs managed to get caught up , horrible .
Nature ponds should go green tbh, fish ponds need a uv filter.
chrisredmayne10 h, 1 m ago

I was gonna do something like this but then people said it would be time …I was gonna do something like this but then people said it would be time consuming to look after


Nope. Don't do much with mine except top up with water occaisionally. That's the beauty of a wildlife pond.
Just ensure there is a shallow end so that anything that falls in can get out. Also a shallow end is great for the birds to use. Even a tiny pond can make all the difference so go for it.
The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put in a wildlife pond in my garden. There is a book "Newts in your pond and garden" by James Grundy, it is around £9.00 to buy at booksellers. This is a brilliant book, I followed the instructions on how to construct a wildlife pond and the results have been amazing. I filled my pond with water and plants in October and I had beetles in it 2 days later. 2 years after that I had Emperor dragonflies emerging out of my pond.
I have counted 40 - 50 newts each year in my 2.5m x 1.5 metre pond which is 26 inches deep. So my pond supports approx 160 - 200 newts in an area around my house of 1 square kilometre. In addition to the pond the newts need somewhere to hide in summer and hibernate in winter the book explains how to create that habitat. Young newts spend 3 years out of the pond before they return to breed.
Frogs are in serious trouble at the moment, the Rana (frog) virus has seriously affected their numbers. It arrived here in the Midlands 2/3 years ago. Before the virus struck I counted 80 - 85 frogs in my pond, in spring this year there was only 10 frogs. If you live further North you may not see the virus yet. My garden was full of dying thin frogs when it first arrived here.
As for maintenance a wildlife garden rewards the lazy gardener, my back garden is 35 m x 12m and I only tidy around 1-2 squares metres at a time and rest the garden in between tidying it. I have been rewarded with regular visits from hedgehogs and a young badger. I have CCTV with good night vision so we can look for our night time visitors. We keep chickens, they need to stay away from the pond as they would eat small newts, but we found we had more trouble with worms when the chickens were allowed to go near the pond.
OK so people with young children won't be happy about a wildlife pond, but newts are brilliant with kids, they freeze when threatened, so they will stay still on kids hands. So if you find what appears to be a dead newt just leave it, it will move away when it does not feel threatened. You will have to stop using weedkillers/pesticides makes for a very cheap and easy to keep garden.
Please note newts won't co-exist with fish, unless the pond is very big and there is plenty of cover, even then the amount of newts in the pond will be small.
We are talking about the Common/Smooth Newt here, if you have Great Crested newts in your garden you must declare their presence, as they are a protected species, you are unlikely to have them as they favour water that is a least 1 metre deep to breed.
You will need rainwater, you cannot add tap water to a wildlife pond unless it has been in a open container like a bucket for over 24 hours.
My pond cost £90 for the liner, £30 for underlay that goes under the liner, (you could use old carpet) and around £40 for a water butt and stand. Make sure there are no stones in the hole before you line it.
Thanks to the OP for giving me the chance to share to share this pleasure with the
hukd members.
It is a real privilege to have so much wildlife in my garden.
Edited by: "whathesmeg" 11th Apr
whathesmeg28 m ago

The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put …The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put in a wildlife pond in my garden. There is a book "Newts in your pond and garden" by James Grundy, it is around £9.00 to buy at booksellers. This is a brilliant book, I followed the instructions on how to construct a wildlife pond and the results have been amazing. I filled my pond with water and plants in October and I had beetles in it 2 days later. 2 years after that I had Emperor dragonflies emerging out of my pond. I have counted 40 - 50 newts each year in my 2.5m x 1.5 metre pond which is 26 inches deep. So my pond supports approx 160 - 200 newts in an area around my house of 1 square kilometre. In addition to the pond the newts need somewhere to hide in summer and hibernate in winter the book explains how to create that habitat. Young newts spend 3 years out of the pond before they return to breed.Frogs are in serious trouble at the moment, the Rana (frog) virus has seriously affected their numbers. It arrived here in the Midlands 2/3 years ago. Before the virus struck I counted 80 - 85 frogs in my pond, in spring this year there was only 10 frogs. If you live further North you may not see the virus yet. My garden was full of dying thin frogs when it first arrived here.As for maintenance a wildlife garden rewards the lazy gardener, my back garden is 35 m x 12m and I only tidy around 1-2 squares metres at a time and rest the garden in between tidying it. I have been rewarded with regular visits from hedgehogs and a young badger. I have CCTV with good night vision so we can look for our night time visitors. We keep chickens, they need to stay away from the pond as they would eat small newts, but we found we had more trouble with worms when the chickens were allowed to go near the pond.OK so people with young children won't be happy about a wildlife pond, but newts are brilliant with kids, they freeze when threatened, so they will stay still on kids hands. So if you find what appears to be a dead newt just leave it, it will move away when it does not feel threatened. You will have to stop using weedkillers/pesticides makes for avery cheap and easy to keep garden.Please note newts won't co-exist with fish, unless the pond is very big and there is plenty of cover, even then the amount of newts in the pond will be small.We are talking about the Common/Smooth Newt here, if you have Great Crested newts in your garden you must declare their presence, as they are a protected species, you are unlikely to have them as they favour water that is a least 1 metre deep to breed. You will need rainwater, you cannot add tap water to a wildlife pond unless it has been in a open container like a bucket for over 24 hours. My pond cost £90 for the liner, £30 for underlay that goes under the liner, (you could use old carpet) and around £40 for a water butt and stand. Make sure there are no stones in the hole before you line it. Thanks to the OP for giving me the chance to share to share this pleasure with the hukd members.It is a real privilege to have so much wildlife in my garden.


My pond is for koi so a very different setup (just over 8,000l), but my mum wants a wildlife pond so will hopefully be making one this year. I didn't know about the frog virus, I just thought the reason I had less visit was that when I changed the pond from what was originally here they couldn't get in.
whathesmeg28 m ago

The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put …The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put in a wildlife pond in my garden. There is a book "Newts in your pond and garden" by James Grundy, it is around £9.00 to buy at booksellers. This is a brilliant book, I followed the instructions on how to construct a wildlife pond and the results have been amazing. I filled my pond with water and plants in October and I had beetles in it 2 days later. 2 years after that I had Emperor dragonflies emerging out of my pond. I have counted 40 - 50 newts each year in my 2.5m x 1.5 metre pond which is 26 inches deep. So my pond supports approx 160 - 200 newts in an area around my house of 1 square kilometre. In addition to the pond the newts need somewhere to hide in summer and hibernate in winter the book explains how to create that habitat. Young newts spend 3 years out of the pond before they return to breed.Frogs are in serious trouble at the moment, the Rana (frog) virus has seriously affected their numbers. It arrived here in the Midlands 2/3 years ago. Before the virus struck I counted 80 - 85 frogs in my pond, in spring this year there was only 10 frogs. If you live further North you may not see the virus yet. My garden was full of dying thin frogs when it first arrived here.As for maintenance a wildlife garden rewards the lazy gardener, my back garden is 35 m x 12m and I only tidy around 1-2 squares metres at a time and rest the garden in between tidying it. I have been rewarded with regular visits from hedgehogs and a young badger. I have CCTV with good night vision so we can look for our night time visitors. We keep chickens, they need to stay away from the pond as they would eat small newts, but we found we had more trouble with worms when the chickens were allowed to go near the pond.OK so people with young children won't be happy about a wildlife pond, but newts are brilliant with kids, they freeze when threatened, so they will stay still on kids hands. So if you find what appears to be a dead newt just leave it, it will move away when it does not feel threatened. You will have to stop using weedkillers/pesticides makes for avery cheap and easy to keep garden.Please note newts won't co-exist with fish, unless the pond is very big and there is plenty of cover, even then the amount of newts in the pond will be small.We are talking about the Common/Smooth Newt here, if you have Great Crested newts in your garden you must declare their presence, as they are a protected species, you are unlikely to have them as they favour water that is a least 1 metre deep to breed. You will need rainwater, you cannot add tap water to a wildlife pond unless it has been in a open container like a bucket for over 24 hours. My pond cost £90 for the liner, £30 for underlay that goes under the liner, (you could use old carpet) and around £40 for a water butt and stand. Make sure there are no stones in the hole before you line it. Thanks to the OP for giving me the chance to share to share this pleasure with the hukd members.It is a real privilege to have so much wildlife in my garden.


A really helpful post. Big up yourself.
33616751-jmVhZ.jpg33616751-IuGJV.jpg33616751-V7awZ.jpg
The beauty of nature.
whathesmeg1 h, 40 m ago

The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put …The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put in a wildlife pond in my garden. There is a book "Newts in your pond and garden" by James Grundy, it is around £9.00 to buy at booksellers. This is a brilliant book, I followed the instructions on how to construct a wildlife pond and the results have been amazing. I filled my pond with water and plants in October and I had beetles in it 2 days later. 2 years after that I had Emperor dragonflies emerging out of my pond. I have counted 40 - 50 newts each year in my 2.5m x 1.5 metre pond which is 26 inches deep. So my pond supports approx 160 - 200 newts in an area around my house of 1 square kilometre. In addition to the pond the newts need somewhere to hide in summer and hibernate in winter the book explains how to create that habitat. Young newts spend 3 years out of the pond before they return to breed.Frogs are in serious trouble at the moment, the Rana (frog) virus has seriously affected their numbers. It arrived here in the Midlands 2/3 years ago. Before the virus struck I counted 80 - 85 frogs in my pond, in spring this year there was only 10 frogs. If you live further North you may not see the virus yet. My garden was full of dying thin frogs when it first arrived here.As for maintenance a wildlife garden rewards the lazy gardener, my back garden is 35 m x 12m and I only tidy around 1-2 squares metres at a time and rest the garden in between tidying it. I have been rewarded with regular visits from hedgehogs and a young badger. I have CCTV with good night vision so we can look for our night time visitors. We keep chickens, they need to stay away from the pond as they would eat small newts, but we found we had more trouble with worms when the chickens were allowed to go near the pond.OK so people with young children won't be happy about a wildlife pond, but newts are brilliant with kids, they freeze when threatened, so they will stay still on kids hands. So if you find what appears to be a dead newt just leave it, it will move away when it does not feel threatened. You will have to stop using weedkillers/pesticides makes for avery cheap and easy to keep garden.Please note newts won't co-exist with fish, unless the pond is very big and there is plenty of cover, even then the amount of newts in the pond will be small.We are talking about the Common/Smooth Newt here, if you have Great Crested newts in your garden you must declare their presence, as they are a protected species, you are unlikely to have them as they favour water that is a least 1 metre deep to breed. You will need rainwater, you cannot add tap water to a wildlife pond unless it has been in a open container like a bucket for over 24 hours. My pond cost £90 for the liner, £30 for underlay that goes under the liner, (you could use old carpet) and around £40 for a water butt and stand. Make sure there are no stones in the hole before you line it. Thanks to the OP for giving me the chance to share to share this pleasure with the hukd members.It is a real privilege to have so much wildlife in my garden.


After reading this, it’s made my mind up . Coincidentally, my son and I found Newts yesterday in the Brecon Beacons. And it was his first time . He’s only 4. And he is fascinated by all kinds of animals, bug and insects. So this is a great idea.
Had these before - fantastic bit of Kit. I ended up sticking another one in and having a koi pond - the kids love that too (feeding the fish). Heat given, really good price and it was there next day!
I built a pond when the last pond liner offer came up. I was so excited to see a frog took up inheritance after only a few weeks. I checked nightly to see how he/she was doing, until I was woken up at 3am by my neighbours cat fishing around in there; haven't seen the frog since
I fancy that for my allotment. thinking of getting a 7 ft sq liner but, the pond size quoted at the bottom of ebay says it will give you a pond size of 1'4" - is that right? doesn't sound awfully much bigger then a ruler!
I like turtles
Is it a good time of the year to create a pond?
Tweedie2 h, 22 m ago

I fancy that for my allotment. thinking of getting a 7 ft sq liner but, …I fancy that for my allotment. thinking of getting a 7 ft sq liner but, the pond size quoted at the bottom of ebay says it will give you a pond size of 1'4" - is that right? doesn't sound awfully much bigger then a ruler!


Buy as big a liner as your allotment can fit. Even a relatively small pond will attract a lot of frogs and other wildlife. As a kid I had an old washing up bowl prior to digging a proper pond.

Theyre not fussy and that bowl was packed! I would avoid adding any fish though as that will massively reduce frog/newt numbers if that’s your intention.
pjhf10035 m ago

Is it a good time of the year to create a pond?


The sooner you make it the sooner wildlife will move in.

It’s cleaning a pond which is the problem as time of year will potentially disturb breeding season or hibernation.
whathesmeg6 h, 35 m ago

The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put …The best garden project I've ever done in my 50+ years of gardening is put in a wildlife pond in my garden. There is a book "Newts in your pond and garden" by James Grundy, it is around £9.00 to buy at booksellers. This is a brilliant book, I followed the instructions on how to construct a wildlife pond and the results have been amazing. I filled my pond with water and plants in October and I had beetles in it 2 days later. 2 years after that I had Emperor dragonflies emerging out of my pond. I have counted 40 - 50 newts each year in my 2.5m x 1.5 metre pond which is 26 inches deep. So my pond supports approx 160 - 200 newts in an area around my house of 1 square kilometre. In addition to the pond the newts need somewhere to hide in summer and hibernate in winter the book explains how to create that habitat. Young newts spend 3 years out of the pond before they return to breed.Frogs are in serious trouble at the moment, the Rana (frog) virus has seriously affected their numbers. It arrived here in the Midlands 2/3 years ago. Before the virus struck I counted 80 - 85 frogs in my pond, in spring this year there was only 10 frogs. If you live further North you may not see the virus yet. My garden was full of dying thin frogs when it first arrived here.As for maintenance a wildlife garden rewards the lazy gardener, my back garden is 35 m x 12m and I only tidy around 1-2 squares metres at a time and rest the garden in between tidying it. I have been rewarded with regular visits from hedgehogs and a young badger. I have CCTV with good night vision so we can look for our night time visitors. We keep chickens, they need to stay away from the pond as they would eat small newts, but we found we had more trouble with worms when the chickens were allowed to go near the pond.OK so people with young children won't be happy about a wildlife pond, but newts are brilliant with kids, they freeze when threatened, so they will stay still on kids hands. So if you find what appears to be a dead newt just leave it, it will move away when it does not feel threatened. You will have to stop using weedkillers/pesticides makes for avery cheap and easy to keep garden.Please note newts won't co-exist with fish, unless the pond is very big and there is plenty of cover, even then the amount of newts in the pond will be small.We are talking about the Common/Smooth Newt here, if you have Great Crested newts in your garden you must declare their presence, as they are a protected species, you are unlikely to have them as they favour water that is a least 1 metre deep to breed. You will need rainwater, you cannot add tap water to a wildlife pond unless it has been in a open container like a bucket for over 24 hours. My pond cost £90 for the liner, £30 for underlay that goes under the liner, (you could use old carpet) and around £40 for a water butt and stand. Make sure there are no stones in the hole before you line it. Thanks to the OP for giving me the chance to share to share this pleasure with the hukd members.It is a real privilege to have so much wildlife in my garden.


Cool story bro.
Just kidding, it actually is
Will a 7ft x 7ft pond be big enough for our local chavs to lob a shopping trolley into?
The secret to clear pond water is to have least 50% of the surface area covered with plants like small lily's this will regulate algae growth and afer a couple of weeks of greeness it will clear...
hobbes7481 h, 1 m ago

Will a 7ft x 7ft pond be big enough for our local chavs to lob a shopping …Will a 7ft x 7ft pond be big enough for our local chavs to lob a shopping trolley into?


Pond life takes many forms!
One thing I forgot to mention, there needs to be a shallow part with a shelf so a hedgehog that gets into the pond can get out again. Plastic fencing anchored would do, chicken netting or drape some hessian sack material over the edge. The risk of a hedgehog drowning diminishes as your pond plants grow as a hedgehog can use them to crawl out again.
Edited by: "whathesmeg" 11th Apr
Ewwww, I shuddered at least 10 times looking at this post, the pics and typing this up.
MadonnaProject16 m ago

Ewwww, I shuddered at least 10 times looking at this post, the pics and …Ewwww, I shuddered at least 10 times looking at this post, the pics and typing this up.


There are Leeches in my pond....all wildlife is welcome!
This is good quality liner. I used it to reline a raised pond last year after a heron decided to puncture the previous one while stuffing itself on my fish.
whathesmeg45 m ago

There are Leeches in my pond....all wildlife is welcome!



I just poured salt on the sodding snails that come out at this time of the year. Was coming upto the house. Woosh I went with the salt. ******* things. I must remember to sprinkle the entire patio with salt tonight. Thanks for reminding me.
Edited by moderator: "removed swear word" 11th Apr
MadonnaProject31 m ago

I just poured salt on the sodding snails that come out at this time of the …I just poured salt on the sodding snails that come out at this time of the year. Was coming upto the house. Woosh I went with the salt. ******* things. I must remember to sprinkle the entire patio with salt tonight. Thanks for reminding me.


Frogs good as a natural slug/snail killer too.
If you have frogs you'll have virtually no snails or slugs, but you will find empty snail shells constantly.
Left my swimming pool out over the winter and it is now full of tadpoles.
If anybody in the Wirral/Chester area needs some to populate their pool just let me know.
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