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Marin Larkspur CS1 2019 - £179.99 @ Chain Reaction
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Marin Larkspur CS1 2019 - £179.99 @ Chain Reaction

53
Posted 19th Jun

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Nice cheap good quality simple bike. Decent seatpost clamp, double wall rims and importantly here stainless spokes, often left out on cheap bikes.

marinbikes.com/gb/bikes/2019-pavement-fitness-transit-city-sport-larkspur-cs1

  • Frame: Series 1 City + Sport, 6061 Aluminium, 700C Wheels, Fender and Rack Mounts
  • Fork: Steel, Straight Blade, Fender and Rack Eyelets

  • Crankset: Shimano FC-TY301, 48/38/28T, Ring Guard
  • Bottom Bracket: Sealed Cartridge Bearings, Square Taper
  • Front Derailleur: Shimano TY510
  • Rear Derailleur: Shimano Tourney, 7-Speed
  • Shift/Brake Lever: Shimano EF41 Shifter/Brake Lever Combo, 3x7-Speed
  • Brake Calipers: Forged Alloy Linear Pull V-Brake
  • Chain: KMC Z50
  • Cassette: SunRace 7-Speed, 11-34
  • Hubs: Forged Aluminium Alloy, 32H
  • Rims: Marin Aluminium Double Wall, Machined Sidewall
  • Spokes: 14g Stainless Steel
  • Tyres: Marin City + Sport 700x38c
  • Handlebar: Marin Alloy, 30mm Rise
  • Stem: Marin Alloy Adjustable Height Quill
  • Grips: Marin Commute
  • Headset: FSA, Threaded(shame its not Aheadset, not to worry)
  • Seatpost: Marin Alloy
  • Saddle: Marin City + Sport Plush
  • 3249708.jpg
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53 Comments
Showing as £199.99.
Looks a bit low quality
ItsFrazer19/06/2019 22:05

Looks a bit low quality



I wouldn't take it on a black run but more than capable as a commuter.
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deleted2115508
rugman19/06/2019 22:36

mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you …mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you could do a lot better for less money here:https://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-tempo-200-hybrid-bike-938428?colcode=93842845or if you want a mountain bikehttps://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-anarchy400-938453?colcode=93845322


I've no idea what those 2 odd-shaped things are you've linked to
tawse5719/06/2019 22:05

Showing as £199.99.


Really? Showing as AUS$309 for me. That would be quite the ride home.
deleted211550819/06/2019 22:37

I've no idea what those 2 odd-shaped things are you've linked to


They're called bikes, and are used as personal transport or recreation normally
Never worth £375 but seems great value at £200 or less. The gear range is absolutely huge it has a 11-34 cassette and a triple chainset so can be easy up the steepest hills and very fast on the flats and downhill. The range of 7 speed cassettes is much more limited but still hugely superior to a freewheel. Personally I'd put the real price at about £280 based on the components so a considerable saving on that and its nice to have the Marin branding. Are there any other freehub equipped bikes for less than £200 currently?
rugman19/06/2019 22:36

mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you …mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you could do a lot better for less money here:https://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-tempo-200-hybrid-bike-938428?colcode=93842845or if you want a mountain bikehttps://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-anarchy400-938453?colcode=93845322



The Marin will have a better frame(shaped tubes rather than scaffold poles), and will be lighter, Does the Muddy fox have stainless steel spokes, looks like painted black steel, they look a mess after a while once the paint flakes off.
rugman19/06/2019 22:36

mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you …mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you could do a lot better for less money here:https://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-tempo-200-hybrid-bike-938428?colcode=93842845or if you want a mountain bikehttps://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-anarchy400-938453?colcode=93845322


I have to agree although I would avoid Sportsdirect.

For ~£200 a threadless headset is the bare minimum in my opinion. I'd question why they skimped on that part.
supermann20/06/2019 03:29

I have to agree although I would avoid Sportsdirect. For ~£200 a …I have to agree although I would avoid Sportsdirect. For ~£200 a threadless headset is the bare minimum in my opinion. I'd question why they skimped on that part.


Care to share why the branded threaded headset is a deal breaker compared to the shed load of (effectively) non branded bloated components on the muddy fox rubbish?
wilf123420/06/2019 04:30

Care to share why the branded threaded headset is a deal breaker compared …Care to share why the branded threaded headset is a deal breaker compared to the shed load of (effectively) non branded bloated components on the muddy fox rubbish?


I didn't say they should buy the muddy fox, I said they should avoid Sportsdirect which is also inferring they shouldn't buy the Muddy Fox, effectively Sports Direct own brand bike.
Sorry, I thought you were implying that they should buy the muddy fox over this marin.....
Tbf, I slated the muddy fix without even bothering to look.

Having now looked at it, they do at least have some branded components. HOWEVER, the scaffold tube frame and non branded wheels will make it pretty horrific to cycle. Much better off with the marin.

(cue the elitist comments....)
supermann20/06/2019 03:29

I have to agree although I would avoid Sportsdirect. For ~£200 a …I have to agree although I would avoid Sportsdirect. For ~£200 a threadless headset is the bare minimum in my opinion. I'd question why they skimped on that part.


Easy, thread less headsets are much more faff for Joe Public to adjust the height of their handlebars. No one on a cruiser bike needs a low stack height.
wilf123420/06/2019 04:39

Tbf, I slated the muddy fix without even bothering to look.Having now …Tbf, I slated the muddy fix without even bothering to look.Having now looked at it, they do at least have some branded components. HOWEVER, the scaffold tube frame and non branded wheels will make it pretty horrific to cycle. Much better off with the marin. (cue the elitist comments....)


What a load of drivel, you clearly know nothing about bikes
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deleted2115508
rugman20/06/2019 07:55

What a load of drivel, you clearly know nothing about bikes


Dude those things you posted aren't bikes, they are bits if metal on top of two round things
deleted211550820/06/2019 07:57

Dude those things you posted aren't bikes, they are bits if metal on top …Dude those things you posted aren't bikes, they are bits if metal on top of two round things


Are you serious? Compared to the spec of the marin, it is superior in every way. The frame is a generic alloy China frame similar to many others with a Muddyfox sports direct sticker on it. Sure it ain't in the same league of decent 500 quid hybrid or mtb but it's a better deal than the marin and that's why I posted it. If you knew anything about bikes you'd know that
rugman20/06/2019 07:55

What a load of drivel, you clearly know nothing about bikes



Just go and find One of these bikes and check them out in the flesh.

Then and only then you may be entitled to slate me (although you're absolutely not!!)

Have a good day.
rugman20/06/2019 08:01

Are you serious? Compared to the spec of the marin, it is superior in …Are you serious? Compared to the spec of the marin, it is superior in every way. The frame is a generic alloy China frame similar to many others with a Muddyfox sports direct sticker on it. Sure it ain't in the same league of decent 500 quid hybrid or mtb but it's a better deal than the marin and that's why I posted it. If you knew anything about bikes you'd know that


Please please please go and check one of these Muddy Fox"s out in the flesh

Rather than stoop to your level of rudeness I will assume you have a reasonable knowledge about bikes and will hopefully be able to assess the quality of the frame and wheel set.

Then come back here and share your findings
wilf123420/06/2019 08:30

Please please please go and check one of these Muddy Fox"s out in the …Please please please go and check one of these Muddy Fox"s out in the fleshRather than stoop to your level of rudeness I will assume you have a reasonable knowledge about bikes and will hopefully be able to assess the quality of the frame and wheel set. Then come back here and share your findings


I've done more check them out, I own and ride one, so unlike you, I can make an informed comment on the quality of the components and build and how it rides
hotukdeals.com/dea…342
I've seen a few other bikes being linked..

Question for you experts:

I'm looking to start casual cycling over the Summer. Surfaces will include cycle paths and other paths in and around parks etc

I have no intention of off-roading or cycling for too long on roads.

Shall I buy the Marin or Muddyfox?

If Muddyfox, which one?
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deleted2115508
jUsT2eXy20/06/2019 09:05

I've seen a few other bikes being linked..Question for you experts:I'm …I've seen a few other bikes being linked..Question for you experts:I'm looking to start casual cycling over the Summer. Surfaces will include cycle paths and other paths in and around parks etc I have no intention of off-roading or cycling for too long on roads.Shall I buy the Marin or Muddyfox?If Muddyfox, which one?



Honestly, depends on what kind of surface you want to cycle on (tarmac or rougher), but if pretty smooth I'd say just buy something like decathlon.co.uk/tri…tml and skip the stuff here
rugman19/06/2019 22:36

mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you …mmm quill stem and old style headset, bottom end shimano, v-brakes, you could do a lot better for less money here:https://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-tempo-200-hybrid-bike-938428?colcode=93842845or if you want a mountain bikehttps://www.sportsdirect.com/muddyfox-anarchy400-938453?colcode=93845322


Looking at that Muddyfox hybrid bike it has low end suspension and a freewheel which makes it a heavier, less efficient and less reliable bike than the Marin. I think the Marin is a much better bike. That Muddyfox mountain bike is superb value based on its components but that is a mountain bike so not directly comparable with the Marin.

I personally don't have an issue with a quill stem and many people prefer them as they provide easy handlebar height adjustment. For a mountain bike a threadless headset is essential but for a road bike or hybrid used mainly on the road or a few gravel paths I see no problem with a threaded fork and quill stem as long as it's of decent quality.

Remember the pecking order of brakes.

1. Hydraulic disc brakes
2. Mechanical disc brakes
3. V brakes
4. Cantilever brakes
5. Dual pivot brakes
6. Single pivot brakes

V brakes are still very good brakes for the road and cheap and easy to maintain. I personally see the Marin as perfectly setup as a reliable, comfortable, fast and safe commuter bike. I can't really think of anything I would change. Those 700x38 tyres will soak up the bumps and provide huge grip. This is pretty much the perfect bike for those who want to spend the minimum without getting parts they don't need. The quill stem also means if you have 2 people in the family of similar height who would want to use the bike you can adjust the height fairly easily of the handlebars and saddle to get a good bike fit for either. I love the Carrera Subway models but they are considerably more expensive than this and all Halfords offer sub £200 is often freewheel equipped bikes which have multiple issues.
rugman20/06/2019 08:52

I've done more check them out, I own and ride one, so unlike you, I can …I've done more check them out, I own and ride one, so unlike you, I can make an informed comment on the quality of the components and build and how it rideshttps://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/muddyfox-anarchy-500-mtb-26-wheel-at-sportsdirect-online-28999-delivered-3236342


That's absolutely fair comment then. I'm glad you're happy with your purchase.

(you'll probably note however that you're in the minority here)
Personally on a cheap bike avoiding 1. Multiple front rings - one is enough ! 2. Disk brakes- fiddly and expensive to maintain 3- skinny tyres and presta valves - stick with 30mm min and Schrader valve you can fill the tube with slime.
Edited by: "kramer2088" 20th Jun
With the code this is actually £179.99.
Whitedot22/06/2019 00:02

With the code this is actually £179.99.


Yes, not sure if they have changed the details of the code..
kramer208820/06/2019 18:57

Personally on a cheap bike avoiding 1. Multiple front rings - one is …Personally on a cheap bike avoiding 1. Multiple front rings - one is enough ! 2. Disk brakes- fiddly and expensive to maintain 3- skinny tyres and presta valves - stick with 30mm min and Schrader valve you can fill the tube with slime.


Agree with you about the 1x setup but at least here it is a freehub so there is no or minimal wobble on the cogset which makes adjusting and using much easier. For some the extremely wide gear range will be very useful if they live somewhere with steep hills.
johnnystorm20/06/2019 07:38

Easy, thread less headsets are much more faff for Joe Public to adjust the …Easy, thread less headsets are much more faff for Joe Public to adjust the height of their handlebars. No one on a cruiser bike needs a low stack height.


Completely disagree. With a little knowledge (i.e. YouTube) and just a couple of allen keys that most people already possess, a threadless setup can be easily adjusted. Changing the bar height is just a question of moving spacers above or below the stem as required and they are lighter, less prone to seizing and more "standard" for when you need replacement bearings. Yes, I guess you can't quickly adjust it on the way (not that you would be able to with a quill stem once it's seized up!), but who really needs to do this anyway? You set it up and leave it.

Quill stems and threaded headsets require large, cone spanners to adjust which few people will have in their toolbox. If they ever come loose when you're out riding (and they will - bloody awful things), you won't have the tools with you to fix it.

I am with the person that recommended the Decathlon bikes. Much better. Something often forgotten on here: cheap does not necessarily mean good value.
daern25/06/2019 16:14

Completely disagree. With a little knowledge (i.e. YouTube) and just a …Completely disagree. With a little knowledge (i.e. YouTube) and just a couple of allen keys that most people already possess, a threadless setup can be easily adjusted. Changing the bar height is just a question of moving spacers above or below the stem as required and they are lighter, less prone to seizing and more "standard" for when you need replacement bearings. Yes, I guess you can't quickly adjust it on the way (not that you would be able to with a quill stem once it's seized up!), but who really needs to do this anyway? You set it up and leave it.Quill stems and threaded headsets require large, cone spanners to adjust which few people will have in their toolbox. If they ever come loose when you're out riding (and they will - bloody awful things), you won't have the tools with you to fix it.I am with the person that recommended the Decathlon bikes. Much better. Something often forgotten on here: cheap does not necessarily mean good value.


Sorry, I stand by my comment. It is easier to adjust the height of your bars. One Allen key on one bolt and job done. Instead of having to remove the whole stem and have it hanging off the cables, flip the spacers about, use a torque wrench to reset the bearing preload, then two more bolts on the stem itself.

Threaded headset parts are still easy to get. The notion of was of repair or tweaking is a bit moot when you look at the bike and it's intended user.
Edited by: "johnnystorm" 25th Jun
johnnystorm25/06/2019 16:59

Sorry, I stand by my comment. It is easier to adjust the height of your …Sorry, I stand by my comment. It is easier to adjust the height of your bars. One Allen key on one bolt and job done. Instead of having to remove the whole stem and have it hanging off the cables, flip the spacers about, use a torque wrench to reset the bearing preload, then two more bolts on the stem itself.Threaded headset parts are still easy to get. The notion of was of repair or tweaking is a bit moot when you look at the bike and it's intended user.


Torque wrench? For bearing preload? *shudder*

I'm sorry but quill stems were killed off more than 20 years ago for good reason and I, for one, would reject a bike out of hand purely because of its presence.
daern25/06/2019 17:24

Torque wrench? For bearing preload? *shudder*I'm sorry but quill stems …Torque wrench? For bearing preload? *shudder*I'm sorry but quill stems were killed off more than 20 years ago for good reason and I, for one, would reject a bike out of hand purely because of its presence.


I'm not sure you understand much about quill stems at all and you don't seem to understand quill stems have a lot more height adjustment than a threadless headset plus you shouldn't always mount spacers above the stem especially with carbon fibre with a threadless headset unless you buy the extended length top bolt and move the star nut down to where it's inline with the stem or at least that is what parktool state is the ideal position. The quill stem is rubbish for off road use and should never be used there but it's still good engineering in my opinion for a lower end road bike or leisure bike. Copper grease is typically used to make sure the quill stem works as it should and prevent it seizing. It also prevents against galvanic corrosion if any of the parts are aluminium and suppresses creaking noises. Despite the name copper grease is not really a grease or lubricant it is an anti-seize compound.

Also there are Decathlon bikes for general use with quill stems anyway which seems to be your favoured retailer so not sure why you are saying they were killed off 20 years ago. Quill stems are probably fitted to many more bikes sold in the world than threadless headsets and forks.

decathlon.co.uk/hop…tml
I understand the comments with regards the headset, a correctly adjusted one should pose no issue for a potential buyer, threaded headsets have been around for many years and work..
As for Decathlon bikes, I don't feel that the ones at this price point offer as much, or look half as nice..
bonzobanana26/06/2019 00:50

I'm not sure you understand much about quill stems at all and you don't …I'm not sure you understand much about quill stems at all and you don't seem to understand quill stems have a lot more height adjustment than a threadless headset plus you shouldn't always mount spacers above the stem especially with carbon fibre with a threadless headset unless you buy the extended length top bolt and move the star nut down to where it's inline with the stem or at least that is what parktool state is the ideal position. The quill stem is rubbish for off road use and should never be used there but it's still good engineering in my opinion for a lower end road bike or leisure bike. Copper grease is typically used to make sure the quill stem works as it should and prevent it seizing. It also prevents against galvanic corrosion if any of the parts are aluminium and suppresses creaking noises. Despite the name copper grease is not really a grease or lubricant it is an anti-seize compound.Also there are Decathlon bikes for general use with quill stems anyway which seems to be your favoured retailer so not sure why you are saying they were killed off 20 years ago. Quill stems are probably fitted to many more bikes sold in the world than threadless headsets and forks. https://www.decathlon.co.uk/hoprider-100-urban-hybrid-bike-id_8405477.html


Don't be so quick to claim, or dismiss knowledge, my friend.

In general, if you need to raise a stem by that much, there's a good chance that you've bought the wrong size bike in the first place. Not understanding that a threadless system is both quick and easy to setup is a poor argument for why a quill stem is superior. There are good reasons why you don't find them on any bikes that cost more than £2-300, with the one exception being certain types of touring bikes where a very, very high handlebar position generally precludes using a threadless steerer.

Not sure why you mentioned carbon steerers here as I wouldn't normally use star nuts here anyway and they are a few steps away from the sorts of bike being discussed in this thread. Otherwise, thank you for the lesson on greases. I know where to turn when I need some new lube!

FWIW, I am a keen cyclist and my one and only aim here is for people to actually buy bikes that they will enjoy riding, not ride once, complain about the terrible gears, wheels, brakes and then stick in the shed for 10 years until it gets skipped in the next clear out. I have said elsewhere (and I think you had a good rant at me there too) that cheap does not equate to good value and that I would recommend that those with a tight budget look to buy second hand where they are much more likely to get a decent bike, and perhaps learn a bit about how to maintain it properly!
daern26/06/2019 11:09

Don't be so quick to claim, or dismiss knowledge, my friend.In general, if …Don't be so quick to claim, or dismiss knowledge, my friend.In general, if you need to raise a stem by that much, there's a good chance that you've bought the wrong size bike in the first place. Not understanding that a threadless system is both quick and easy to setup is a poor argument for why a quill stem is superior. There are good reasons why you don't find them on any bikes that cost more than £2-300, with the one exception being certain types of touring bikes where a very, very high handlebar position generally precludes using a threadless steerer.Not sure why you mentioned carbon steerers here as I wouldn't normally use star nuts here anyway and they are a few steps away from the sorts of bike being discussed in this thread. Otherwise, thank you for the lesson on greases. I know where to turn when I need some new lube!FWIW, I am a keen cyclist and my one and only aim here is for people to actually buy bikes that they will enjoy riding, not ride once, complain about the terrible gears, wheels, brakes and then stick in the shed for 10 years until it gets skipped in the next clear out. I have said elsewhere (and I think you had a good rant at me there too) that cheap does not equate to good value and that I would recommend that those with a tight budget look to buy second hand where they are much more likely to get a decent bike, and perhaps learn a bit about how to maintain it properly!


I'd certainly agree with looking on Gumtree for example, but equally, if you don't know what you are looking at, it makes it difficult..
daern26/06/2019 11:09

Otherwise, thank you for the lesson on greases. I know where to turn when …Otherwise, thank you for the lesson on greases. I know where to turn when I need some new lube!


Copper grease isn't the ideal - its main benefit and why you see it used in the car industry is for its ability to cope with high temperatures.

On a bike, where suggested, you are better with a lithium or silicone based grease.

Another term for galvanic corrosion is bimetallic corrosion in combining two dissimilar metals. Using a grease with copper fragments in on Aluminium leaves you only one element away from actually doing the opposite of what has been suggested.
vileda_the_best26/06/2019 17:56

Copper grease isn't the ideal - its main benefit and why you see it used …Copper grease isn't the ideal - its main benefit and why you see it used in the car industry is for its ability to cope with high temperatures.On a bike, where suggested, you are better with a lithium or silicone based grease. Another term for galvanic corrosion is bimetallic corrosion in combining two dissimilar metals. Using a grease with copper fragments in on Aluminium leaves you only one element away from actually doing the opposite of what has been suggested.


Thanks, but it's ok. I think the sarcasm in my original reply got lost in the wind ;-)
daern26/06/2019 11:09

Don't be so quick to claim, or dismiss knowledge, my friend.In general, if …Don't be so quick to claim, or dismiss knowledge, my friend.In general, if you need to raise a stem by that much, there's a good chance that you've bought the wrong size bike in the first place. Not understanding that a threadless system is both quick and easy to setup is a poor argument for why a quill stem is superior. There are good reasons why you don't find them on any bikes that cost more than £2-300, with the one exception being certain types of touring bikes where a very, very high handlebar position generally precludes using a threadless steerer.Not sure why you mentioned carbon steerers here as I wouldn't normally use star nuts here anyway and they are a few steps away from the sorts of bike being discussed in this thread. Otherwise, thank you for the lesson on greases. I know where to turn when I need some new lube!FWIW, I am a keen cyclist and my one and only aim here is for people to actually buy bikes that they will enjoy riding, not ride once, complain about the terrible gears, wheels, brakes and then stick in the shed for 10 years until it gets skipped in the next clear out. I have said elsewhere (and I think you had a good rant at me there too) that cheap does not equate to good value and that I would recommend that those with a tight budget look to buy second hand where they are much more likely to get a decent bike, and perhaps learn a bit about how to maintain it properly!


I don't understand the logic of 2nd hand will be a quality bargain. This bike will appear on gumtree with a sales pitch that it cost £500 but only used once for a charity ride
kramer208826/06/2019 23:57

I don't understand the logic of 2nd hand will be a quality bargain. This …I don't understand the logic of 2nd hand will be a quality bargain. This bike will appear on gumtree with a sales pitch that it cost £500 but only used once for a charity ride


I wasn't meaning to buy this particular bike second-hand (unless you get it for a fiver or out of the skip at the local tip!), but rather a superior bike that was more expensive originally, that you might be able to pick up for a similar amount of money. e.g. you see plenty of Specialized Allez road bikes going for this sort of money that were £500+ originally. Providing you don't buy one that has been abused, you will certainly get a better bike for your money.
Edited by: "daern" 27th Jun
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