Miele T8860WP Tumble Dryer - Peter Tyson Appliances - £899 - Next Day Delivery
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Miele T8860WP Tumble Dryer - Peter Tyson Appliances - £899 - Next Day Delivery

23
Found 31st Mar 2013
I know this is expensive for a tumble dryer and you can buy one for a fifth of this price but if you are in the market for a top brand top spec machine that is supposedly built to last 20 years then this is a pretty good deal and £100 cheaper than the next closest rival I can find (co-op Electric). Price includes next day delivery to UK.

2/4/13 - John Lewis will Price Match this price from their Newcastle Branch...

Specs.

- Miele T8860WP Tumble Dryer
- The Miele T8860WP heat pump tumble dryer uses a refrigerent that is condensed by a compressor and passed through a closed circuit into a heat exchange unit where with the circulating drying air takes place. Because this transfer of energy is rapid and very efficient, energy consumption and running costs are about 46% lower than those on a conventional Miele condenser tumble dryer.
- The tumble dryer is fitted with a large capacity water container resulting in the appliance not having to be emptied as frequently, the container also has a practical spout making it easy to carry and empty without any spillage.
T8860WP has a indicator light which will illuminate letting you know when the condenser container needs emptied.
- Miele condenser dryers have a patented water outlet convenietly located at the back of the machine, can be set up to drain the condensed water directly away avoiding the need to empty the water container, it is easy to convert the machine back to using the container whenever you wish.
- The T8860WP tumble dryer is equipped with a 8 kg Miele patented honeycomb drum, which with its hexagonal structure creates air pockets to gently catch and cushion the laundry as it tumbles resulting in your clothing needing less ironing and more even drying results.
- The Miele T8860WP tumble dryer has drum reverse action that changes direction at irregular inetervals ensuring that the laundry is thoroughly dried and means your clothing does not roll into a ball.
- T8860WP has Miele`s Perfect dry system which provides uniformed drying results even with varying water quality. The residual moisture in the laundry is monitored by an electronic moisture censor which adjustes the drying time accordingly.
- Miele has cleverly designed sound insulation making the T8860WP tumble dryer extremely quiet when in operation.
- The T8860WP has Miele`s own enamel coating that looks good as new year after year protecting against corrosion and scratches plus has the added benefit of being colour & acid resitant and comes with a lifetime gaurantee.
- T8860WP tumble dryer has 2 easily accessable fluff filters that are simple and convenient to clean.
- Dimensions H85cm W59.5cm D59.6cm
- Free delivery (mon-Fri)
- T8826WP is guaranteed for 2 years (must be registered with Miele)

23 Comments

Miele always top 'Which?' magazine tests, good spot.

Original Poster

davewave

Miele always top 'Which?' magazine tests, good spot.



Thanks.. This one is also A Rated so saves you electric year on year. Over 10 years then the savings bring the overall cost down significantly.

Built to last 20 years - guaranteed for 2!! Hmm?

Buy a Bosch for 1/3 or the price.

We bought a mid-range Zanussi in 1988 and it's still going strong today. It cost less than £200 back then and has not needed a single repair or replacement part despite having had significant use over the years. I'm not recommending everyone buys Zanussi but just pointing out that £900 on a tumble dryer is plain silly, unless just just have the urge to name drop to the neighbours of course

Original Poster

useless_57

Built to last 20 years - guaranteed for 2!! Hmm? Buy a Bosch for 1/3 or … Built to last 20 years - guaranteed for 2!! Hmm? Buy a Bosch for 1/3 or the price. We bought a mid-range Zanussi in 1988 and it's still going strong today. It cost less than £200 back then and has not needed a single repair or replacement part despite having had significant use over the years. I'm not recommending everyone buys Zanussi but just pointing out that £900 on a tumble dryer is plain silly, unless just just have the urge to name drop to the neighbours of course



Thanks. What about running costs? A lot of the ones I have looked at are B or C Rated so use a lot more electric?

Not one to knock Miele.... their washing machines are excellent, but I've not found the quality of their other white goods to be as good as the washing machines.

I'd rather have a White Knight...
-£150
-Very reliable (my last one lasted for 12 years)
-UK made
-Won the Which? magazine award for reliability last year.

SweatySock

Thanks. What about running costs? A lot of the ones I have looked at are … Thanks. What about running costs? A lot of the ones I have looked at are B or C Rated so use a lot more electric?

The difference between each band, A, B, C is about 10%. The electricity cost is 15p per kW hour. The National Energy Cycle states about 1 kWhr per cycle. So this is about 15p per cycle on average. I use a 1.5 hr cycle so that is about 23p on a low temp wash (less than 40 degrees C). So the savings from a Grade B to Grade A is about 2p per wash. So if you wash twice a week. That is a saving of £2 per year on the electricity. Over 10 years that is a saving of £20 which is not as enormous as what salesmen and public relations manager will tell you (but then again public relations behave as sales people anyway). You can also cross check with my calculations using Moneywise
But the point of saving 10% is significant since the number of appliances per household adds up to significant savings. The differences between A, A+ , A+, A+++ is less than 10% on a law of dimishing returns.
Edited by: "splender" 31st Mar 2013

Original Poster

BigAde

-Won the Which? magazine award for reliability last year.



Equally, Which have a 'Don't Buy' White Knight as well. Different model (I would hope) but clearly their build quality is a little hit and miss. Get the right machine (any make) and you are quids in, get the wrong one and you have a problem. Now I guess that applies to Miele as well but have not noticed any appearing in the Which Don't Buy list.

Original Poster

splender

The difference between each band, A, B, C is about 10%. The electricity … The difference between each band, A, B, C is about 10%. The electricity cost is 15p per kW hour. The National Energy Cycle states about 1 kWhr per cycle. So this is about 15p per cycle on average. I use a 1.5 hr cycle so that is about 23p on a low temp wash (less than 40 degrees C). So the savings from a Grade B to Grade A is about 2p per wash. So if you wash twice a week. That is a saving of £2 per year on the electricity. Over 10 years that is a saving of £20 which is not as enormous as what salesmen and public relations manager will tell you (but then again public relations behave as sales people anyway). You can also cross check with my calculations using Moneywise But the point of saving 10% is significant since the number of appliances per household adds up to significant savings. The differences between A, A+ , A+, A+++ is less than 10% on a law of dimishing returns.



Slightly different perspective from Which (which.co.uk/hom…ts/). I need to do some more research... Also, wish I only used mine twice a week. It is normally on once a day...
Edited by: "SweatySock" 31st Mar 2013

whatsThePoint

for how many years did which test each device and I take it they used … for how many years did which test each device and I take it they used several of each model from every brand to get a balanced view?



As far as I know, it's based on actual customer feedback.

SweatySock

Thanks.. This one is also A Rated so saves you electric year on year. … Thanks.. This one is also A Rated so saves you electric year on year. Over 10 years then the savings bring the overall cost down significantly.

Your belief is moonshine! See my post and the URL links. But Miele are excellent.

By the way Bosch though much cheaper are built to last average of 4 years for washing machines. I wash 2 a week. But there is a cheap way to extend its life if you are a skilled DIYer. The parts which are likely to fail are the pump and the commutators for the electric motor. If you are a skilled DIY man then the Bosch original pump is about £50 as spare parts. OEM pump, just as good to my experience, is £25-£30. The carbon commutator or bushes costs £10? for a pair, so very cheap. After 4 years of use the carbon bushes was half worn (two washes per week approx.). There are extensive guides on the net and youtube video to tell you how to do this. You don't have to BING the exact model as all Bosch models have similar build but different quality and size of spare parts. The main thing is to be able to slide out the washing machine and tilt it 45 degree angle to work it from underneath. Prop the appliance up well when it is tilted. If you cannot DIY then you are falling into the product sales cycle strategy of Bosch since it is then more cost effective to buy new than to ask a paid workan to come out. The reason is that he will charge £60-£100 for the pump. £60 for call out and then a hourly rate of £50+/hr. So it is more cost effective to buy new with a warranty.

whatsThePoint

this makes it … this makes it clearerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union_energy_label



Good link, hadn't realised there were different scales for vented and condenser dryers... seems bizarre that you can't compare across types.

Original Poster

whatsThePoint

this makes it … this makes it clearerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union_energy_label



WhatsThePoint, thanks. Not sure it makes it clearer, my head is now spinning. I need to sit down in a dark corner and do some calculations but I based my assumption on the statement in on the Which page that they identified the difference between the best and worst was £60/year based on a drying load every two days. I know I use mine a lot more than that so the cost difference would jump further. I accept that this is a comparison between best and worst so savings shouldn't be that big but certainly need to think abit more before shelling out £899. Thanks again.
Edited by: "SweatySock" 31st Mar 2013

SweatySock

WhatsThePoint, thanks. Not sure it makes it clearer, my head is now … WhatsThePoint, thanks. Not sure it makes it clearer, my head is now spinning. I need to sit down in a dark corner and do some calculations but I based my assumption on the statement in on the Which page that they7 identified the difference between the best and worst was £60/year based on a drying load every two days. I know I use mine a lot more than that so the cost difference would jump further. I accept that this is a comparison between best and worst so savings shouldn't be that big but certainly need to think abit more before shelling out £899. Thanks again.



As long as you keep in mind that the electricity savings are only likely to be seen if your £899 dryer doesn't break down and require repair/replacement in that time. With only a 2 year warranty that should be noted as a risk.
Edited by: "BigAde" 31st Mar 2013

whatsThePoint

so I take it that would be feedback from people who have been buying … so I take it that would be feedback from people who have been buying cheap/which best buy items, not from people who buy without reading/responding to which so its more than a little bias



I really don't know... but then you don't know either, so it's hardly valid to be calling it biased based on that.

£900 to dry some clothes. What next a toaster at £400.

If I could afford to blow £900 on a tumble dryer I doubt that I would want it sat in my kitchen for 20 years.

steviecross

£900 to dry some clothes. What next a toaster at £400.


Why not?

happychappy

Why not?

£100 or £900 they just contain a drum and a heating element, you could spend £600 on a kettle but it would only boil water. Do people really spend £900 on a tumble dryer and if so why.

whatsThePoint

that's a bit like saying you can buy a car for £8k which is just 4 wheels … that's a bit like saying you can buy a car for £8k which is just 4 wheels and an engine and do 70mph, so why do some people spend over 100x that amount yet they can still only legally do 70mph on uk roads

I know but with a car you would get more comfort, faster speeds, built in satnav plus loads more goodies such as electric seats etc. Still my question is what more will this do than a 100 pound dryer

Original Poster

Have to admit, I thought this would go cold because of the cost and it's a Miele but are we not all missing the point here...? This is still a significant saving for this model of Miele. If someone was going to buy one anyway then this knocks a few quid off which I thought was the point of this site...? Can anyone point me to a cheaper price?

Not hot really. You can get this cheaper just by asking for discount. As for is this better than a cheap £100 dryer then stick to putting your clothes on the radiator to dry. Miele white goods in my opinion are second to none.

Original Poster

brisbrom

Not hot really. You can get this cheaper just by asking for discount. As … Not hot really. You can get this cheaper just by asking for discount. As for is this better than a cheap £100 dryer then stick to putting your clothes on the radiator to dry. Miele white goods in my opinion are second to none.



Where do you 'negotiate' your discounts? Not being sarcastic but have not known UK shops to haggle.

SweatySock

Where do you 'negotiate' your discounts? Not being sarcastic but have not … Where do you 'negotiate' your discounts? Not being sarcastic but have not known UK shops to haggle.



Sorry for not replying earlier.
I just tell the shop manager wherever I go what I am willing to pay for a specific item and see if they are willing to match it. Honestly, if you don't ask you don't get. I got a Miele washer dryer for £850 when it was on sale at £1150 in a Euronics store.
You don't have to try to be a wide boy, just be straight forward and tell them you have the cash in your back pocket and you want THAT item.
I have done it many times and if they don't want to drop the price you just calmly go to leave without saying "ah well, your loss" or anything like that and try it at the next shop that sells the item. I mean, what have YOU got to lose by asking, absolutely nothing.
The list of shops where I've asked for discount is very long and probably 30% of them are now out of business but I can assure you, they never sold me anything that I knew they'd make a loss on.
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