Miele TKB640 T1 Heat Pump Tumble Dryer £749 @ Miele
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Miele TKB640 T1 Heat Pump Tumble Dryer £749 @ Miele

14
Found 27th Sep 2017Edited by:"BufferOverflow"
On clearance direct with Miele with free delivery and install included.
£200 cheaper than other retailers including John Lewis.

Newer model has identical specs except a marginally more economical motor for £1150
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14 Comments
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deleted1032520
Link doesn't work.

Only white available?
Cheers; link updated. Yes only in white
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deleted1032520
My wife embarked upon a voyage of having all new appliances in the utility in graphite grey, which was all well and good until they started to die.
Managed to replace washing machine with a Samsung in a similar colour but really struggling to find a matching drier.
I've got this and it is really slow at drying compared to my old dryer. It is cheaper to run and gentle on clothes but if you've got a lot of family washing to do it will take a while.
kooks6559 m ago

I've got this and it is really slow at drying compared to my old dryer. It …I've got this and it is really slow at drying compared to my old dryer. It is cheaper to run and gentle on clothes but if you've got a lot of family washing to do it will take a while.

Was your previous one also a heat pump one? They do tend to take longer to dry
loofer1 h, 3 m ago

Was your previous one also a heat pump one? They do tend to take longer to …Was your previous one also a heat pump one? They do tend to take longer to dry


No it was a bosch vented one I'd had for years. Luckily my kids have grown up now so there is not as much washing to do, with my last one it would take about an hour to dry a load but this is about two hours, I still rate it but I would have struggled years ago with school uniforms and sports kits.
I notice that this model says it uses approx 1,940 watts on a standard cotton full load. Anyone know if this is correct?

My very basic Hoover vented dryer takes 60 mins to dry a full load and is rated at 2,200 watts.

I know heat pump dryers are supposed to be more economical however based on the numbers above suggests I would only save 13% energy - so not very much.

Anyone any ideas if this is a fair comparison?
gary33354 m ago

I notice that this model says it uses approx 1,940 watts on a standard …I notice that this model says it uses approx 1,940 watts on a standard cotton full load. Anyone know if this is correct? My very basic Hoover vented dryer takes 60 mins to dry a full load and is rated at 2,200 watts. I know heat pump dryers are supposed to be more economical however based on the numbers above suggests I would only save 13% energy - so not very much.Anyone any ideas if this is a fair comparison?


Depending when and where you use your dryer you may benefit from the returning hot air, rather than heating outdside up.
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deleted1032520
pipehippy7 h, 19 m ago

Depending when and where you use your dryer you may benefit from the …Depending when and where you use your dryer you may benefit from the returning hot air, rather than heating outdside up.


If you don't mind damp and mould
Thanks, I’ve gone for one. My old vented Bosch died some time ago, and I’ve been struggling on without a dryer, waiting for an offer like this.

gary3338 h, 33 m ago

I notice that this model says it uses approx 1,940 watts on a standard …I notice that this model says it uses approx 1,940 watts on a standard cotton full load. Anyone know if this is correct? My very basic Hoover vented dryer takes 60 mins to dry a full load and is rated at 2,200 watts. I know heat pump dryers are supposed to be more economical however based on the numbers above suggests I would only save 13% energy - so not very much.Anyone any ideas if this is a fair comparison?



I’d just like to make a slight correction, energy consumption figures are given in kilowatt hours (kWh). Watts is a measure of instantaneous energy, also called power. To get energy you have to multiply this by time. I’m mentioning this just in case the figure you’ve given for your Hoover dryer is in fact in Watts and is therefore the maximum power it can draw from the wall socket and not the energy consumption per load.

To compare figures for the energy consumption per load, you also have to compare each dryer’s full load. If you look at the Miele T 8722, which appears to be Miele’s only current domestic vented model, that has an energy consumption per load of 4.01kWh. That’s over 80% more than the figure you’ve given for your basic Hoover dryer. However, the full load for the Miele T 8722 is 7kg. If the full load of your Hoover dryer is only 4kg, around 80% less, that would give them approximately equal efficiencies.

The full load for the Miele TKB 640 WP Eco is 8kg. So, that’s potentially twice the load for that 12% less energy. Of course, these figures don’t give you values for partial loads. A half-load should use roughly half the energy, but it won’t be exactly half the energy and could be a quite a bit more. For very light loads, the efficiency will be much worse. Imagine drying a single pair of socks in any sort of electric dryer. Ok, Japan briefly flirted with microwave clothes dryers, and they can efficiently dry a single pair of particularly small socks.

You can think of heat pump (in German Wärmepumpe, hence the WP in the product name) technology as being to the old vented dryer as LED light bulbs are to their old incandescent counterparts.
sisyphus12 h, 47 m ago

You can think of heat pump (in German Wärmepumpe, hence the WP in the …You can think of heat pump (in German Wärmepumpe, hence the WP in the product name) technology as being to the old vented dryer as LED light bulbs are to their old incandescent counterparts.


Not really though.

LED bulbs come on immediately, and light the room just as well (or better) than old school light bulbs, saving you 80% energy.

By contrast, Heat pump tumble dryers are far, FAR slower than regular machines, often taking 4 hours rather than 1 hour to dry a load. So other than saving energy they work worse than the old tech. And the savings in terms of energy are far less than LED vs Incandescent - between 25 and 50% rather than 80%.

I myself just bought currys.co.uk/gbu…tml for £379 + 2% quidco . I realise it's an inferior brand and so not a fair comparison, but even if the heat pump miele saves me 50% energy it'll take years to pay the difference. I'd rather buy the AEG, save the money now, and buy the future tech in say 2027 when it's had a chance to mature.
sisyphus13 h, 12 m ago

Thanks, I’ve gone for one. My old vented Bosch died some time ago, and I …Thanks, I’ve gone for one. My old vented Bosch died some time ago, and I’ve been struggling on without a dryer, waiting for an offer like this.I’d just like to make a slight correction, energy consumption figures are given in kilowatt hours (kWh). Watts is a measure of instantaneous energy, also called power. To get energy you have to multiply this by time. I’m mentioning this just in case the figure you’ve given for your Hoover dryer is in fact in Watts and is therefore the maximum power it can draw from the wall socket and not the energy consumption per load.To compare figures for the energy consumption per load, you also have to compare each dryer’s full load. If you look at the Miele T 8722, which appears to be Miele’s only current domestic vented model, that has an energy consumption per load of 4.01kWh. That’s over 80% more than the figure you’ve given for your basic Hoover dryer. However, the full load for the Miele T 8722 is 7kg. If the full load of your Hoover dryer is only 4kg, around 80% less, that would give them approximately equal efficiencies.The full load for the Miele TKB 640 WP Eco is 8kg. So, that’s potentially twice the load for that 12% less energy. Of course, these figures don’t give you values for partial loads. A half-load should use roughly half the energy, but it won’t be exactly half the energy and could be a quite a bit more. For very light loads, the efficiency will be much worse. Imagine drying a single pair of socks in any sort of electric dryer. Ok, Japan briefly flirted with microwave clothes dryers, and they can efficiently dry a single pair of particularly small socks.You can think of heat pump (in German Wärmepumpe, hence the WP in the product name) technology as being to the old vented dryer as LED light bulbs are to their old incandescent counterparts.


Thank you for the the input it is appreciated. For reference My Hoover dryer is a 6kg model, and often gets overfilled as the washing machine is a 8kg model. It manages to dry whatever I put in, and dries in 60mins. This isn't a fluke either, as the original dryer I had (which was recalled due to fire safety) had same performance even after 8 years. If I do a half load (half of my washing machine so 4kg)the dryer goes on for 40mins.

I am assuming the max my dryer can use in kwh based on it being a 60min dry is 2.2KWH. This still leads to feel we are being mislead by manufactures slightly that we wont save very much having a heat pump dryer.

I thought the Miele used equiv. of 1.9kWh total for it's 2 hour spin using up to 1,100w, this compares to my total of 2.2kWh (which as you point out maybe a little lower) for it's full spin of 1 hour at 2,200w
Edited by: "gary333" 29th Sep 2017
I've just looked at the instruction model for the dryer I have. Hotpoint (must have been the last one that was a Hoover that they replaced First Edition FETV 60).

The manual says a full dry time is 107mins. As anyone who has one of these dryers knows if you left it on this long the clothes would be on fire or 1/4 of the size. Makes me wonder if the manufactures are playing silly beggars to encourage people to go for Heat Pump as 107mins is almost double the amount of time a full load actually takes.
Gone now.
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