Milwaukee 12V Pro grade Combi Drill - 1.3kg  ! Case & 2 x 2Ah Li-ion batteries - 3 Years warranty - £99.98 delivered or collect in store @ toolstation
200°Expired

Milwaukee 12V Pro grade Combi Drill - 1.3kg ! Case & 2 x 2Ah Li-ion batteries - 3 Years warranty - £99.98 delivered or collect in store @ toolstation

36
Found 4th Nov 2014
Ridiculous price for this particular product. Professional grade, highly efficient combi drill. It used to be sold for £170+ (still at this price in most places). 3 years warranty, universal M12 battery platform (plenty of power for a 12V - more than 18V DIY- dedicated drills). Ultra light (for a Milwaukee) and maneuverable.


10 mm single sleeve chuck for quick change of a complete range of accessories
18 stage torque adjustment plus additional drilling for maximum flexibility
REDLINK™overload protection electronics in tool and battery pack deliver best in class system durability
Slimline soft grip handle
Built in LED light illuminates the work surfaces
Fuel gauge displays remaining battery charge state

No load speed gear 1 (rpm) 0 - 400
No load speed gear 2 (rpm) 0 - 1500
Max. torque (Nm) 32
Voltage (V) 12
Battery pack capacity (Ah) 2.0
Battery type Li-ion
Max. percussion rate (bpm) 22,500
Supplied in Kitbox
Charger supplied 40 min
No. of batteries supplied 2
Article Number 4933441210
Speed settings 2
Weight with battery pack (kg)1.3
Max. drilling steel (mm) 10
Max. drilling wood (mm) 22
Max. drilling masonry (mm) 7
Chuck capacity (mm) 10

36 Comments

These are foxy looking tools. Shame I am on the Makita band camp, otherwise I would have jumped at this.

Banned

crazymonkey

These are foxy looking tools. Shame I am on the Makita band camp, … These are foxy looking tools. Shame I am on the Makita band camp, otherwise I would have jumped at this.

I switched to Milwaukee fuel tools from Makita and am very impressed, good tools.

I got 2 of these for work with th 3 amp batteries and they are brilliant loads of torque and last around 2 days of continuous use, excellent brand excellent deal hot from me. Don't let the 12volt put you off these are little work horses.
Edited by: "polo03" 4th Nov 2014

1apple

I switched to Milwaukee fuel tools from Makita and am very impressed, … I switched to Milwaukee fuel tools from Makita and am very impressed, good tools.



I just can't justify parting with money until I have got full value out of the tools I already own

Original Poster

crazymonkey

I just can't justify parting with money until I have got full value out … I just can't justify parting with money until I have got full value out of the tools I already own



I take it's easier to get full value out of the tools whilst you are a trade and use wide range of cordless products with interchangeable accu . I usually change the tools when batteries fail and do not even try to stay loyal to one particular company.Yet, I never buy the top end stuff that would be worthwhile to spend hundreds on servicing or new high capacity batteries and mainly use corded tools.



Edited by: "7777777" 5th Nov 2014

Original Poster

http://cdn.toolstation.com/images/141020-UK/800/18711.jpg

amazing value for money! HEAT!

This looks a bit like my Metabo 10.8V - total quality. I am a DIY user , but I have made the mistake before of not checking the charge time and weight of these things . This passes both - ordered.

Am reserving voting on this. On paper it doesn't seem such a good deal to me. The batteries (12v x 2Ah) are only 24Wh. If the voltage was 18V then they'd only need to be 1.33Ah to be the equivalent capacity, which is quite easy to find.

Also the torque rating at 32Nm isn't particularly good (actually quite poor for a "professional" drill). If you were serious about power tools then you'd probably want >>40Nm.

I think there are more powerful drills available for this money. I suspect most of the 18V Lion packages which pop up on HUKD would outperform it on paper. That said though I have no idea how reliable, lightweight or well balanced this is - which are all big considerations. All I'm trying to do is point out that anyone wanting loads of torque/battery life may feel a little short changed by this model.

I don't really need this but bought it anyway Cheers - heat!

qyestionmark

Am reserving voting on this. On paper it doesn't seem such a good deal to … Am reserving voting on this. On paper it doesn't seem such a good deal to me. The batteries (12v x 2Ah) are only 24Wh. If the voltage was 18V then they'd only need to be 1.33Ah to be the equivalent capacity, which is quite easy to find.Also the torque rating at 32Nm isn't particularly good (actually quite poor for a "professional" drill). If you were serious about power tools then you'd probably want >>40Nm.I think there are more powerful drills available for this money. I suspect most of the 18V Lion packages which pop up on HUKD would outperform it on paper. That said though I have no idea how reliable, lightweight or well balanced this is - which are all big considerations. All I'm trying to do is point out that anyone wanting loads of torque/battery life may feel a little short changed by this model.



You are wrong, Milwaukee 12V beats many 18V devices.
Edited by: "boolsheat" 5th Nov 2014

This a super hot price, Never seen this so cheap, And I have looked for many years.

You are wrong.



On so many levels.

This is hot.... 3 years warranty too....quality kit...

How does this compare to the Hitachi 18v at this price point? However, I appreciate the lesser size and weight of the Milwaukee may be preferred by some.

screwfix.com/p/h…968

Thanks to the OP for the heads up, no brainer for me to order at this price. Milwaukee gear is second to none in my opinion.

sabreliner

Thanks to the OP for the heads up, no brainer for me to order at this … Thanks to the OP for the heads up, no brainer for me to order at this price. Milwaukee gear is second to none in my opinion.



Agreed, Milwaukee gear really is the best out there now.

themorgatron

Agreed, Milwaukee gear really is the best out there now.



Agreed to a certain price point, hilti the best I've come across but extremely expensive

Stu C

How does this compare to the Hitachi 18v at this price point? However, I … How does this compare to the Hitachi 18v at this price point? However, I appreciate the lesser size and weight of the Milwaukee may be preferred by some.http://www.screwfix.com/p/hitachi-dv18dgl-jc-18v-1-5ah-li-ion-cordless-combi-drill/8652f?_requestid=255968



That Hitachi is a much more powerful drill - at 55Nm (vs 32Nm) - and the battery packs should last >10% longer - at 27Wh (vs 24Wh). Hitachi is also generally well regarded in the trade.

btw, before comparing weights I think I'd want to double check whether the Milwaukee figure quoted is with or without the battery. ;-)

Potentially the higher voltage packs (in the Hitachi) will last better than just the difference between the capacities. Most of the losses in the power control electronics and in the motor are related to the current you need (so called "I squared R" losses). The higher voltage doesn't just make the drill more powerful it also makes it more efficient - (i.e. less current needed for the same power output so less losses). But no doubt someone who doesn't really understand how these things work will say otherwise.

Now, again that isn't intended to diss this deal. If you like Milwaukee (and they do make good stuff) then this seems like a great price. It's just that this drill is a little light on torque so won't suit everyone. Just compare the stated drilling capacities on these two drills and you get the idea.

Very Good price for this item.




Ordered and voted HOT.

proctor1

Agreed to a certain price point, hilti the best I've come across but … Agreed to a certain price point, hilti the best I've come across but extremely expensive



Agreed! I tend to forget about Hilti just because they are so much more expensive.

I just had a call saying it's out of stock for delivery, but managed to reserve the last one in Shrewsbury.

I think some people are getting a little confused with this driver and missing the point. It's not REALLY a cordless drill in the traditional sense of the term. Think of of more as a very powerful cordless screwdriver.

I have the Bosch version of this, GSR 10.8v, similar size and power. It's probably the best cordless powertool that I've ever purchased, and gets used more than any other. Very small and light, but powerful enough to drive a 6" screw into timber without drilling a hole first.

Original Poster

qyestionmark

That Hitachi is a much more powerful drill - at 55Nm (vs 32Nm) - and the … That Hitachi is a much more powerful drill - at 55Nm (vs 32Nm) - and the battery packs should last >10% longer - at 27Wh (vs 24Wh). Hitachi is also generally well regarded in the trade.btw, before comparing weights I think I'd want to double check whether the Milwaukee figure quoted is with or without the battery. ;-)Potentially the higher voltage packs (in the Hitachi) will last better than just the difference between the capacities. Most of the losses in the power control electronics and in the motor are related to the current you need (so called "I squared R" losses). The higher voltage doesn't just make the drill more powerful it also makes it more efficient - (i.e. less current needed for the same power output so less losses). But no doubt someone who doesn't really understand how these things work will say otherwise.Now, again that isn't intended to diss this deal. If you like Milwaukee (and they do make good stuff) then this seems like a great price. It's just that this drill is a little light on torque so won't suit everyone. Just compare the stated drilling capacities on these two drills and you get the idea.



Hitachi makes very good drills, however they are not in the same league with Milwaukee - price, reputation as well as quality wise. They used to have a lot of problems with life of batteries, chucks etc. They are usually good value tools and seem to try hard to win the market back, though.

The tools should not to be assessed by the specification only - balance, finish, service, longevity are as much, if not more important. I do not believe that Nm means the same for all the manufacturers, if so for e.g. Ryobi impact driver having allegedly 220Nm would deliver more than the high end Makitas or DeWalts. Ryobi is decent but really that better than the top players ??? The paper spec is for bragging DIY users, the professionals take into account much more than this.
You cannot just compare, like for like 12V with 18V and Screwfix-exclusive Hitachi with rather higher end Milwaukee by summing up list of features only ! Milwaukee is usually heavy, maybe because the good materials weight...

I thought my 18V Li-Ion Black & Decker was good ...until I could use for a while my brother's Festool . Believe me, paper-wise it was not anything impressive but I was genuinely impressed.
Edited by: "7777777" 5th Nov 2014

fantastic drills - I'm sure it has a brushless motor too.

Original Poster

FFX stocks the 2 x 3Ah version of the drill @ £131

7777777

FFX stocks the 2 x 3Ah version of the drill @ £131



I don't think that comes with a box or charger. also the batteries are quite a bit more cumbersome in that version.

Original Poster

themorgatron

I don't think that comes with a box or charger. also the batteries are … I don't think that comes with a box or charger. also the batteries are quite a bit more cumbersome in that version.



They do

2 x C12BX 3.0Ah Li-Ion Batteries
C12C - Charger
Milwaukee Carry Case


I agree, however according to Milwaukee milwaukeetool.eu/pow…pd/ the higher capacity battery rises the max torque

7777777

They do 2 x C12BX 3.0Ah Li-Ion BatteriesC12C - ChargerMilwaukee Carry … They do 2 x C12BX 3.0Ah Li-Ion BatteriesC12C - ChargerMilwaukee Carry CaseI agree, however according to Milwaukee http://www.milwaukeetool.eu/powertools/cordless/c12-pd/ the higher capacity battery rises the max torque



Sorry it didn't say that on the FFX site, seems like a great price if you want a bit larger batteries.

I also didn't realise the size Ah battery can raise the torque, I thought it was just a measure of the 'capacity of the fuel tank' so to speak.

The one disappointing thing is a 40 minute charge time, a bit on the slow time (60 mins with the 3Ah).

Why expired? I've just ordered one from my local toolstation. Still some at other stores

themorgatron

Sorry it didn't say that on the FFX site, seems like a great price if you … Sorry it didn't say that on the FFX site, seems like a great price if you want a bit larger batteries.I also didn't realise the size Ah battery can raise the torque, I thought it was just a measure of the 'capacity of the fuel tank' so to speak.The one disappointing thing is a 40 minute charge time, a bit on the slow time (60 mins with the 3Ah).



FWIW - I pretty much agree with all of what you said in your previous post. Headline specs can be misleading. To get a real feel for what a tool is like you'd have to look at the torque curve against speed and against load - and neither is a substitute for actually using it. But the max torque figure can tell you a lot. In that respect it's no different to a car engine. The Horsepower will tell you something, but the maximum torque figure (at RPM) will tell you a lot more. WRT to impact drivers I completely agree that those figures can be hugely misleading - you are basically trying to measure an impulsive force, and the time interval you look at has a huge influence on what torque figure you end up with.

And yes the battery capacity will have a bearing on the torque and power that can be extracted from it. In effect a larger capacity battery is like several smaller capacity cells all wired in parallel. When you do that the source impedance drops, so the maximum current you can draw increases. There are actually several additive benefits to having as high a "C" (capacity) pack as you can. In other words a 3Ah pack will actually give better than 2x the results of a 1.5Ah pack. The extra capacity will not only have a lower impedance, but by discharging at a slower rate will actually supply more of the stored charge more efficiently.

Finally, whilst trying to find a more detailed spec for this drill I noticed that yes the motor is brushless (another positive), but I couldn't find any confirmation that the gearbox was all-metal. A number of Milwaukee power tools state this, but I haven't found anything for this model saying that. Quite a lot of even good brand power tools these days use some plastic components in their gearboxes. Whilst I would hope Milwaukee would not do that, the light weight and low torque figure suggest it might. It would be another thing I'd want to check before buying.

Original Poster

qyestionmark

FWIW - I pretty much agree with all of what you said in your previous … FWIW - I pretty much agree with all of what you said in your previous post. Headline specs can be misleading. To get a real feel for what a tool is like you'd have to look at the torque curve against speed and against load - and neither is a substitute for actually using it. But the max torque figure can tell you a lot. In that respect it's no different to a car engine. The Horsepower will tell you something, but the maximum torque figure (at RPM) will tell you a lot more. WRT to impact drivers I completely agree that those figures can be hugely misleading - you are basically trying to measure an impulsive force, and the time interval you look at has a huge influence on what torque figure you end up with.And yes the battery capacity will have a bearing on the torque and power that can be extracted from it. In effect a larger capacity battery is like several smaller capacity cells all wired in parallel. When you do that the source impedance drops, so the maximum current you can draw increases. There are actually several additive benefits to having as high a "C" (capacity) pack as you can. In other words a 3Ah pack will actually give better than 2x the results of a 1.5Ah pack. The extra capacity will not only have a lower impedance, but by discharging at a slower rate will actually supply more of the stored charge more efficiently.Finally, whilst trying to find a more detailed spec for this drill I noticed that yes the motor is brushless (another positive), but I couldn't find any confirmation that the gearbox was all-metal. A number of Milwaukee power tools state this, but I haven't found anything for this model saying that. Quite a lot of even good brand power tools these days use some plastic components in their gearboxes. Whilst I would hope Milwaukee would not do that, the light weight and low torque figure suggest it might. It would be another thing I'd want to check before buying.



The gearbox is all metal and the weight is not actually that low (very light for a Milwaukee drill, though).
I do have an impression that you are trying to prove me wrong but that's all right, I am a very patient man

Geety

Why expired? I've just ordered one from my local toolstation. Still some … Why expired? I've just ordered one from my local toolstation. Still some at other stores



Because if we unexpire it , people will complain and send wave of cold votes for not having this available locally. It's out of stock online and almost unavailable in store..

Edited by: "7777777" 5th Nov 2014

I've picked up mine from my local branch. The drill is heavy for its size, but the whole package in its case feels very portable. It is very similar to my Metabo in build quality as far as I can see - ie top quality.

Order cancelled without letting me know. Usual crap - I would have been waiting in all day for delivery.

Didn't really need it anyway so not too bothered about not getting one.
Edited by: "stanno" 6th Nov 2014

I dont think this has a brushless motor - checking on the Milwaukee web site it explicitly states brushless for other drills, but not for this one.

mange

I dont think this has a brushless motor - checking on the Milwaukee web … I dont think this has a brushless motor - checking on the Milwaukee web site it explicitly states brushless for other drills, but not for this one.



You're right it's not brushless, only the FUEL versions are.

I picked mine up yesterday. Don't think it's very well weighted - far too top heavy for prolonged use, I think my 18v feels much more balanced. I will be returning mine.

I canceled my order, and paid the extra 30+ from fxx for the 3.0ah
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