Mini Ultra-thin Civilian Walkie Talkie - £12.73 @ Banggood
406°Expired

Mini Ultra-thin Civilian Walkie Talkie - £12.73 @ Banggood

49
Found 17th Aug 2017
I just found this walkie talkie price drop a lot today. This can be used for driving and hotel.

Available for 2 plug: EU plug and US plug

Features:
Mini size slim.
Built-in flashlight function, listing function, radio function, scan function, alarm function, keyboard lock function.
20 memory channels, voice prompts and electricity reminder.
Charger connector and Andrews phone interface can be universal.
Community Updates
Top comments
gavin11 h, 3 m ago

For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in …For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in the UK without either a UK Simple license (£75 for 5 years) or both users having at least a foundation level Radio Ham license.The only license free option in the UK is the PMR446 series, this is too powerful at 2W (PMR is limited to .5W) and it does not have the preset and unchangeable frequency's that the PMR license required.And Yes I fully understand that being caught is unlikely, but best poeple know these are not legal in the UK up front.


Thanks for sharing, I wasn't really interested in buying these until I read this!
'two sugars please'

'roger that'
For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in the UK without either a UK Simple license (£75 for 5 years) or both users having at least a foundation level Radio Ham license.

The only license free option in the UK is the PMR446 series, this is too powerful at 2W (PMR is limited to .5W) and it does not have the preset and unchangeable frequency's that the PMR license required.

And Yes I fully understand that being caught is unlikely, but best poeple know these are not legal in the UK up front.
I_SHOULD_COCO1 h, 19 m ago

These are Baofeng, which is a recognised brand in hand helds


Before reading the rest of your sentence, I thought Baofeng was some kind of new trendy word for cack. .
49 Comments
These are Baofeng, which is a recognised brand in hand helds
I'm guessing these work better in pairs... so need to purchase 2 of the blighters.
I_SHOULD_COCO1 h, 19 m ago

These are Baofeng, which is a recognised brand in hand helds


Before reading the rest of your sentence, I thought Baofeng was some kind of new trendy word for cack. .
Why do I get the impression the OP is connected to BangGood somehow?
For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in the UK without either a UK Simple license (£75 for 5 years) or both users having at least a foundation level Radio Ham license.

The only license free option in the UK is the PMR446 series, this is too powerful at 2W (PMR is limited to .5W) and it does not have the preset and unchangeable frequency's that the PMR license required.

And Yes I fully understand that being caught is unlikely, but best poeple know these are not legal in the UK up front.
99% of the container ships from china contain "illegal" stuff... this isnt a children's forum.
gavin11 h, 3 m ago

For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in …For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in the UK without either a UK Simple license (£75 for 5 years) or both users having at least a foundation level Radio Ham license.The only license free option in the UK is the PMR446 series, this is too powerful at 2W (PMR is limited to .5W) and it does not have the preset and unchangeable frequency's that the PMR license required.And Yes I fully understand that being caught is unlikely, but best poeple know these are not legal in the UK up front.


Thanks for sharing, I wasn't really interested in buying these until I read this!
Why would I want to connect an interface to Andrew's phone?
The frequency displayed on the handset is not covered by the uk simple licence which only covers 15 preset frequencies 407 is not one of them .
Also the ham licence does not cover 407 either
I'm stumped, in the age of mobile phones and wide coverage - why?
rhinopaul3 h, 0 m ago

Before reading the rest of your sentence, I thought Baofeng was some kind …Before reading the rest of your sentence, I thought Baofeng was some kind of new trendy word for cack. .


It is now.
gavin11 h, 18 m ago

For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in …For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in the UK without either a UK Simple license (£75 for 5 years) or both users having at least a foundation level Radio Ham license.The only license free option in the UK is the PMR446 series, this is too powerful at 2W (PMR is limited to .5W) and it does not have the preset and unchangeable frequency's that the PMR license required.And Yes I fully understand that being caught is unlikely, but best poeple know these are not legal in the UK up front.



Very useful info. Thanks. The specs say 5W not 2W?

Probably asking too much at this price but don't suppose comms is encrypted in any way
'two sugars please'

'roger that'
luckylad5727 m ago

The frequency displayed on the handset is not covered by the uk simple …The frequency displayed on the handset is not covered by the uk simple licence which only covers 15 preset frequencies 407 is not one of them .



I was trying not to be too specific so it wasn't a long post. I would assume if you knew enough to have a UK simple or ham license you; know what frequencies you could legally use.

The radios can be set to anything between 400 and 470, there are three frequencies these could be set to in order to comply with UK Simple license terms, and Amatuer radio license holders could use channels between 430 and 440MHz, with a restriction of not using 431 to 432 within 100KM of Charring Cross station.

And I think 407Mhz is one of those frequencies that are primarily assigned to the MOD, with a few civilian exceptions.....
littletime24 m ago

I'm stumped, in the age of mobile phones and wide coverage - why?



Because walkie talkes tend to have a longer battery life and are free to run once you've bought the devices and any licence..
Edited by: "gavin1" 17th Aug 2017
littletime28 m ago

I'm stumped, in the age of mobile phones and wide coverage - why?


Many businesses need 'instant' communication between staff, ie no waiting for your phone to dial theres plus the time they take to answer (if their hands are free). Walkies are still one of the most efficient ways of coordinating staff, particularly on live events.
Edited by: "Noddydog" 17th Aug 2017
littletime41 m ago

I'm stumped, in the age of mobile phones and wide coverage - why?



Useful when trekking with friends perhaps? Not everywhere can receive a mobile signal.
greenant36 m ago

Very useful info. Thanks. The specs say 5W not 2W?Probably asking too much …Very useful info. Thanks. The specs say 5W not 2W?Probably asking too much at this price but don't suppose comms is encrypted in any way



The PMR446 specs say the radio output should be 0.5W I think the font in use made the point before the 5 almost invisible...

And no you will not get encryption at this price, if you want to use Analog radio you need to go either to "proper" brands such as Motorola who made encryption boards, or go to the mid range digital sets. Usually you have to stay with the same brand if you want to use encryption, and depending on the brand and type of encrption it may be easily defeated.
Not knowing a thing about walkie talkies, could two be used allowing two cyclist to freely communicate?
Also not knowing anything about walkie talkies... would these work inline with existing UK products? Before you ask, I dont know the frequency/channel.. but some friends just bought some whilst they're bumbling around in their large plot of land and this would be the perfect item to mess with them...
forcedv18 m ago

Not knowing a thing about walkie talkies, could two be used allowing two …Not knowing a thing about walkie talkies, could two be used allowing two cyclist to freely communicate?



Yes for something like cycling you really need headset and VOX ability, which means start transmitting when the radio detects your voice so you can keep your hands on the handle bars.

However unless you very far apart I'd say use the standard UK PMR446 model radios to stay legal. PMR446's will work over a few 100 meters, up to 5KM in open country (although to be honest you'll never get that range)
Werdna1 h, 53 m ago

Thanks for sharing, I wasn't really interested in buying these until I …Thanks for sharing, I wasn't really interested in buying these until I read this!


Me neither, but now I know they are 4 times more powerful than a std. PMR I'm well interested!
adam_100116 m ago

Also not knowing anything about walkie talkies... would these work inline …Also not knowing anything about walkie talkies... would these work inline with existing UK products? Before you ask, I dont know the frequency/channel.. but some friends just bought some whilst they're bumbling around in their large plot of land and this would be the perfect item to mess with them...



Hard to say. You'd need to find what frequency they use,

A lot of people buy these cheap Chinese imports and never change them from the frequency they come from the factory on. Some of the Baofengs are double band models and if they have those, they may be using a band this cannot transmit / receive on.

They could also have bought low end digital versions, This is analog and while it will pick up the signal it would not be able to convert it into sound so it would problaby just sound like white noise,or a wierd tone, not something we humans can understand.
gavin13 h, 19 m ago

For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in …For anyone thinking of buying these they would be illegal to use here in the UK without either a UK Simple license (£75 for 5 years) or both users having at least a foundation level Radio Ham license.The only license free option in the UK is the PMR446 series, this is too powerful at 2W (PMR is limited to .5W) and it does not have the preset and unchangeable frequency's that the PMR license required.And Yes I fully understand that being caught is unlikely, but best poeple know these are not legal in the UK up front.


Most baofeng radios can be programmed easily and simply locked to PMR, it doesn't need to be a manufacturers lock from my understanding you can simply do it in software. All the Baofeng's I've used have had the output power being pretty easy to operate. I've got a set of UHF baofengs for training cadets and I've split them at full power on out MOD frequencies and 0.5W at a selection of PMR. It's not too much of an issue as we have an MOD issued operators license so not subject to amateur rules, but it's easy to stay within with most of the baofengs with a bit of programming.

Also they aren't inherently illegal, you can own a radio, any radio you want, you don't require a license. It's operating it that requires licensing or qualification unless you reprogramme it to comply.
littletime2 h, 13 m ago

I'm stumped, in the age of mobile phones and wide coverage - why?


derp
gavin156 m ago

Hard to say. You'd need to find what frequency they use, A lot of …Hard to say. You'd need to find what frequency they use, A lot of people buy these cheap Chinese imports and never change them from the frequency they come from the factory on. Some of the Baofengs are double band models and if they have those, they may be using a band this cannot transmit / receive on. They could also have bought low end digital versions, This is analog and while it will pick up the signal it would not be able to convert it into sound so it would problaby just sound like white noise,or a wierd tone, not something we humans can understand.



Thanks for that Gavin! I may hold off then, as it does sound a bit square peg round hole Cheers for the reply on a very vague, and somewhat utterly pointless question though!
smckirdy1 h, 1 m ago

Most baofeng radios can be programmed easily and simply locked to PMR, it …Most baofeng radios can be programmed easily and simply locked to PMR, it doesn't need to be a manufacturers lock from my understanding you can simply do it in software. All the Baofeng's I've used have had the output power being pretty easy to operate. I've got a set of UHF baofengs for training cadets and I've split them at full power on out MOD frequencies and 0.5W at a selection of PMR. It's not too much of an issue as we have an MOD issued operators license so not subject to amateur rules, but it's easy to stay within with most of the baofengs with a bit of programming.Also they aren't inherently illegal, you can own a radio, any radio you want, you don't require a license. It's operating it that requires licensing or qualification unless you reprogramme it to comply.




I'd read PMR446 requires the frequencies and power to be fixed so the end user cannot change them, even if you set these to the same specification it does not make them legal as PMR446 devices as its possible to select a non PMR frequency and over power. PMR used to require integral antennae too, but I half remember Ofcom relaxed that in the UK. (these radios have an integrated antennae, many baofengs don't) but the underlying European Regs still require a non removable antennae.

However I get your point that to all intents and purposes they are PMR spec one locked down and its only illegal to transmit not own a radio.

That said its better people know they should not just buy these and use them without at least checking and restricting the devices than buy them and use them out of the box, and cause problems to other users. I'm sure you'd be annoyed if someone starts using a full power baofeng handies on the same frequencies as your cadets and so swamping them out when they are out in the field.
Bear in mind you can't use this radio legally in the UK unless you hold a valid spectrum license.

A valid spectrum license can be a HAM license, which allows you to use anything between 430-440MHz, or it could be a business radio license, which is given out per frequency.
Trust me 4 times the power off the licence free sets will not give 4 times the range, in the real world you will struggle to find much difference in range, it's purely down to the antenna being so poor and the high freq range.In a built up area forget anything more than 0.5 mile.
gavin151 m ago

I'd read PMR446 requires the frequencies and power to be fixed so the end …I'd read PMR446 requires the frequencies and power to be fixed so the end user cannot change them, even if you set these to the same specification it does not make them legal as PMR446 devices as its possible to select a non PMR frequency and over power. PMR used to require integral antennae too, but I half remember Ofcom relaxed that in the UK. (these radios have an integrated antennae, many baofengs don't) but the underlying European Regs still require a non removable antennae.However I get your point that to all intents and purposes they are PMR spec one locked down and its only illegal to transmit not own a radio.That said its better people know they should not just buy these and use them without at least checking and restricting the devices than buy them and use them out of the box, and cause problems to other users. I'm sure you'd be annoyed if someone starts using a full power baofeng handies on the same frequencies as your cadets and so swamping them out when they are out in the field.


It's only in respect to the user transmitting as far as I know, so as long as you have the frequencies locked in prior to use(not an issue on these since they are fixed channel anyway) then that's fine. The integral part was relaxed in the UK as far as I know, but the EU system is separate than ours as spectrums aren't standardised across Europe. But many of the cheap baofengs are integrated, mostly for that reason. Generally they sell these on the principle that you can program them for your local jurisdiction or usage i.e. PMR, business license etc. as those all vary by country, these are actually fairly specifically targeted at businesses so they would need to reprogram them. They could just sell them blank, or pre set to PMR or an equivalent, but nobody does that.

I wouldn't mind too much, they are after all still line of sight so even at full power it's not that big a difference. And it wouldn't be the first time I've invited local users without a clue down for a radio lesson, it's a good way to show bad practice and get someone new for the cadets to talk to and do a bit of community engagement.
What's the range?
dewonderful10 m ago

Do you know if these are legal in other European countries, like Ireland …Do you know if these are legal in other European countries, like Ireland (Republic)?



Sorry no idea, PMR is standardised around Europe, but for anything with more power, or on different frequencies the regs vary from country to country.

As smckirdycommented you can buy and own the radio quite leggaly, but as to using it as I didn't study under the Irish radio ham syllabus or take the Irish amateur radio exam I don't know the ins and outs of Ireland's rules.

Sorry
Edited by: "gavin1" 17th Aug 2017
no eu plug type in stock
There's plenty of ir2044 certified kit about for not much more dosh certified means type approved and tested . There's plenty of ham chatter on these and other boafeng radios . seems measured ERP is 2 not 5 watts , cheap equipment sprogs adjacent channels and can obviously be a nuscience to other users .one way or another you need a licence so cbpmr would be a better option . Cheap
As chips but not practical for most walkie talkie users unless of course you just don't care about ofcom rules . They do catch people I recently heard of an artist nicked for using an illegal microphone at a gig .
Noghar6 h, 31 m ago

Why do I get the impression the OP is connected to BangGood somehow?


If so, the range on these must be great...
Ok Gav!
so ...if a kid say 6 has them, are they in trouble ? re the super laws above?
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