Unfortunately, this deal is no longer available
Molino Grassi Italian Flour for Pizzas and Focaccia, 1 kg, Pack of 10 at Amazon £12.15 @ Amazon (+£4.49 non-prime)
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Molino Grassi Italian Flour for Pizzas and Focaccia, 1 kg, Pack of 10 at Amazon £12.15 @ Amazon (+£4.49 non-prime)

£12.15 Free P&P FreeAmazon Deals
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Posted 4th Jun

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Great price for top quality 00 flour. Keep your ooni happy!!
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40974898-CWxIJ.jpgThis is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina (right) to add texture to the dough.
It’s only a bit more expensive than the stuff posted here but I buy flour in large quantities. Does anyone know how the flour posted in this deal compares to caputo?

inspired me to post my own deal!
hotukdeals.com/dea…206

EDIT: ***My own deal for Pizza flour was just deleted because the North Korean regime that runs this site couldn't find the wholesaler on their approved list of sites that pay them a kickback***
Edited by: "reakt" 4th Jun
23 Comments
OOS for me
Twynholmblack04/06/2020 14:22

OOS for me


You can still order and secure the price for delivery when back available
This may well be finely milled (Tipo'00') but is only 12g of protein per 100g. For maximum stretch, go for a higher protein content like Marriages Manitoba which is milled from Canadian wheat and has 15g protein per 100g. Although Caputo Blue is considered the gold standard in Italy, it's used because it's locally produced, not because it's the best possible flour for pizza dough.
89quidyoucantgowrong04/06/2020 14:45

This may well be finely milled (Tipo'00') but is only 12g of protein per …This may well be finely milled (Tipo'00') but is only 12g of protein per 100g. For maximum stretch, go for a higher protein content like Marriages Manitoba which is milled from Canadian wheat and has 15g protein per 100g. Although Caputo Blue is considered the gold standard in Italy, it's used because it's locally produced, not because it's the best possible flour for pizza dough.


Caputo blue seems very popular on this side of the pond too, so I don't think it's just down to localness - I've had great results with it.
89quidyoucantgowrong04/06/2020 14:45

This may well be finely milled (Tipo'00') but is only 12g of protein per …This may well be finely milled (Tipo'00') but is only 12g of protein per 100g. For maximum stretch, go for a higher protein content like Marriages Manitoba which is milled from Canadian wheat and has 15g protein per 100g. Although Caputo Blue is considered the gold standard in Italy, it's used because it's locally produced, not because it's the best possible flour for pizza dough.


True, but it's still good enough for pizza and bread, and the price is really good, these days flour is really a scalper item.
89quidyoucantgowrong04/06/2020 14:45

This may well be finely milled (Tipo'00') but is only 12g of protein per …This may well be finely milled (Tipo'00') but is only 12g of protein per 100g. For maximum stretch, go for a higher protein content like Marriages Manitoba which is milled from Canadian wheat and has 15g protein per 100g. Although Caputo Blue is considered the gold standard in Italy, it's used because it's locally produced, not because it's the best possible flour for pizza dough.


There are some that use Manitoba together with other flours but the problem with Manitoba is that is too rich in gluten (protein).
So it is very resistent and requires a long leavening, which is the secret of a perfect Italian pizza, but the result would be a dough not soft enough. Pizza is not bread and you need both a long leavening but also a light dough. Imho I don't think that Manitoba is either the healhier nor the more cost-effective choice but that all depends on what kind of pizza you prefer.
Edited by: "wh1zzard" 4th Jun
White flour not wholegrain , explains all Italians dying from Coronavirus even with best Mediterranean diet . Looks they lost all their common sense in factory processed and bleached white pasta , White flour and white pizzas .
Edited by: "Hot-Dealer" 4th Jun
40974898-CWxIJ.jpgThis is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina (right) to add texture to the dough.
It’s only a bit more expensive than the stuff posted here but I buy flour in large quantities. Does anyone know how the flour posted in this deal compares to caputo?

inspired me to post my own deal!
hotukdeals.com/dea…206

EDIT: ***My own deal for Pizza flour was just deleted because the North Korean regime that runs this site couldn't find the wholesaler on their approved list of sites that pay them a kickback***
Edited by: "reakt" 4th Jun
Thanks ordered. Wanted this last time but it was gone in a blink. I'll turn this into many healthy meals. Cheers OP
wh1zzard04/06/2020 15:29

There are some that use Manitoba together with other flours but the …There are some that use Manitoba together with other flours but the problem with Manitoba is that is too rich in gluten (protein).So it is very resistent and requires a long leavening, which is the secret of a perfect Italian pizza, but the result would be a dough not soft enough. Pizza is not bread and you need both a long leavening but also a light dough. Imho I don't think that Manitoba is either the healhier nor the more cost-effective choice but that all depends on what kind of pizza you prefer.


Hi Wh1zzard, not sure if you realise but you seem to be contradicting yourself. A soft dough is a high hydration dough, you need gluten to hold it together. The higher protein content means the ability to produce more gluten during long fermentation times, resulting in lovely soft stretchy dough which supports higher hydration rates due to the generously glutenous structure. This soft, glutinous, stretchy dough is able to better contain the gasses as they rapidly expand in the oven to produce a fantastic crust.

I experimented with both Caputo Blue and Manitoba for pizza bases over an extended period and the Canadian flour won. Not for health or price, it wins for taste and texture. In Costco, Manitoba is only around £12 for a 16kg sack anyway, when it's in stock

Since the lock down, I started dabbling with sourdough when fresh yeast ran into short supply. With yeast returning to the shops again, I've recently had some amazing results combining mature sourdough starter with yeast leavened pizza dough hydrated at 67% total. The starter boosts the gluten content even higher for amazingly good crusts. You should see how much the pucks bloat up after shaping for the final rise. I recommend trying it if you have the time.
reakt04/06/2020 16:01

[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina …[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina (right) to add texture to the dough.It’s only a bit more expensive than the stuff posted here but I buy flour in large quantities. Does anyone know how the flour posted in this deal compares to caputo?inspired me to post my own deal! https://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/25kg-caputo-blue-italian-pizza-flour-2917-delivered-at-a-di-maria-son-italian-wholesaler-3478206EDIT: ***My own deal for Pizza flour was just deleted because the North Korean regime that runs this site couldn't find the wholesaler on their approved list of sites that pay them a kickback***


Adi maria is where I get mine too crackign site just wish they woudl ship their deserts as they look awesome haha
J113504/06/2020 17:45

Adi maria is where I get mine too crackign site just wish they woudl …Adi maria is where I get mine too crackign site just wish they woudl ship their deserts as they look awesome haha


A Di maria was the deal I posted earlier - you might have seen it but it was removed because it apparently didn’t uphold the high quality expected here. Which is interesting as they permit deals linking to random (and faceless) sellers on eBay and aliexpress
reakt04/06/2020 16:01

[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina …[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina (right) to add texture to the dough.It’s only a bit more expensive than the stuff posted here but I buy flour in large quantities. Does anyone know how the flour posted in this deal compares to caputo?inspired me to post my own deal! https://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/25kg-caputo-blue-italian-pizza-flour-2917-delivered-at-a-di-maria-son-italian-wholesaler-3478206EDIT: ***My own deal for Pizza flour was just deleted because the North Korean regime that runs this site couldn't find the wholesaler on their approved list of sites that pay them a kickback***


Do you have a recipe you follow for your pizza bases? Thanks
Gordybaillie04/06/2020 19:37

Do you have a recipe you follow for your pizza bases? Thanks


I use often use Jamie Oliver’s pizza dough recipe from his books. I found it online but this version has olive oil in the dough. I would skip that step.
jamieoliver.com/rec…gh/
Edited by: "reakt" 4th Jun
reakt04/06/2020 20:57

I use often use Jamie Oliver’s pizza dough recipe from his books. I found i …I use often use Jamie Oliver’s pizza dough recipe from his books. I found it online but this version has olive oilin the dough. I would skip that step.https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/bread-recipes/pizza-dough/


Great thanks
reakt04/06/2020 16:01

[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina …[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina (right) to add texture to the dough.It’s only a bit more expensive than the stuff posted here but I buy flour in large quantities. Does anyone know how the flour posted in this deal compares to caputo?inspired me to post my own deal! https://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/25kg-caputo-blue-italian-pizza-flour-2917-delivered-at-a-di-maria-son-italian-wholesaler-3478206EDIT: ***My own deal for Pizza flour was just deleted because the North Korean regime that runs this site couldn't find the wholesaler on their approved list of sites that pay them a kickback***



I've only tried the caputo blue once but found the Molino one was better both in texture while stretching and once cooked, but then again my pizza never seems to be the same twice Worth a punt at this price.
What is the best flour to use too make a deep pan base please?
reakt04/06/2020 19:04

A Di maria was the deal I posted earlier - you might have seen it but it …A Di maria was the deal I posted earlier - you might have seen it but it was removed because it apparently didn’t uphold the high quality expected here. Which is interesting as they permit deals linking to random (and faceless) sellers on eBay and aliexpress


aye daft at times mate
Gordybaillie04/06/2020 19:37

Do you have a recipe you follow for your pizza bases? Thanks



Gordy, the secret is that you will need to vary the hydration of your dough depending on the inherent hydration of the 'dry' flour when doing your recipe calculations. Periods of high or low humidity in the weather will alter the hydration of the 'dry' flour over time and this needs to be compensated for. This means that a perfectly good recipe can be fine one week and too sticky to shape the next, assuming that you're aiming to achieve the highest possible workable hydration rate at any given time. You also need to adjust fermentation times for the changing ambient temperature throughout the year. The temperature of tap-water varies between summer and winter too, which can also affect timings.

Download a pizza dough calculator app from your mobile phone app store to help with calculating your recipes and make adjustments in small increments. I've been using an Android one called PizzApp. You'll need to start all over again each time you change your flour choice. As a starting point, try 63% total hydration and gradually push this up as far as you can while still maintaining a workable dough. Using less yeast to allow longer fermentation times will result in a more elastic dough, thanks to the enzyme action which breaks down the protein into gluten. Plenty of people start their pizza dough a full 24hrs before they intend to use it to get a really good flavour. This is all configurable in the apps, including split temperature fermentation timings, multiple pizza base weights, etc. Over time, you'll start to get a feel for when your dough is correctly hydrated as you're mixing and kneading.

Have fun and experiment!
89quidyoucantgowrong05/06/2020 20:04

Gordy, the secret is that you will need to vary the hydration of your …Gordy, the secret is that you will need to vary the hydration of your dough depending on the inherent hydration of the 'dry' flour when doing your recipe calculations. Periods of high or low humidity in the weather will alter the hydration of the 'dry' flour over time and this needs to be compensated for. This means that a perfectly good recipe can be fine one week and too sticky to shape the next, assuming that you're aiming to achieve the highest possible workable hydration rate at any given time. You also need to adjust fermentation times for the changing ambient temperature throughout the year. The temperature of tap-water varies between summer and winter too, which can also affect timings.Download a pizza dough calculator app from your mobile phone app store to help with calculating your recipes and make adjustments in small increments. I've been using an Android one called PizzApp. You'll need to start all over again each time you change your flour choice. As a starting point, try 63% total hydration and gradually push this up as far as you can while still maintaining a workable dough. Using less yeast to allow longer fermentation times will result in a more elastic dough, thanks to the enzyme action which breaks down the protein into gluten. Plenty of people start their pizza dough a full 24hrs before they intend to use it to get a really good flavour. This is all configurable in the apps, including split temperature fermentation timings, multiple pizza base weights, etc. Over time, you'll start to get a feel for when your dough is correctly hydrated as you're mixing and kneading.Have fun and experiment!



Thank you for the info 89quid - keen to learn your method for cooking pizza at home. What do you use? The app suggestion is great.
Thanks.
Hi Nick, I use a Ferrari G3 and when it dies I will probably replace it with one of those huge 'semi-professional' ones with a drop down front door and 16" base. Much as I would love a wood-fired cooker like an Ooni or even a full size one in the garden, I cook pizza every Saturday all year round and so need to rely on an electric oven which can be used indoors.

There was a lot of discussion here on pizza making when I first bought the Ferrari. In a change to previous advice on using the oven, I've been leaving the lid up for the first minute or two of cooking to get more 'spring' from the edges of the pizza. The result is that it really puffs up nicely around the edges. Putting the lid down straight away was causing the top of the dough to set too quickly, before it had a chance to bubble up. The Ferrari G3 deal threads which pop up from time to time are usually filled with plenty of tips on pizza making, so worth taking a read through them. Obviously there's always disagreement, so try out whatever makes most sense to you.
Mine turned up. Made some pizza dough on Saturday and it went down really well with the family.

I did a base 600g flour / 400ml water and added flour slowly until I just had a workable dough. Results were :

655g Flour
400ml warm water + 1tb sugar
knob of fresh yeast I scrounged from a baker dissolved in above water
2 tb olive oil
1.5 teaspoon salt

Considering I did a fast rise and machine knead of the dough (1.5 hours for the whole dough), it came out really well. A good chewy crust and base. Next lot I do will be an overnight prove and slow rise.
reakt04/06/2020 16:01

[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina …[Image] This is the only pizza flour I use caputo plus their semolina (right) to add texture to the dough.It’s only a bit more expensive than the stuff posted here but I buy flour in large quantities. Does anyone know how the flour posted in this deal compares to caputo?inspired me to post my own deal! https://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/25kg-caputo-blue-italian-pizza-flour-2917-delivered-at-a-di-maria-son-italian-wholesaler-3478206EDIT: ***My own deal for Pizza flour was just deleted because the North Korean regime that runs this site couldn't find the wholesaler on their approved list of sites that pay them a kickback***


Caputo all the way!
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