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M&S British Rump steaks 222g £3 in-store offer. (Sirloin steaks £4)
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M&S British Rump steaks 222g £3 in-store offer. (Sirloin steaks £4)

10
Posted 30th JulEdited by:"sjs31"
M&S British Beef 222g Rump steaks (28 day matured) are on offer @ £3, down from £4. (= £13.51 per Kg). Sirloin steaks are @ £4 for a similar weight. I believe the offer runs until 4th Aug.

I've bought them a few times recently and they are delicious.

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Not a terrible price per kilo, but I've found m&s steak to be hugely variable in quality. Often find lots of packs where the meat is greying at the corners.
Rump/ sirloin steak from Aldi is lovely
The £10 M & S sirloin steaks are awesome
Go vegan
grex910130/07/2019 16:56

Not a terrible price per kilo, but I've found m&s steak to be hugely …Not a terrible price per kilo, but I've found m&s steak to be hugely variable in quality. Often find lots of packs where the meat is greying at the corners.


This just indicates the development of metmyoglobin as the meat oxidises slightly. It does not, of itself, mean that the meat is spoiled.
mantavani31/07/2019 22:29

This just indicates the development of metmyoglobin as the meat oxidises …This just indicates the development of metmyoglobin as the meat oxidises slightly. It does not, of itself, mean that the meat is spoiled.


Yes, however other supermarkets manage to seal their meats to avoid this.
grex910131/07/2019 22:31

Yes, however other supermarkets manage to seal their meats to avoid this.


Not necessarily. Firstly that plastic packaging is often oxygen permeable, and in any case what you think of as cherry red ‘fresh’ meat has already been exposed to a high oxygen tension (unoxidised myoglobin is purpleish-red, cherry red is oxymyoglobin). Supermarkets know that meat colour is a key purchase influencer amongst consumers, so various sometimes nefarious packaging tricks (modified atmosphere) and additives (antioxidants, dyes) can be used to try and maintain the cherry red colour unnaturally - but properly hung and aged beef develops a higher % of metmyoglobin and should tend towards the darker anyway.

Other factors include age of the animal at slaughter, stress, diet, method of ageing (if aged at all)...

I’m not rooting for m&s here. Just pointing out that a bit of greying alone tells you nothing about the safety or quality of the meat. Personally I prefer my beef to be nicely aged (stop sniggering at the back).
mantavani31/07/2019 23:51

Not necessarily. Firstly that plastic packaging is often oxygen permeable, …Not necessarily. Firstly that plastic packaging is often oxygen permeable, and in any case what you think of as cherry red ‘fresh’ meat has already been exposed to a high oxygen tension (unoxidised myoglobin is purpleish-red, cherry red is oxymyoglobin). Supermarkets know that meat colour is a key purchase influencer amongst consumers, so various sometimes nefarious packaging tricks (modified atmosphere) and additives (antioxidants, dyes) can be used to try and maintain the cherry red colour unnaturally - but properly hung and aged beef develops a higher % of metmyoglobin and should tend towards the darker anyway.Other factors include age of the animal at slaughter, stress, diet, method of ageing (if aged at all)...I’m not rooting for m&s here. Just pointing out that a bit of greying alone tells you nothing about the safety or quality of the meat. Personally I prefer my beef to be nicely aged (stop sniggering at the back).



Contender for post of the year here. Great info. Very much appreciated.
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