Muddyfox Evolve200 aluminium folding bike with Shimano Nexus 7 speed hub £224.99 @ Sports Direct
-20°Expired

Muddyfox Evolve200 aluminium folding bike with Shimano Nexus 7 speed hub £224.99 @ Sports Direct

14
Found 26th Sep 2017
> Alloy Folding Bike Frame
> Alloy Rigid Front Forks
> Alloy Handlebars
> Alloy Telescopic Folding Handlebar Stem
> 7 Speed Shimano Nexus in-hub gears with Shimano Nexus Revoshift Shifter
> Prowheel Chainset - 46T
> Promax Front and Rear Alloy V-Brakes
> 20" Alloy Wheels - Front Quick Release
> Alloy Pannier Rack
> Alloy Kickstand
> Front and Rear Mudguards
> Velo Folding Bike Saddle with Bumpers


Looks to be a great value hub geared folding bike. Derailleurs are not ideal for folding bikes. They can get easily damaged both when folding and hitting kerbs etc. They are also more likely to suffer from dirt and mud from the road as there is very little clearance between the derailleur and the ground. Hub geared bikes are ideal for folding bikes. Not only that but the gearing can be changed at any point, stationary, moving etc. It makes the experience of using the gears much easier. Also a wider gear range than many most derailleur equipped folding bikes.


The £224.99 price includes delivery of £4.99. Cashback is available through topcashback and quidco and is meant to be limited to purchases of £200 or less but that excludes VAT and the delivery charge so this should be eligible for cashback of about 4% which will at least cover the delivery charge. Just don't make additional purchases with the bike that will take the order total at or over £244.99. There is no option for click and collect so you cannot get the £5 instore voucher that Sports Direct offer.

I understand Sports Direct are unpopular with a lot of people for obvious reasons but this is a fantastic value bike for its price. Try to find a Nexus 7 equipped folding bike for anywhere near this. The bike seems to have good quality one step up components and is lightweight. The handlebars are height adjustable and the bike features rack and mudguards plus a kickstand and still comes in at about 13kg.

It's unlikely Sports Direct will be able to offer much support or after-sales service. If you don't know how to maintain a bike you may be better off with going to your local bike shop for your purchase instead. It shouldn't need much maintenance but will need some over time and a proper check when you have done the initial minor assembly.

There are many benefits a folding bike has over a conventional bike and many disadvantages too. The advantages;

1. Easily stored at home or office and transported in a vehicle.
2. Is quickly size adjustable to suit many different riders so one bike can be used for a whole family etc.
3. Huge money savings. Can be used for partial commutes. Store in car. Park car in free parking area and do a small cycling commute to do the final part of the journey to work. Can eliminate parking costs. Alternatively cycle the complete journey and save much more money in fuel.
4. Huge health benefits to cycling which can extend you life, prevent illnesses and improve your mood.
5. Enables you to enjoy more of the food you like instead of calorie counting so much. Because you will need additional food for cycling to maintain the same weight level.
6. 20" wheels are a good compromise size between portability and good riding experience.
7. Enables you to travel into many areas not available to cars and motorbikes; parks, city centres etc.
8. Your cycling commute becomes your exercise regime eliminating or reducing your need to pay and go to gyms. Releasing more time for other things.
9. Small folding bike wheels are often stronger than many other types of road wheels and more difficult to knock out of true.
10. Provide a slightly different riding experience to larger wheeled bikes and capable of easier and rapid direction movement between cars and other traffic. Sort of slightly like a BMX bike which shares the same size 20" wheels.
Community Updates

Groups

14 Comments
same price from muddyfox
Muddy Fox used to be good brand name in bikes, not now the Astley empire bought it over and mass produced them to a far inferior standard to the way they used to be manufactured. I know it’s not a Brompton, but would envisage this would be very heavy and be worth nowhere near the £225 price tag. Sorry but cold from me on this one.
Original Poster
nougat8 h, 0 m ago

same price from muddyfox


Reason I used the sports direct link was the 4% cashback which you can't get through muddyfox.
Original Poster
Glesgabear4 h, 38 m ago

Muddy Fox used to be good brand name in bikes, not now the Astley empire …Muddy Fox used to be good brand name in bikes, not now the Astley empire bought it over and mass produced them to a far inferior standard to the way they used to be manufactured. I know it’s not a Brompton, but would envisage this would be very heavy and be worth nowhere near the £225 price tag. Sorry but cold from me on this one.


I've already given the spec in the listing and 13kg is very competitive for a a 20" folding bike with a nexus hub and fitted accessories. So no it isn't heavy, as many more basic folding bikes can be 15-16kg for a similar size. As for general quality this particular bikes seems very good. Obviously the Shimano Nexus 7 dictates the quality of gearing and rear hub which is high. Generally the frames of their bike are rated up uto 115/120kg normally higher than many competitors and fully certified. As for other components I would say competitive. I wouldn't compare this bike to the low end Muddy Fox dual suspension bikes that are comparable to Apollo bikes at halfords or Argos, Toys r Us etc.

For those considering this bike but worried by the negative votes you need to factor in that many people dislike Sports Direct as a company and will vote cold automatically on seeing such a deal. You need to look at the product itself and compare its value to other similar bikes. I personally think its exceptional value for what it is.

google.co.uk/sea…ike

The Dahon that comes up at 3x the price, appears to be heavier and likely to have a lower weight capacity of either 95 or 105kg. Apart from that appears to be pretty much identical spec.
Glesgabear7 h, 22 m ago

Muddy Fox used to be good brand name in bikes, not now the Astley empire …Muddy Fox used to be good brand name in bikes, not now the Astley empire bought it over and mass produced them to a far inferior standard to the way they used to be manufactured. I know it’s not a Brompton, but would envisage this would be very heavy and be worth nowhere near the £225 price tag. Sorry but cold from me on this one.



I would think an internal geared 7 speed hub would bring this bike as competitive as it gets. You're probably right about the quality but isn't that with bikes at this price range.
Glesgabear26th Sep

Muddy Fox used to be good brand name in bikes, not now the Astley empire …Muddy Fox used to be good brand name in bikes, not now the Astley empire bought it over and mass produced them to a far inferior standard to the way they used to be manufactured. I know it’s not a Brompton, but would envisage this would be very heavy and be worth nowhere near the £225 price tag. Sorry but cold from me on this one.


As said by the OP, the Shimano hub is decent spec. I know Muddy fox are not great, but at this price it seems pretty good. Personally I would prefer a Brompton, but you'd never see one of those at this price 2nd hand , let alone new.
Original Poster
Still for sale at this price.
is this better value than the greenway folding bike you posted ?

I actually bought th greenway bike for £172.99 delivered as ebay had a 20% off day - would that possibly make the greenway slightly better value even though it doesnt have mudguards, pannier rack, alloy fork or internal gearing ?
Edited by: "bayhabourbutcher" 29th Dec 2017
Original Poster
bayhabourbutcher16 h, 20 m ago

is this better value than the greenway folding bike you posted ?I actually …is this better value than the greenway folding bike you posted ?I actually bought th greenway bike for £172.99 delivered as ebay had a 20% off day - would that possibly make the greenway slightly better value even though it doesnt have mudguards, pannier rack, alloy fork or internal gearing ?


How is the Greenway bike, the good the bad? £173 for the Greenway surely is a huge bargain given the components fitted. I've seen reviews of the Muddyfox bike and although the components supplied were excellent for the money assembly was poor and its a bike that needs a full service really before using correcting the poor assembly, except for the rear hub which is pretty much good to go. Hub gears vs derailleur definitely favours hub gears for a folding bike. They can't be knocked/damaged and you can change gear at any time. Ideal for commuting through cities etc.

The Greenway has a cassette/freehub drivetrain and decent claris derailleur so still a huge step up from the basic tourney/freewheel setup of most folding bikes at anywhere near this price. You could pay getting on £600 for some Dahon's and Terns and just end up with a low end freewheel drivetrain.

Does the Greenway state a maximum rider weight in the manual?
bonzobanana10 h, 2 m ago

How is the Greenway bike, the good the bad? £173 for the Greenway surely …How is the Greenway bike, the good the bad? £173 for the Greenway surely is a huge bargain given the components fitted. I've seen reviews of the Muddyfox bike and although the components supplied were excellent for the money assembly was poor and its a bike that needs a full service really before using correcting the poor assembly, except for the rear hub which is pretty much good to go. Hub gears vs derailleur definitely favours hub gears for a folding bike. They can't be knocked/damaged and you can change gear at any time. Ideal for commuting through cities etc. The Greenway has a cassette/freehub drivetrain and decent claris derailleur so still a huge step up from the basic tourney/freewheel setup of most folding bikes at anywhere near this price. You could pay getting on £600 for some Dahon's and Terns and just end up with a low end freewheel drivetrain.Does the Greenway state a maximum rider weight in the manual?


Im not getting it until jan 4th so dont know yet - Im 15+ stone so hopefully it can cope

I did take a slight risk as I couldnt find any measurements for the max. inside leg length before the 20% off offer expired - Im about 33 inside leg i.e. have quite long legs so theres a possibility I may not be able to get the seat quite high enough for optimal pedaling position but I can probably live with that given what I plan to use it for

I only saw the muddyfox offer after the greenway purchase & would have found the mudgaurds & pannier rack useful - I can use the £s Ive saved to buy & fit them on the greenway instead - I may buy a bag that attaches to the seatpost instead
Edited by: "bayhabourbutcher" 30th Dec 2017
bonzobanana30th Dec 2017

How is the Greenway bike, the good the bad? £173 for the Greenway surely …How is the Greenway bike, the good the bad? £173 for the Greenway surely is a huge bargain given the components fitted. I've seen reviews of the Muddyfox bike and although the components supplied were excellent for the money assembly was poor and its a bike that needs a full service really before using correcting the poor assembly, except for the rear hub which is pretty much good to go. Hub gears vs derailleur definitely favours hub gears for a folding bike. They can't be knocked/damaged and you can change gear at any time. Ideal for commuting through cities etc. The Greenway has a cassette/freehub drivetrain and decent claris derailleur so still a huge step up from the basic tourney/freewheel setup of most folding bikes at anywhere near this price. You could pay getting on £600 for some Dahon's and Terns and just end up with a low end freewheel drivetrain.Does the Greenway state a maximum rider weight in the manual?


got to say im not that impressed so far

here are main issues discovered so far :

1) the only documentation to come with the bike was some generic booklet they use for ALL their bikes - there were no specific instructions about this folding bike so I had to figure out how to assemble it myself which I have hopefully managed to do correctly

2) the main folding hinge in the centre of the bike is very stiff & unwieldy which makes the bike very hard to fold - you end up using your body to help with the folding so dont wear anyting that you dont want oil or dirt on

3) the product arrived with a damaged shimano claris shifter (piece broken off), some chips to the frame paintwork and zinc plated bolts that had already started to corrode - I have emailed the seller asking if they will consider a partial refund to cover these issues - the shifter is probably still functional despite the damage so the bike should still be rideable

4) the brakes came unconfigured eg the pads didnt even line up with the wheel rims - hopefully the gears will have been set up properly but cant check properly until I ride the bike

Havent ridden it yet in case I have to return the whole product - which I will probably do if they refuse to consider a partial refund

Compared to the 'factory second' ridgeback bike I bought from bike depot this purchase is much more problematical
Edited by: "bayhabourbutcher" 5th Jan
Original Poster
Documentation like that is pretty much standard I would say with these types of box shifters but normally you'd get one sheet with anything specific required as you say so nothing is poor although I personally have encountered this quite often so would be expected.

Main folding hinge being stiff is fairly normal, you don't want it loose, you'll probably find it will loosen a little with use and this issue will pass.

I would expect a partial refund because of the frame scratches and replacement parts sent for the other issues or a larger refund same as you.

Perhaps when you have sorted the issues if you get to keep the bike (I would if you get a reasonable partial refund considering the spec) you can give your views again when its a fully working bike.
we agreed on a £25 refund in the end (initially offered £20 but then I also had to replace the front inner tube which was was faulty/punctured)

Given the damage was minor & didnt affect the rideabiity (after the inner tube was replaced) then it was a fair arrangement

Either I was a bit unlucky or the company could do with better quality control - not sure which

The bike was OK to ride over a mostly level 6 mile stretch - slightly wobbly front stem but I think I just need to tighten things up a bit to improve on that - the seat post stayed in place & didnt slip with my 15 stone weight on it - the gearing is OK although I wouldnt want to go up an longish steepish extended incline as the easiest gear isnt really made for it

Wouldnt want to travel more than 6 miles or so but it will be fine for shorter distances - it feels like its harder work than a racer / hybrid I guess mainly because you have to more actively steer it since the fork are further away from the handlebar
Edited by: "bayhabourbutcher" 12th Jan
Original Poster
So effectively you have paid about £150 for a lightweight aluminium folding bike with a freehub based drivetrain and decent components. It's a pretty good deal to say the least. You could pay £500 for a Dahon and get a weaker frame, inferior drivetrain but a decent brand slapped on the frame. The Dahon would likely be heavier.

Some of your criticisms could be labelled at all folding bikes but poor assembly seems to be a common theme on bikes like this they really need a full check before use. Same is true of the Muddyfox of this thread. The bike seems to be configured for high speed commuting with its sporty saddle and tyres but a more relaxed bike could be achieved with a different saddle and wider profile tyres that are a bit harder to turn and give more suspension to insulate you from pot holes more etc. Tyre pressures should be thereabouts a 15% widening from on the bike and off the bike with lower pressures at the front normal as more weight is at the back. It's only a very general rule, spending time to get tyre pressures just right for your weight can improve the ride quality dramatically both in your comfort and how the bike grips the road, over pressure and under pressure both have their own set of problems.

If you find you really don't like the bike you should be able to get more than what you paid for it. Pointing out stuff like the Claris derailleur etc with a decent advert.

As for hill climbing when you look at the image of the bike it looks like a short ratio cassette with not much of a granny gear for hill climbing but in the spec it says 12-32 with 32 being reasonable for hill climbing might be worth checking what you have. However the bike is definitely configured for speed you have a 52T front chainring but its common to see 46 or 48T on some other folding bikes which is much slower making hill climbing easier but top speed lower. Might be worth changing the front crankset or rear cassette to make it easier for hill climbing. The derailleur looks quite long maybe you could get away with something like a 11-34 cassette that would give you greater top speed and easier hill climbing.

halfords.com/cyc…34t
Edited by: "bonzobanana" 13th Jan
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text