Mustool MT223 60W Adjustable Temperature Electric Soldering Iron Welding Rework Repair Tool - £6.33 @ Banggood
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Mustool MT223 60W Adjustable Temperature Electric Soldering Iron Welding Rework Repair Tool - £6.33 @ Banggood

27
Found 4th Sep 2017
I found a great price for this soldering tool for £6.33 with 5pcs Solder Tips I/3C/4C/K/2.4D 110V/220V Option. I hope this can help you a lot.

Features:
Adjustable temperature controlled soldering iron: 200-450°C.
Adjust the temperature according to your need by the knob wheel on the electronic soldering iron.
Soldering iron with 60W and 5pcs replaceable tips.
Five different tips makes soldering iron easy to fit.
Better heat dissipation efficiency.
No need soldering station, just plug and play.
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Don't bother with these Chinese irons. I've bought multiple and all had "popped and smoked" the first time I used them. They all looked exactly like this one.
Got a cheap one from Amazon (with a UK plug) and I've used it for over a year now only needing to replace tips.
Edited by: "umirza85" 4th Sep 2017
27 Comments
Don't bother with these Chinese irons. I've bought multiple and all had "popped and smoked" the first time I used them. They all looked exactly like this one.
Got a cheap one from Amazon (with a UK plug) and I've used it for over a year now only needing to replace tips.
Edited by: "umirza85" 4th Sep 2017
I bought this one and the temp control knob broke, it's Very inconvenient.
Two pin plug, so there's no Earth on it!


Wear rubber gloves when using it in case the insulation on the element breaks down and the iron's tip goes live.
melted3 h, 10 m ago

Two pin plug, so there's no Earth on it!Wear rubber gloves when using it …Two pin plug, so there's no Earth on it!Wear rubber gloves when using it in case the insulation on the element breaks down and the iron's tip goes live.


Exactly, there's no way this is double insulated.
Bought the Kit one on Ebay for double this price and has worked well the few times used.
Just checked the 3 pin plug earth to the tip and it has continuity, so if became live would throw the isolator or blow the fuse.
CPC sell an adjustable temperature iron for £10.40, and a few quid cheaper when they have it on offer:- cpc.farnell.com/dur…674


31889579-Z4gSO.jpgThey're a UK based supplier, so it should comply with UK electrical safety regulation, which makes it worth the extra few quid. And it is fitted with a UK plug.


Alternatively, here's a fixed wattage one with a silicone lead on offer for £4 :- cpc.farnell.com/dur…rch


I have an Antex iron with a silicone flex myself, which I bought over 20 years ago.
Edited by: "melted" 4th Sep 2017
Go Weller if you can afford to.
too high a wattage for electronics - get Antex 12 Watts
foes4you12 m ago

too high a wattage for electronics - get Antex 12 Watts


HAHA,

I've got a Weller WSD81 which is 80w and a Hakko FX-951 which is 75w
foes4you11 h, 54 m ago

too high a wattage for electronics - get Antex 12 Watts



Comment of the day right here ^ If I were you I wouldn't go anywhere near a soldering iron. I work as an I.T, refurbisher and we do phone repairs, please tell me the professional technicians we use are wrong to use an 80W soldering station near electronics. Why are there so many clueless people in the world? How does this happen?
Edited by: "fishmaster" 5th Sep 2017
I guess the valve heaters need a bit more power.
foes4you20 m ago

I guess the valve heaters need a bit more power.


Seriously explain what you mean by 12 Watts is too high a wattage for electronics? Be specific, do you mean all electronics or just some and which? If you were replacing a U2 IC or NAND on an iPhone is 60W too much power? Why is it too much power? Have you done those procedures yourself?
foes4you12 h, 36 m ago

too high a wattage for electronics - get Antex 12 Watts



There may well be too much voltage leakage from the tip to use on static sensitive electronics, however this piece of unsafe junk does have a knob to turn the power down.

Its maximum wattage is only really relevant to how quick it heats back up, its maximum temperature, and how thick a piece of wire you could use it to solder.

It used to be popular to hook up a standard fixed wattage soldering iron like mine to a simmerstat to achieve the same thing.

I wouldn't use a fixed 60W iron on electronics, but I have used 15 - 25 watt ones.

The posters below you appear to be referring to temperature controlled soldering stations, the more wattage those have, the more precisely they should be capable of maintaining the correct tip temperature as set by the user.

I once used an expensive soldering station my brother arranged to borrow from his workplace for me, as I had the need to solder a chip that had tight requirements about soldering temperature and time, I was surprised how much using a really high end iron improved the quality of my soldering, and yes it was an awful LOT more than 12 watts
Edited by: "melted" 5th Sep 2017
fishmaster3 h, 17 m ago

Comment of the day right here ^ If I were you I wouldn't go anywhere near …Comment of the day right here ^ If I were you I wouldn't go anywhere near a soldering iron. I work as an I.T, refurbisher and we do phone repairs, please tell me the professional technicians we use are wrong to use an 80W soldering station near electronics. Why are there so many clueless people in the world? How does this happen? The wrong sperm hit the egg unfortunately.



Very harsh and imperious comment, I started (like many) with an Antex 15w soldering iron, these days a 24v Weller 45W TCP with various tips does for most jobs, and yes a low wattage iron often does more damage than good

Oh, btw I've been soldering for over 45 years, sort of got a black belt in it ...
fishmaster7 h, 42 m ago

Comment of the day right here ^ If I were you I wouldn't go anywhere near …Comment of the day right here ^ If I were you I wouldn't go anywhere near a soldering iron. I work as an I.T, refurbisher and we do phone repairs, please tell me the professional technicians we use are wrong to use an 80W soldering station near electronics. Why are there so many clueless people in the world? How does this happen? The wrong sperm hit the egg unfortunately.



I use a 400W blow torch (and a 60W soldering iron) to remove and solder back ICs, and so far have not blown any. There are many variables at play, many to do with proper heat dissipation, when soldering. e.g. how much flux you use, and how quickly you solder, how tinned is your soldering tip etc.
Edited by: "cfphoenix" 5th Sep 2017
Cold, not a metcal.
Not everyone wants to solder delicate electronics. I have several similar cheap Chinese soldering irons and they do the job just fine. You can keep one in the car boot , others your tool boxes, etc. For instance car battery charger crockerdile clip became detached from its wire, resoldered simple with one of these.
I would not touch it if it has not got an earth. As has been said, there are others you can buy in the UK for a little bit more which are safer to use.
I've bought quite a lot of stuff from Banggood with no issues but would be wary of anything direct from China that plugs into the mains, as others have said. Buy cheap for low voltage but not mains voltage.
Buy rubbish from China and wait for s h it to hit the fan
melted9 h, 52 m ago

There may well be too much voltage leakage from the tip to use on static …There may well be too much voltage leakage from the tip to use on static sensitive electronics, however this piece of potentially unsafe junk does have a knob to turn the power down.Its maximum wattage is only really relevant to how quick it heats back up, its maximum temperature, and how thick a piece of wire you could use it to solder. It used to be popular to hook up a standard fixed wattage soldering iron like mine to a simmerstat to achieve the same thing.I wouldn't use a fixed 60W iron on electronics, but I have used 15 - 25 watt ones.The posters below you appear to be referring to temperature controlled soldering stations, the more wattage those have, the more precisely they should be capable of maintaining the correct tip temperature as set by the user.I once used an expensive soldering station my brother arranged to borrow from his workplace for me, as I had the need to solder a chip that had tight requirements about soldering temperature and time, I was surprised how much using a really high end iron improved the quality of my soldering, and yes it was an awful LOT more than 12 watts


You don't actually need to spend a lot, the CSI 2900 from Circuit Specialists is very close to a Hakko in performance and costs about £60. It also takes Hakko tips (including 0.1mm for micro soldering) and has temperature sensor in the tip. You can do most jobs using that station.
Edited by: "fishmaster" 5th Sep 2017
timefortea2 h, 56 m ago

I've bought quite a lot of stuff from Banggood with no issues but would be …I've bought quite a lot of stuff from Banggood with no issues but would be wary of anything direct from China that plugs into the mains, as others have said. Buy cheap for low voltage but not mains voltage.


I'm usually very wary too, but in this case I'm pretty confident that this is electrically unsafe as it has got no earth and is not double insulated.

Here's a link to couple of pictures of the insides, and yes the one on the right has blown up :- zimagez.com/zim…php

I think it is just using some sort of triac based dimmer circuit.
Edited by: "melted" 5th Sep 2017
Proveright3 h, 54 m ago

Not everyone wants to solder delicate electronics. I have several …Not everyone wants to solder delicate electronics. I have several similar cheap Chinese soldering irons and they do the job just fine. You can keep one in the car boot , others your tool boxes, etc. For instance car battery charger crockerdile clip became detached from its wire, resoldered simple with one of these.




But for just £4 you can buy an iron from a UK supplier and not risk electrocution each time you use it!
Electronics engineer here, would never go near a 12w iron for electronics or electrical purpose, wattage too low.

I have always used a temp control 50w iron around 350 to 400° but have gone higher when soldering large electrical wires to lugs etc.
Also use a gas iron when working with electrical stuff or for wiring in the car. But wouldn't use for electronics as it's too hot for that and the exhaust emits hot gas/air that could damage loose wires and connectors that may incidentally be there.
Edited by: "polarbaba" 5th Sep 2017
melted21 h, 43 m ago

CPC sell an adjustable temperature iron for £10.40, and a few quid cheaper …CPC sell an adjustable temperature iron for £10.40, and a few quid cheaper when they have it on offer:- http://cpc.farnell.com/duratool/d00803/soldering-iron-50w-variable-temp/dp/SD01674[Image] They're a UK based supplier, so it should comply with UK electrical safety regulation, which makes it worth the extra few quid. And it is fitted with a UK plug.Alternatively, here's a fixed wattage one with a silicone lead on offer for £4 :- http://cpc.farnell.com/duratool/d03174/40w-soldering-iron-silicone-lead/dp/SD0213006?ost=sd0213006&searchView=table&iscrfnonsku=false&ddkey=http:en-CPC/CPC_United_Kingdom/searchI have an Antex iron with a silicone flex myself, which I bought over 20 years ago.



Here's some other soldering offers on CPC

Solder Station for £12 :- cpc.farnell.com/dur…rch (note like the mustool iron it is not temperature controlled)



Tenma 60W Digital ESD Soldering Station £45 :- cpc.farnell.com/ten…rch



Hot air 300w rework station £48 :- cpc.farnell.com/dur…rch


8w ! SMD solder station :- cpc.farnell.com/dur…rch
Edited by: "melted" 5th Sep 2017
Following my earlier post, soldering irons are also good for plastic welding, such as cracked plastic car bumpers. No need to buy new or secondhand replacements.
Search YouTube Peters Garage.
Edited by: "Proveright" 5th Sep 2017
I've purchased similar iron in the past. They are all the same just re-branded. The adjusting knob does not work and even in the lowest position the tip glows red hot. It burns everything including wires rendering them useless. I am a cheap fu*k but one thing that I would not use is a *cheap* two pin Chinese soldering iron. I'm emphasising on cheap since China makes good products but this is a waste of money.
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