National Geographic 50/360 Telescope £12 @ Maplin
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National Geographic 50/360 Telescope £12 @ Maplin

£12£3768%Maplin Deals
21
Found 16th Apr
£37 at Amazon with reasonable reviews espically for the price
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thomasleep3 h, 5 m ago

The reviews on amazon seem to suggest problems in focusing on anything, …The reviews on amazon seem to suggest problems in focusing on anything, including the moon. I know it is dirt cheap. Is there anything cheap that would be good for a novice, getting some detail looking at the moon or viewing stars a bit better ?This gets excellent reviews, anybody got a clue if it is good for what I want? https://www.amazon.co.uk/INTEY-Ultra-Clear-Portable-Astronomy-Telescope/dp/B06Y5G4PSF/ref=sr_1_5?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1523896703&sr=1-5&keywords=telescopes+for+astronomy


No, that is horrible and ridiculously overpriced.
So, having established that for £12 you can't get anything better than this (very bad) telescope, here is a copy-paste from my own post on an older topic regarding beginner telescopes:

I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.
21 Comments
Superb value for a starter Telescope for the Kids. Couldn't resist ordering.
I would write about how bad this poor excuse for a telescope is, but it is £12...
I'd probably still not recommend it at £20... but it is £12...
The reviews on amazon seem to suggest problems in focusing on anything, including the moon. I know it is dirt cheap. Is there anything cheap that would be good for a novice, getting some detail looking at the moon or viewing stars a bit better ?
This gets excellent reviews, anybody got a clue if it is good for what I want? amazon.co.uk/INT…omy
Edited by: "thomasleep" 16th Apr
Reckon this is a good buy for £60.
maplin.co.uk/p/c…8xl
If you are near to any of the stores they have stock, then definitely worth the money imo
Reviews do not inspire confidence and seem to guarantee disappointment even at £12
Got this, it's rubbish, don't bother even for £12. Don't even bother for £1.20
Go via the ebay store and you pay no P&P

ebay.co.uk/itm…328
Edited by: "Bades" 16th Apr
Will I be able to use in order to see my neighbour getting undressed of an evening?
Really interested in a good spec telescope for home, would appreciate it if someone knows what’s best to go for, willing to spend £100ish so nothing crazy
thomasleep3 h, 5 m ago

The reviews on amazon seem to suggest problems in focusing on anything, …The reviews on amazon seem to suggest problems in focusing on anything, including the moon. I know it is dirt cheap. Is there anything cheap that would be good for a novice, getting some detail looking at the moon or viewing stars a bit better ?This gets excellent reviews, anybody got a clue if it is good for what I want? https://www.amazon.co.uk/INTEY-Ultra-Clear-Portable-Astronomy-Telescope/dp/B06Y5G4PSF/ref=sr_1_5?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1523896703&sr=1-5&keywords=telescopes+for+astronomy


No, that is horrible and ridiculously overpriced.
So, having established that for £12 you can't get anything better than this (very bad) telescope, here is a copy-paste from my own post on an older topic regarding beginner telescopes:

I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.
thank you so much
This telescope will be £12 worth of disappointment.
ecuador1 h, 2 m ago

No, that is horrible and ridiculously overpriced.So, having established …No, that is horrible and ridiculously overpriced.So, having established that for £12 you can't get anything better than this (very bad) telescope, here is a copy-paste from my own post on an older topic regarding beginner telescopes:I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.


Just curious how binoculars could be better as hand movement would make it near impossible to see anything, also would that not be dangerous to your eyesight? Have you got a link to anything around £50 that would actually be of any use, bear in mind I live in a city center so light pollution would probably make the whole idea redundant? Curious as to why the amazon one is so bad?
ecuador1 h, 3 m ago

No, that is horrible and ridiculously overpriced.So, having established …No, that is horrible and ridiculously overpriced.So, having established that for £12 you can't get anything better than this (very bad) telescope, here is a copy-paste from my own post on an older topic regarding beginner telescopes:I give a yearly talk at my local astronomy club about choosing a telescope with examples at all price ranges, you can see the powerpoint presentation at the bottom of this page. If you are too bored to read that, the lowest cost scopes that I would recommend are the mini-dobsonians like the SkyWatcher Heritage 76 (or even better but less easy to find in the UK the Orion Funscope 76) - still under £50. Although at the under £50 price range binoculars are often a better choice. For a beginner telescope I'd personally aim at the £100 price range (for new - as you can always find something nice for less as second hand) with something like a Heritage 100P.



We have this discussion every time a cheap scope pops up but I'm now changing my mind on these.

Yes it's a pile of junk, it's no good for anything serious but to a child who has asked for a telescope, it looks like a telescope and it will show you the craters on the Moon, planets as disks and show a few magnitudes lower than can be seen with the naked eye.

I love the hobby, I've a 4" refractor myself but as a child I remember saving up my pocket money to buy a £50 Tasco telescope similar to this pile of junk. It was useless but I did see all the above including my first views of Saturn. I've since bought something more serious.

I've loved the hobby for over 40 years, I read listen, watch as many astro things as I can but currently my telescope is in the kitchen with a coat over it. In all honesty, I'll use it a few times per year, usually when an event happens like the opposition of a planet or something I haven't seen before comes into my Southerly view.

This will end up the same. It will get used occasionally but most likely will just take up space and end up with coats over it BUT it may also give a child a hobby for life like it did for me. It is a toy and nothing more but children love toys.

Masliya, for anything serious your talking something decent in the £300+ price bracket. There's a lot of factors in choosing a scope so if you don't know what to look for then I'd suggest you find a local society and turn up on one of there many free observing nights. Ask as many questions as you can but usually bigger is better up to the point that you can't transport or lift the thing. As Ecuador says, a decent pair of binoculars is a much better choice for a first scope. I've 3 pairs myself including a pair of 15x70's which are normally my goto for a quick 10 minute session.

I'm actually gonna vote this deal hot because quite frankly £12 is not a lot of money. It's a toy, nothing more.

One final point, it may be a toy but it can also blind a child or start a fire. Never let your kid point this at the Sun, I once melted an eyepiece projecting the Sun and I should have known better. If my eye were in front of that then I'd be blinded for life. Can't stress this enough.
thomasleep9 m ago

Just curious how binoculars could be better as hand movement would make it …Just curious how binoculars could be better as hand movement would make it near impossible to see anything, also would that not be dangerous to your eyesight? Have you got a link to anything around £50 that would actually be of any use, bear in mind I live in a city center so light pollution would probably make the whole idea redundant? Curious as to why the amazon one is so bad?


Binoculars will have a lower magnification and easy to hold. They are brilliant for sweeping large areas and star clusters but no good for high magnification things like planets. I much prefer my bins even though I own a scope.

For someone experienced I only just caught Mercury for the first time in my life at the start of the month. I found it in my binoculars first before setting my scope up and viewing it through that. Mercury is usually low above the horizon but the way my house is situated I can only get a few opportunities per year to try and spot it. On this occasion it was close to Venus and how I found it but without using my bins first of all, I would never have set my scope up to find it.
GlentoranMark7 m ago

Binoculars will have a lower magnification and easy to hold. They are …Binoculars will have a lower magnification and easy to hold. They are brilliant for sweeping large areas and star clusters but no good for high magnification things like planets. I much prefer my bins even though I own a scope. For someone experienced I only just caught Mercury for the first time in my life at the start of the month. I found it in my binoculars first before setting my scope up and viewing it through that. Mercury is usually low above the horizon but the way my house is situated I can only get a few opportunities per year to try and spot it. On this occasion it was close to Venus and how I found it but without using my bins first of all, I would never have set my scope up to find it.


Holding them steady is an issue, that is why I think a telescope with a tripod would be better but there are so many and unlike a cordless drill there does not seem to be any kind of guide like voltage or Ah
GlentoranMark31 m ago

We have this discussion every time a cheap scope pops up but I'm now …We have this discussion every time a cheap scope pops up but I'm now changing my mind on these. Yes it's a pile of junk, it's no good for anything serious but to a child who has asked for a telescope, it looks like a telescope and it will show you the craters on the Moon, planets as disks and show a few magnitudes lower than can be seen with the naked eye.I love the hobby, I've a 4" refractor myself but as a child I remember saving up my pocket money to buy a £50 Tasco telescope similar to this pile of junk. It was useless but I did see all the above including my first views of Saturn. I've since bought something more serious.I've loved the hobby for over 40 years, I read listen, watch as many astro things as I can but currently my telescope is in the kitchen with a coat over it. In all honesty, I'll use it a few times per year, usually when an event happens like the opposition of a planet or something I haven't seen before comes into my Southerly view. This will end up the same. It will get used occasionally but most likely will just take up space and end up with coats over it BUT it may also give a child a hobby for life like it did for me. It is a toy and nothing more but children love toys.Masliya, for anything serious your talking something decent in the £300+ price bracket. There's a lot of factors in choosing a scope so if you don't know what to look for then I'd suggest you find a local society and turn up on one of there many free observing nights. Ask as many questions as you can but usually bigger is better up to the point that you can't transport or lift the thing. As Ecuador says, a decent pair of binoculars is a much better choice for a first scope. I've 3 pairs myself including a pair of 15x70's which are normally my goto for a quick 10 minute session.I'm actually gonna vote this deal hot because quite frankly £12 is not a lot of money. It's a toy, nothing more.One final point, it may be a toy but it can also blind a child or start a fire. Never let your kid point this at the Sun, I once melted an eyepiece projecting the Sun and I should have known better. If my eye were in front of that then I'd be blinded for life. Can't stress this enough.


Thank you for taking the trouble to go into the detail you have. I think the bottom line for me would be a good pair of binoculars and possibly try to find some kind of tripod or stand for them, the bonus would be using them to spot wildlife close up.
thomasleep5 h, 45 m ago

The reviews on amazon seem to suggest problems in focusing on anything, …The reviews on amazon seem to suggest problems in focusing on anything, including the moon. I know it is dirt cheap. Is there anything cheap that would be good for a novice, getting some detail looking at the moon or viewing stars a bit better ?This gets excellent reviews, anybody got a clue if it is good for what I want? https://www.amazon.co.uk/INTEY-Ultra-Clear-Portable-Astronomy-Telescope/dp/B06Y5G4PSF/ref=sr_1_5?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1523896703&sr=1-5&keywords=telescopes+for+astronomy


Looks good and will be on Lightning Deal for £50.99 from 5:20pm on Tuesday 17 April
For every one kid that got a flimsy-tripod based little refractor and yet persevered despite how frustrating it was to point it, there are 10 that give up. Until perhaps 25-30 years ago, if you were on a budget you didn't have a choice, you couldn't avoid it. I was one of the minority who persevered (I got a 40mm "halleyscope", with a ridiculous "tripod" 30 years ago next month), yay for me, however in this day there is a choice.
So, as I said before, for £12, I don't have to propose anything better (which is why I don't actually downvote this), and you are getting an interesting toy (it will work fine on the moon). If that's your budget go for it. It won't be a joy to use compared to other scopes that start at around ~£50 (although I usually give £100 as the starting point for new - but less for used), so you might turn some kids away. Your call
Edited by: "ecuador" 17th Apr
now the price got rise to 16£..
I can't believe we are suggesting binoculars instead of telescopes, these must be truly awful if that's the case!
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