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Nest® Protect 2nd Generation Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarm, Battery / wired £79.49 The Electrical Showroom
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Nest® Protect 2nd Generation Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarm, Battery / wired £79.49 The Electrical Showroom

59
Posted 5th AugEdited by:"cprasad"

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Wired : electrical-showroom.co.uk/ind…red

Battery : electrical-showroom.co.uk/ind…ery

The latest incarnation of smart alarms, the hard-wired Nest Protect Second Generation Wireless Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm is a convenient and non-intrusive way to keep your home safe.

A speedy response can be a life or death matter, which is why the Nest Protect is the first smoke alarm that detects all types of fire.

It does this by analysing two different wavelengths of light, so you'll be alerted to both slow burning and fast burning fires.

The Heads-Up early warning function tells you early on when the presence of smoke is detected, or if carbon monoxide levels are rising.

The unit lights up yellow and speaks with a human voice to keep you informed.

You'll even get a message on your smartphone or tablet if the smoke or carbon monoxide alarm is triggered, so you can keep tabs on your home and react to situations quickly and efficiently.
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I have 3 of these, and they are well worth it compared to a cheap one -

*They give you a pre-warning if it detects low levels of smoke, before engaging a full alarm
*They are motion sensitive and light your path at night
*They self test on a schedule, in addition to manual testing
*The alarm speaks and tells you what sort of alarm it is and where e.g. there is smoke in the kitchen
*They synchronise with Nest thermostats, to give greater accuracy around when you are out to turn off the heating, and if there is a carbon monoxide leak, will turn off the boiler if it is happening in that room
59 Comments
Excellent bit of kit and good price. The battery versions will last many years on a single set of decent batteries
looks like a great bit of kit.
Last time ordered a battery one they sent me wired. Had to go back and forth for quite some time before ending up getting a refund. Wasn't the best of experiences with this company.
Great thing... but still overpriced IMHO.

Normal alarm cost about £20, so £60 extra for connection to Nest seems a bit steep.
On the other hand it looks co much better than normal alarms.
Noveed05/08/2019 10:19

Last time ordered a battery one they sent me wired. Had to go back and …Last time ordered a battery one they sent me wired. Had to go back and forth for quite some time before ending up getting a refund. Wasn't the best of experiences with this company.


I don't suppose you happened to note the manufacturer date of the unit you received?
I'm waiting to get these but don't want to order online only to be delivered a unit with ~8 years lifetime left.
spamabsorbed05/08/2019 10:29

Great thing... but still overpriced IMHO. Normal alarm cost about £20, so …Great thing... but still overpriced IMHO. Normal alarm cost about £20, so £60 extra for connection to Nest seems a bit steep.On the other hand it looks co much better than normal alarms.


I agree, only problem is most smoke alarms look hideous. I have renovated my house top to bottom and want something aesthetically pleasing so glad to see the mains ones appear here. Can you link together mains and battery as would like 3 devices but only have two wired locations in the typical place (top and bottom of stairs).
BigManDave05/08/2019 10:41

I don't suppose you happened to note the manufacturer date of the unit you …I don't suppose you happened to note the manufacturer date of the unit you received?I'm waiting to get these but don't want to order online only to be delivered a unit with ~8 years lifetime left.



I believe it was either August 2018 or October 2018 and I ordered the alarm the last time this was on offer in April - hotukdeals.com/dea…015
spamabsorbed05/08/2019 10:29

Great thing... but still overpriced IMHO. Normal alarm cost about £20, so …Great thing... but still overpriced IMHO. Normal alarm cost about £20, so £60 extra for connection to Nest seems a bit steep.On the other hand it looks co much better than normal alarms.



But a normal/most alarm will take like 8-9 mins of smoke before it goes off this takes around 5 mins (Link here). So it is true what they said you get what you pay for.

What worries me. I have heard is the Nest protect has a mic in it (they say it is disabled) but the company is owned by google so they may be listening to everything you say.
Does this detect changes in heat or is this just for smoke and carbon monoxide?
Imran_Razaq05/08/2019 11:02

Does this detect changes in heat or is this just for smoke and carbon …Does this detect changes in heat or is this just for smoke and carbon monoxide?


As per OP's Deal Description:

"It does this by analysing two different wavelengths of light, so you'll be alerted to both slow burning and fast burning fires."

That would be for fire though.

Carbon monoxide detection detector's usually have a different 'element' in them, monitoring different thing's altogether, like eg. the toxicity of the poisonous carbon dioxide gases * around you/around it, etc.

Simply put, there's basically two very different technologies (performing two veryyyyy different functions, etc etc etc, altogether), built into one here. :-)


Edit:

* I meant carbon monoxide, not carbon dioxide.

(As they too, are clearly two very different gases too, etc, lol, with two veryyyyy different levels of detrimental toxicity within them individually, within their own right, or whatever? - of which/hand's down, carbon monoxide is by far the most potent of those two, regardless).

Stupid predictive texts on my phone ... loooool).
Edited by: "amour3k" 5th Aug
For those that have one of these, I'm moving to a new apto (it's a Victorian tenemant flat) and can't remember if there was an alarm in the kitchen (sure there was) but defo one in the hall. The whole flat needs a rewire and everything doing to it.

Is it best to get two wired or battery for something like this? Would use proper batteries to be on the safe side if battery is best. Thanks in advance.
cheaperbythe1205/08/2019 12:07

For those that have one of these, I'm moving to a new apto (it's a …For those that have one of these, I'm moving to a new apto (it's a Victorian tenemant flat) and can't remember if there was an alarm in the kitchen (sure there was) but defo one in the hall. The whole flat needs a rewire and everything doing to it.Is it best to get two wired or battery for something like this? Would use proper batteries to be on the safe side if battery is best. Thanks in advance.



If you are rewire go with the Wired version. the wired ver has a battery also as a back up incase of powercuts.
Also if u where to rent it out i am sure fire alarms have to be wired in. also makes scene when doing a rewire to wire them up as in the furture you may want to change brands and you will have the wired connection already there.
Edited by: "Mackan" 5th Aug
Mackan05/08/2019 12:12

If you are rewire go with the Wired version. the wired ver has a battery …If you are rewire go with the Wired version. the wired ver has a battery also as a back up incase of powercuts.



Thanks. Probably best to keep the one in the hall as well, just case? So one for kitchen, and one for hall (it's quite a big flat at about 150sq m). Tia.
cheaperbythe1205/08/2019 12:14

Thanks. Probably best to keep the one in the hall as well, just case? So …Thanks. Probably best to keep the one in the hall as well, just case? So one for kitchen, and one for hall (it's quite a big flat at about 150sq m). Tia.



I would have on the Kitchen, one in the hall (if connected to the kitchen) and one in each bed room if it is a big flat.
i think they say you should have one in each of the main room in the house as fire can start in any location.

P.S i would also have them linked together (if 1 goes off they all go off)


My set up is below red ones are linked together, the yellow one it is just a normal one that the local fire department installed
My flat is on ground floor with every windows can be used as a exit.

38212422-h5ZoM.jpg
Edited by: "Mackan" 5th Aug
Mackan05/08/2019 12:12

If you are rewire go with the Wired version. the wired ver has a battery …If you are rewire go with the Wired version. the wired ver has a battery also as a back up incase of powercuts.


Useful advice there, so the wired one is clearly better then. :-)

cheaperbythe1205/08/2019 12:07

For those that have one of these, I'm moving to a new apto (it's a …For those that have one of these, I'm moving to a new apto (it's a Victorian tenemant flat) and can't remember if there was an alarm in the kitchen (sure there was) but defo one in the hall. The whole flat needs a rewire and everything doing to it.Is it best to get two wired or battery for something like this? Would use proper batteries to be on the safe side if battery is best. Thanks in advance.


Aren't Victorian buildings (and suchlike), Grade A, or Grade B 'listed buildings' in some way, or something?.

Place's like that are always in need of a certain 'something' doing to them, eg. a lick of paint, ancient timber framework needing 'updating', and ... (etc etc etc).

Be a wee bit careful as to why you alter + as to how much of the 'altering' also, etc?.

On account of certain obvious (+ maybe not so obvious), reasons too, or whatever?.

Nonetheless, all the best in your D.I.Y. marksmanship though. :-)
Edited by: "amour3k" 5th Aug
Bear in mind that CO detectors only have a life expectancy of up to 10 years from manufacture (Electrochemical), after that you have to throw them away.
If it is Biobimetic this will only be a maximum of 6 years, If semiconductor only 5 years, and requires heating to 400 deg C, if Opto-Chemical, then one shot, but unlikely to be this as it is the least reliable at detection.
So at most your only going to get 10 years life out of this.
Mackan05/08/2019 12:17

I would have on the Kitchen, one in the hall (if connected to the kitchen) …I would have on the Kitchen, one in the hall (if connected to the kitchen) and one in each bed room if it is a big flat.i think they say you should have one in each of the main room in the house as fire can start in any location. P.S i would also have them linked togther (if 1 goes off they all go off)



Cool, thanks. Yikes, that's a bit expensive if I need to buy more than two lol. 4 bed apto - tho one will be a home office..
amour3k05/08/2019 12:19

Useful advice there, so the wired one is clearly better then. :-)Aren't …Useful advice there, so the wired one is clearly better then. :-)Aren't Victorian buildings (and suchlike), Grade A, or Grade B 'listed buildings' in some way, or something?.Place's like that are always in need of a certain 'something' doing to them, eg. a lick of paint, ancient timber framework needing 'updating', and ... (etc etc etc).Be a wee bit careful as to why you alter + as to how much of the 'altering' also, etc?.On account of certain obvious (+ maybe not so obvious), reasons too, or whatever?.Nonetheless, all the best in your D.I.Y. marksmanship though. :-)



Fortunately, ours is not listed or in a conservation area. The property was renovated 20 years ago and what a horrific job they did, hence it will be one helluva renovation job of which most of it my dad and I will be doing - leave plumbing and electrics to the pro's but everything else we'll be doing. My dad has done both kitchen fitting and tiling back in the day and my best mate is a (very good) plasterer and I enjoy all the decoration stuff so between us we're all kinda handy. However, wish us luck!
Been looking for one of these smart detectors, is anyone aware of a similar smoke detector that can send alerts on mobile?
Thanks
cheaperbythe1205/08/2019 12:45

Fortunately, ours is not listed or in a conservation area. The property …Fortunately, ours is not listed or in a conservation area. The property was renovated 20 years ago and what a horrific job they did, hence it will be one helluva renovation job of which most of it my dad and I will be doing - leave plumbing and electrics to the pro's but everything else we'll be doing. My dad has done both kitchen fitting and tiling back in the day and my best mate is a (very good) plasterer and I enjoy all the decoration stuff so between us we're all kinda handy. However, wish us luck!


How unfortunate, but at the same time, goooood for you guys as well also (not bad at all).

And yes, all the best with allllll of that too, etc. :-D
Smoke alarms are free from the Fire Service and you can get carbon monoxide detectors for about £10-£15.. This is far from a good deal
cheaperbythe1205/08/2019 12:07

For those that have one of these, I'm moving to a new apto (it's a …For those that have one of these, I'm moving to a new apto (it's a Victorian tenemant flat) and can't remember if there was an alarm in the kitchen (sure there was) but defo one in the hall. The whole flat needs a rewire and everything doing to it.Is it best to get two wired or battery for something like this? Would use proper batteries to be on the safe side if battery is best. Thanks in advance.


Building regs now state that smoke alarms must hardwired in new build properties and in properties that are being refurbished.
gary33305/08/2019 10:47

I agree, only problem is most smoke alarms look hideous. I have renovated …I agree, only problem is most smoke alarms look hideous. I have renovated my house top to bottom and want something aesthetically pleasing so glad to see the mains ones appear here. Can you link together mains and battery as would like 3 devices but only have two wired locations in the typical place (top and bottom of stairs).


You can link together wired and battery and a mixture of gen1 and gen 2 models, what I like about these is that they can announce in each location where the fire is, so if there is a fire in the kitchen it will announce this in the bedrooms or living room etc and send a notification to your phone. Also through the nest heating app they can also switch off your boiler if carbon monoxide is detected.
Edited by: "scarl" 5th Aug
So you can tell when you are at work your place is burning down? Seems a little like after the horse has bolted..
FireBIade20005/08/2019 15:00

So you can tell when you are at work your place is burning down? Seems a …So you can tell when you are at work your place is burning down? Seems a little like after the horse has bolted..


Yes, or as happened to me, a phone charger shorted and started to smoke, I got the notification when I was out shopping, got home pretty quick, place not burning down and the horse happily lazy around. Meanwhile fire brigade toasting marshmallows outside your gaff
the night light function of this gadget pays for itself tbh!
Overpriced for a life saving device I mean I would need 3 of these at least.
Edited by: "Dizy" 5th Aug
Tibrocks05/08/2019 13:36

Been looking for one of these smart detectors, is anyone aware of a …Been looking for one of these smart detectors, is anyone aware of a similar smoke detector that can send alerts on mobile? Thanks


This one. Both battery and wired versions connect up to internet and report back via the Nest app on any configured notifications.
When the smoke starts having children, it's time to quit smoking
Dizy05/08/2019 15:21

Overpriced for a life saving device I mean I would need 3 of these at …Overpriced for a life saving device I mean I would need 3 of these at least.


What price do you put on life then?
I have 3 of these, and they are well worth it compared to a cheap one -

*They give you a pre-warning if it detects low levels of smoke, before engaging a full alarm
*They are motion sensitive and light your path at night
*They self test on a schedule, in addition to manual testing
*The alarm speaks and tells you what sort of alarm it is and where e.g. there is smoke in the kitchen
*They synchronise with Nest thermostats, to give greater accuracy around when you are out to turn off the heating, and if there is a carbon monoxide leak, will turn off the boiler if it is happening in that room
jaybayley05/08/2019 15:40

What price do you put on life then?


In his defence, be could get several normal alarms (and still have money left over) for the price of one of these. I agree with him that these are still too expensive as they only have a 10yr shelf life and they're is no away of knowing how long these have been say on the shelf
jaybayley05/08/2019 15:40

What price do you put on life then?


Not all of us have a lot of money my point being it should never be this expensive for a smoke detector.

By the way the fire brigade can fit you them for free not nest ones if anyone is interested.
Edited by: "Dizy" 5th Aug
maxamus00705/08/2019 16:58

In his defence, be could get several normal alarms (and still have money …In his defence, be could get several normal alarms (and still have money left over) for the price of one of these. I agree with him that these are still too expensive as they only have a 10yr shelf life and they're is no away of knowing how long these have been say on the shelf


its about choice and affordabulity really. if you are a geek, prefer the best tech or just like the night light this is for you.
Nothing like getting a beep on your phone to say your house has burnt down when you're sitting on the beach thousands of miles away.
Good price but not enough for me to bite. A for Effort
Andrew_Cichocki05/08/2019 12:21

Bear in mind that CO detectors only have a life expectancy of up to 10 …Bear in mind that CO detectors only have a life expectancy of up to 10 years from manufacture (Electrochemical), after that you have to throw them away.If it is Biobimetic this will only be a maximum of 6 years, If semiconductor only 5 years, and requires heating to 400 deg C, if Opto-Chemical, then one shot, but unlikely to be this as it is the least reliable at detection.So at most your only going to get 10 years life out of this.



If you could replace the sensors I'd consider these. But with several alarms in my house, reluctant to replace them with Nest knowing i'd have to do it again within 10 years. I guess they'd probably be a lot cheaper in 10 years time.
Thanks for posting @cprasad we have added this to the Highlights section
ron.s.london05/08/2019 16:11

I have 3 of these, and they are well worth it compared to a cheap one - …I have 3 of these, and they are well worth it compared to a cheap one - *They give you a pre-warning if it detects low levels of smoke, before engaging a full alarm *They are motion sensitive and light your path at night*They self test on a schedule, in addition to manual testing*The alarm speaks and tells you what sort of alarm it is and where e.g. there is smoke in the kitchen*They synchronise with Nest thermostats, to give greater accuracy around when you are out to turn off the heating, and if there is a carbon monoxide leak, will turn off the boiler if it is happening in that room


This is the best comment on this thread. I was sceptical but the final point has me very interested now and I might just replace them all with 3 of these. Thanks!
£80???
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