NETGEAR RBK30 and 2 x RBW30 Orbi Whole Home Mesh Wi-Fi System £199.99 at Amazon
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NETGEAR RBK30 and 2 x RBW30 Orbi Whole Home Mesh Wi-Fi System £199.99 at Amazon

£199.99Amazon Deals
11
Found 7th Apr
  • Single network name; one Wi-Fi name and seamless roaming for your whole home to enjoy




  • Your home and garden covered; this kit of three covers up to 5000 sq feet with high-performance AC2200 Wi-Fi




  • Maximum internet speeds; tri-band Wi-Fi helps deliver fast internet speeds even as more devices connect




  • Simple and secure; use the Orbi app or a web browser to create secure whole home Wi-Fi in minutes; with no accounts to set up




  • Compatible with Amazon Echo/Alexa - control your home network using voice commands
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malhal1 h, 25 m ago

Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they …Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.


That's like, um, so not true.... These things run at way above the speed of your internet connection at the hub device. The bottle neck is your broadband service.
12 Comments
Excellent kit - solved al my WiFI problems. Great price. Hot
Tempted by this! Is there much difference between this and the RBK50
Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.
malhal1 h, 25 m ago

Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they …Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.


That's like, um, so not true.... These things run at way above the speed of your internet connection at the hub device. The bottle neck is your broadband service.
Is this exceptionally better than the BT whole wifi thing?
malhal1 h, 29 m ago

Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they …Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.



Fake news!
I have this. Technically it's not mesh. I have very high throughput everywhere now. The only downside is that it doesn't transfer tour device from one node to the other very well.
malhal1 h, 34 m ago

Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they …Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.


This is not true for this device. It has a dedicated backhaul channel to prevent this.
vector87247th Apr

Tempted by this! Is there much difference between this and the RBK50


So the nodes are slightly less powerful but more importantly don't have LAN ports.
malhal1 h, 48 m ago

Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they …Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.


PleaseDon't give advice ever again
malhal2 h, 44 m ago

Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they …Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.


My advice is to move on from WaveLAN, about the only wireless standard where this would make any sense.
Original Poster
malhal12 h, 16 m ago

Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they …Although mesh networks can be very useful for very large areas, they usually can’t provide the speeds or throughput that a traditional wireless network can. When a mesh node connects wirelessly to another node, the throughput can be cut in half, so making two hops could cut throughput down to about a ¼ of what it is at the source. If your Internet connection provides speeds of 15 Mbps, devices connected to a mesh node that has to make two wireless hops will get 4 Mbps or less speeds.


I think you're talking about repeaters. I'm signed up to 50mbs and with the Orbi I get 55mbs all over my home now.
Edited by: "jjabbar" 9th Apr
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