New MEADE Polaris 76 EQ Reflector Telescope - Blue £58.29 @ Curry - PCworld eBay - Free delivery
245°Expired

New MEADE Polaris 76 EQ Reflector Telescope - Blue £58.29 @ Curry - PCworld eBay - Free delivery

15
Found 21st Apr
Great price for this, over £114 anywhere else, including instore at Currys.

Key Features

Experience the wonders of the night sky from your bedroom window or garden shed with the Meade Polaris 76 EQ Reflector Telescope.

Pre-constructed for easy set up

The telescope comes pre-built, with an included tripod, straight out of the box so you start exploring the heavens as soon as you like.

Two high quality eyepieces

There's one low and high power eyepiece included with the Polaris 76 EQ Reflector Telescope so you view celestial objects and phenomena.

Slow motion controls

Explore the sky with ease thanks to the slow motion controls, allowing you to track the object you are viewing in great detail.

Discover over 10,000 celestial objects with the included Autostar Suite Astronomy planetarium DVD (for Windows).

  • Focal length: 700 mm
  • Focal ratio: 9.2
  • Mount: Equatorial
  • Type: Telescope
  • Objective lens diameter: 76 mm
  • Field of view: Varies with each eyepiece
  • Eyepiece 1: 6.3 mm
  • Eyepiece 2: 26 mm
  • Mount: German equatorial with slow-motion controls
  • Motor drive: No
  • Coated optics: Yes
  • No
  • Fogproof: No
  • Database: 10,000 object database
  • Colour: Blue
  • Box contents: Meade Polaris 76 EQ Reflector Telescope, 6.3 mm & 26 mm 1.25" Eyepieces, Barlow Lens x2, Pre-assembled Tripod with Accessory Tray, Autostar Suite Astronomy DVD
  • Meade Polaris 76 EQ Reflector Telescope, 6.3 mm & 26 mm 1.25" Eyepieces, Barlow Lens x2, Pre-assembled Tripod with Accessory Tray, Autostar Suite Astronomy DVD: 771 g
  • 771 g
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It is easy. Pop into your local Freemason lodge, tell them you would like to deceive and influence people, eventually when you reach 28th degree and you will be told you were deceived last 20 years, and only now real teachings will take place and you will have to re-learn all 7 liberal arts... The last one will be astronomy, and after many stupid rituals and few hallucinogenic intoxications you might be offered to join a real boys club where you find out again that all you ever knew about the world and outer space was a lie. They will explain you why this all lie is needed, how it governs the mind of the servants, bellitelment, new religion etc...etc... Well... How its all got started with my curiosity to learn the sky. So do yourself a favour, just join your local fairytale astronomy club, they will make you feel very clever. Their bullshit is astronomical, trust me, lol.
15 Comments
Not a bad scope to get into astronomy but you may soon want to upgrade this, especially the star finder scope. There are tons of 2nd hand bargains for people looking to get into astronomy, join a local astronomical group and ask around, but for back garden fun this is a good price for a decent branded scope. Heat added.
schall819 m ago

Not a bad scope to get into astronomy but you may soon want to upgrade …Not a bad scope to get into astronomy but you may soon want to upgrade this, especially the star finder scope. There are tons of 2nd hand bargains for people looking to get into astronomy, join a local astronomical group and ask around, but for back garden fun this is a good price for a decent branded scope. Heat added.


Could you please let me know how to join the group?
It is easy. Pop into your local Freemason lodge, tell them you would like to deceive and influence people, eventually when you reach 28th degree and you will be told you were deceived last 20 years, and only now real teachings will take place and you will have to re-learn all 7 liberal arts... The last one will be astronomy, and after many stupid rituals and few hallucinogenic intoxications you might be offered to join a real boys club where you find out again that all you ever knew about the world and outer space was a lie. They will explain you why this all lie is needed, how it governs the mind of the servants, bellitelment, new religion etc...etc... Well... How its all got started with my curiosity to learn the sky. So do yourself a favour, just join your local fairytale astronomy club, they will make you feel very clever. Their bullshit is astronomical, trust me, lol.
OOS
I like the description it comes prebuilt, do they usual come in bits, like IKEA?
which can see the moon better?

nikon p900 superzoom camera.
or
this telescope?
RedDemonic26 m ago

which can see the moon better? nikon p900 superzoom camera.orthis …which can see the moon better? nikon p900 superzoom camera.orthis telescope?



Not sure but the focal ratio of 9.2 makes this telescope decent for viewing planets and the moon. I lack the motivation to do your comparison for you though. Try google.
I own both Meade LX200 10inch and Nikon P900 and for moon obervations Nikon is the way to go because of every possible reason. My fellows brothers designed telesopes in such a way, that their focal lengh is ridiculously small and cost a fortune. It is all by design, so anly elite can afford a good quality telescope. There is a slim chance that peasants would ever start questioning reality around them anyway, but they dont like to take a chance in this pseudo-science age aka one unifying religion of the world.

Back to the answer, Nikon will have better focal lengh (optical real zoom 2000mm) than most telescopes under 1-2k, also it does have x4 digital zoom which is very good. So it would be equal to 8000mm telescope. While 5£k-20k Meade will have 4400mm zoom. Of course zooming on other sky lights, things known to the public as stars/planets, telescope will let more light in and you will have sharper image. For the cost and convienience go for Nikon P900 ONLY.
Sold out
BorntobeGODagain1 h, 54 m ago

I own both Meade LX200 10inch and Nikon P900 and for moon obervations …I own both Meade LX200 10inch and Nikon P900 and for moon obervations Nikon is the way to go because of every possible reason. My fellows brothers designed telesopes in such a way, that their focal lengh is ridiculously small and cost a fortune. It is all by design, so anly elite can afford a good quality telescope. There is a slim chance that peasants would ever start questioning reality around them anyway, but they dont like to take a chance in this pseudo-science age aka one unifying religion of the world.Back to the answer, Nikon will have better focal lengh (optical real zoom 2000mm) than most telescopes under 1-2k, also it does have x4 digital zoom which is very good. So it would be equal to 8000mm telescope. While 5£k-20k Meade will have 4400mm zoom. Of course zooming on other sky lights, things known to the public as stars/planets, telescope will let more light in and you will have sharper image. For the cost and convienience go for Nikon P900 ONLY.


Huh. This post is so wrong, I have no idea where to start from. And I am sure the poster would not understand, hence just posting for others that might be wondering what's all this about.
So, first of all, the resolution of an optical system, i.e. the maximum quality you can get out of it if everything else is perfect, is limited by your aperture. The Nikon P900 has a 55mm aperture, so whatever you do, if you have a 60mm+ telescope of good quality, an imaging sensor as good as the one the P900 uses (not hard to find nowadays) will give you better quality images, because... physics.
On to the focal length. I don't really understand what the above post is trying to say, but in general, astronomers, especially amateur ones, would love to have good telescopes of short focal length that are also affordable, but because a shorter focal length for the same aperture requires the light to bend more, it is much harder & expensive to make. The smaller focal length gives you a wider field of view and also requires shorter exposures in astrophotography, while it is relatively easy to increase your effective focal length (e.g. with a TeleVue barlow or Powermate) so you can do most things longer focal length scopes would do.
But there is some misconception about what "equivalent focal length is". In fact, it doesn't have to do with the focal length itself, it simply gives you an idea of your field of view - i.e. your frame - so that photographers can compare it to their old 35mm film, because if you have a tiny sensor with the same lens, that tiny sensor would crop your image and you end up with a smaller field of view. In fact, the P900 has a 357mm focal length physically. The 10" LX200 mentioned has a 2500mm focal length, which means that with the same sensor items will be 7x larger than the P900. The 10" LX200 has a "35mm equivalent" focal length with that sensor of 14000mm !!! In fact, having a smaller sensor is a bad thing, not a good thing, as with a larger sensor you fit more things in your view, which seems like a smaller "zoom" if you print them at the same size, but a larger sensor (of the same generation) will maintain the quality, so if you cropped the smaller part and blew it up you would still get the image of the smaller sensor.
It gets a bit complicated, but the result is that even at the price of the P900 you can certainly beat it in quality for moonshots with a combination of telescope/camera. For example take a look at a lunar image through the worst telescope I own (a 130mm newtonian - about £100 for the tube) with a £150 planetary camera (see it full size here): 33674922-ip9ax.jpg
You can't get that quality with a P900, but with the telescope you need to have a mount, a small tripod won't do, plus with the planetary camera you get more clarity, but it requires to connect a pc and then processing to get all that detail (stacking, sharpening). So I would suggest the P900 for everyone who would like to point and click and get good shots. Just know that telescopes are a whole different thing both in complexity and potential results. If you already have a DSLR, a telescope is also a consideration since you can use your existing DSLR with it - but the telescope in this topic wasn't any good for that.
Edited by: "ecuador" 21st Apr
borntobeGOD3 h, 44 m ago

It is easy. Pop into your local Freemason lodge, tell them you would like …It is easy. Pop into your local Freemason lodge, tell them you would like to deceive and influence people, eventually when you reach 28th degree and you will be told you were deceived last 20 years, and only now real teachings will take place and you will have to re-learn all 7 liberal arts... The last one will be astronomy, and after many stupid rituals and few hallucinogenic intoxications you might be offered to join a real boys club where you find out again that all you ever knew about the world and outer space was a lie. They will explain you why this all lie is needed, how it governs the mind of the servants, bellitelment, new religion etc...etc... Well... How its all got started with my curiosity to learn the sky. So do yourself a favour, just join your local fairytale astronomy club, they will make you feel very clever. Their bullshit is astronomical, trust me, lol.


Copypasta?
Buy good binocular firstly as first step with astronomy for beginners eg Williams optics 10x50 ED or if you have more money Fujinion 10x50 FMRT-SX and also very good astronomy atlas with universe/sky map... do not waste your money for poor “telescopes”!
Edited by: "_taurus_" 21st Apr
Now out of stock, so I'll expire.
Edited by: "peter1969uk" 21st Apr
ecuador21st Apr

Huh. This post is so wrong, I have no idea where to start from. And I am …Huh. This post is so wrong, I have no idea where to start from. And I am sure the poster would not understand, hence just posting for others that might be wondering what's all this about.So, first of all, the resolution of an optical system, i.e. the maximum quality you can get out of it if everything else is perfect, is limited by your aperture. The Nikon P900 has a 55mm aperture, so whatever you do, if you have a 60mm+ telescope of good quality, an imaging sensor as good as the one the P900 uses (not hard to find nowadays) will give you better quality images, because... physics. On to the focal length. I don't really understand what the above post is trying to say, but in general, astronomers, especially amateur ones, would love to have good telescopes of short focal length that are also affordable, but because a shorter focal length for the same aperture requires the light to bend more, it is much harder & expensive to make. The smaller focal length gives you a wider field of view and also requires shorter exposures in astrophotography, while it is relatively easy to increase your effective focal length (e.g. with a TeleVue barlow or Powermate) so you can do most things longer focal length scopes would do.But there is some misconception about what "equivalent focal length is". In fact, it doesn't have to do with the focal length itself, it simply gives you an idea of your field of view - i.e. your frame - so that photographers can compare it to their old 35mm film, because if you have a tiny sensor with the same lens, that tiny sensor would crop your image and you end up with a smaller field of view. In fact, the P900 has a 357mm focal length physically. The 10" LX200 mentioned has a 2500mm focal length, which means that with the same sensor items will be 7x larger than the P900. The 10" LX200 has a "35mm equivalent" focal length with that sensor of 14000mm !!! In fact, having a smaller sensor is a bad thing, not a good thing, as with a larger sensor you fit more things in your view, which seems like a smaller "zoom" if you print them at the same size, but a larger sensor (of the same generation) will maintain the quality, so if you cropped the smaller part and blew it up you would still get the image of the smaller sensor.It gets a bit complicated, but the result is that even at the price of the P900 you can certainly beat it in quality for moonshots with a combination of telescope/camera. For example take a look at a lunar image through the worst telescope I own (a 130mm newtonian - about £100 for the tube) with a £150 planetary camera (see it full size here): [Image] You can't get that quality with a P900, but with the telescope you need to have a mount, a small tripod won't do, plus with the planetary camera you get more clarity, but it requires to connect a pc and then processing to get all that detail (stacking, sharpening). So I would suggest the P900 for everyone who would like to point and click and get good shots. Just know that telescopes are a whole different thing both in complexity and potential results. If you already have a DSLR, a telescope is also a consideration since you can use your existing DSLR with it - but the telescope in this topic wasn't any good for that.


You just put me right off astronomy
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