NEW QUEEN ELIZABETH II £5 COIN - £5 @ Westminster Collection
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NEW QUEEN ELIZABETH II £5 COIN - £5 @ Westminster Collection

23
Found 25th Feb 2016
This year Her Majesty the Queen turns 90 years old - the only monarch in British history to do so. To mark this special occasion a new £5 coin has been released - and if you order today it can be yours for just its face value - £5 for £5 POSTFREE.

The coin features a specially commissioned, one-year-only 90th birthday obverse portrait by artist Luigi Badia, and is fully approved by Her Majesty and Buckingham Palace.
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23 Comments
Its a useless Jersey coin, from a crap company
anthony712

Its a useless Jersey coin, from a crap company



spot on
With all the recent news about these coins not being legal tender, i think not!
Just remember even banks don't have to accept this commemorative coins. So you might be throwing your money away. Unless of course you just want to collect them. See this article for more info
pablobanez

With all the recent news about these coins not being legal tender, i … With all the recent news about these coins not being legal tender, i think not!


It's legal tender in Jersey.
...and if you don't want to collect a crapton of further coin tat, spam and harassment don't let this company have your details!
kani10

This year Her Majesty the Queen turns 90 years old



Bit presumptuous...
Thistleno1

Bit presumptuous...



Read a piece yesterday about the UK's so-called constitution. The author astutely pointed out that old Liz had effectively abdicated her responsibilities by allowing EU courts to have supremacy over our own.

Still, it was good to see her actually earning all those millions by doing her duty as head of state and preventing Bliar from taking us into an illegal war in Iraq.

Oh wait.
matthew_legend

Just remember even banks don't have to accept this commemorative coins.



If I was a bank I wouldn't want to take it either. Landfill is expensive don't you know?
500,000 squid notes for sale for £500,000 each, free postage, legal tender in monopoly land...

As you cannot use these 'coins' they should be described as fake coins or toy coins! How can they (and the Royal Mint) be allowed to continue selling them under the pretence they have a value of whatever they stamp on them? Blatant fraud!
Edited by: "rckl88" 25th Feb 2016
Hot deals should add a 'cryogenic' tab under 'cold' whenever a deal is posted for this company X)
LandOfConfusion

Read a piece yesterday about the UK's so-called constitution. The author … Read a piece yesterday about the UK's so-called constitution. The author astutely pointed out that old Liz had effectively abdicated her responsibilities by allowing EU courts to have supremacy over our own.Still, it was good to see her actually earning all those millions by doing her duty as head of state and preventing Bliar from taking us into an illegal war in Iraq. Oh wait.



​Get off your soap box. No one's listening.
£5 for a £5 coin, seems a bit steep!
a con, no legal tender anymore. In the past could have been exchanged at the bank if not needed anymore. Reakl value is only few pennies
matthew_legend

Just remember even banks don't have to accept this commemorative coins. … Just remember even banks don't have to accept this commemorative coins. So you might be throwing your money away. Unless of course you just want to collect them. See this article for more info


Interesting article. As I understand it, legal tender means the coin/note must be accepted in the repayment of a debt and if you refuse to accept it then the debt is cleared. This leaves a very bad situation if people must accept something which they then cannot pass on.
CountFilth

Interesting article. As I understand it, legal tender means the coin/note … Interesting article. As I understand it, legal tender means the coin/note must be accepted in the repayment of a debt and if you refuse to accept it then the debt is cleared. This leaves a very bad situation if people must accept something which they then cannot pass on.



​That's an interesting point. Then I could go into my bank and say that I want to pay off my mortgage, all I Queen Elizabeth I l 80th birthday £5 coins - they refuse to accept and bish bosh my debt us paid off?
pill

​That's an interesting point. Then I could go into my bank and say that I … ​That's an interesting point. Then I could go into my bank and say that I want to pay off my mortgage, all I Queen Elizabeth I l 80th birthday £5 coins - they refuse to accept and bish bosh my debt us paid off?



No, because despite having Liz' Windsor's mug on them they're not legal tender in the UK.

Otherwise:

"And fans of wacky ways to protest can take heart from one thing: £1 and £2 coins are legal tender up to any amount you like. Even if they're frozen in ice or put in a bathtub full of honey.

What coins can you pay with:

1p - for any amount not exceeding 20p
2p - for any amount not exceeding 20p
5p - for any amount not exceeding £5
10p - for any amount not exceeding £5
20p - for any amount not exceeding £10
50p - for any amount not exceeding £10
£1 - for any amount
£2 - for any amount
"

Source.
spanner79

£5 for a £5 coin, seems a bit steep!


More like £5 for a £0 coin!
what if she dies on the 20th April
finnmaccool

​Get off your soap box. No one's listening.



​I am!
LandOfConfusion

No, because despite having Liz' Windsor's mug on them they're not legal … No, because despite having Liz' Windsor's mug on them they're not legal tender in the UK.Otherwise:"And fans of wacky ways to protest can take heart from one thing: £1 and £2 coins are legal tender up to any amount you like. Even if they're frozen in ice or put in a bathtub full of honey.What coins can you pay with: 1p - for any amount not exceeding 20p 2p - for any amount not exceeding 20p 5p - for any amount not exceeding £5 10p - for any amount not exceeding £5 20p - for any amount not exceeding £10 50p - for any amount not exceeding £10 £1 - for any amount £2 - for any amount"Source.


You try paying for something which is £10 with 20 pence pieces, tried once and they wouldn't accept it, they basilcly turned down my money. They thought I was taking the Mick, well I wasn't I had just saved them up. At the end of the day is up to whatever business do accept or decline what they want, as if it's to much hassle why bother? Like these coins, all the different ones, must be a pain knowing what is "legal tender" and fakes.

Edited by: "matthew_legend" 25th Feb 2016
tinca

​I am!


I think we all hate it when some one claims to speak for us.
matthew_legend

You try paying for something which is £10 with 20 pence pieces, tried … You try paying for something which is £10 with 20 pence pieces, tried once and they wouldn't accept it



I believe the law says you can use up to the amounts specified to settle a debt, so if I owe you £10 I can offer to pay you 50x 20p pieces and if you refuse I can legally say the debt is nullified as you have refused payment.

On the other hand if you offer to tender (purchase) an item then the seller is completely at liberty to refuse to sell to you for any reason including because they don't like low denomination coins.
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