Nikon AF-S 50mm f1.8 g - Best Buy - £163.99 del
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Nikon AF-S 50mm f1.8 g - Best Buy - £163.99 del

14
Found 28th Nov 2011
Use code BBY to get at this price. A great lens for any starter Nikon dslr user at a great price.

Cheapest on web now.

14 Comments

unsure to ge this or a 35mm i like to take pics of my kids and some photos outdoors general photos!! hmm help

I had been using a Nikon 1.8 50mm but talked to someone that uses the 35mm. She said that the much wider field made up in spades for the distance reduction from the 50mm.

I bought the lens and fully agree. The lens from my perspective is at least equal if not better in capabilities than the 50mm. The gain is a much wider field that the 50mm gives up. I have not done any clinical comparisons but I'm sold on this little gem.

WindwoodTrader

photo.net/equ…724
Edited by: "shortchanged" 28th Nov 2011

Original Poster

As a portrait lens this is perfect. Will work out door too. If you have a kit lens 18-55mm check which you prefer. I got this lens for street photography, portraits and landscape.

If you are edging toward landscape more then a wider angle may suit your preference a little better.
If more portraits then this is the lens for you.

If you're using a DX Nikon, i.e. virtually all of their DSLR's, then I would definately recommend the 35mm rather than 50mm for general use and kids photos.

I used to have the old AF50mm on my D80 and it was great while my daughter was baby, I could take non flash shots indoors. As soon as she was moving and growing I found the 50mm to be too long, I could never fit her all in while indoors. I changed to the 35mm prime and its been great, much more suited to general use.

good price for this one but for everyday use 35mm is better ( in my oppinion)

50mm is more useful in studios

great thanks all I had the d50 with the 18-70mm what a lens that was!! i miss it so now got the d90 with the 18-200 and 17-50 tamron wanting that extra crispness and blur shoudl the 35mm do the job hmm this 50mm is good for the price but taking more wider angles than the 50mm i think like small groups or backgrounds with child in foreground.

sorry but which 35mm 1.8G?
Edited by: "alfie786" 28th Nov 2011

Original Poster

You'll always get better Bokeh off of a longer focal length so that's why I would always go for 50mm over 35mm for portraits whether it's dx or fx. You also get less sensor distortion on close up images at 50mm. If you think you'll be too close take a step back that is equivalent to the 15mm difference. But in an ideal world you'd have both lens as they are equally wicked!

Original Poster

The cheap 35mm f1.8 around £165 is perfectly good for any dx camera you can use it with an fx body but you'll get some vignetting.

Edit

Just been thinking which is dangerous. As the 35mm is a dx lens does that mean the true focal length is around 28mm giving a true 35mm or is it actually 50mm as the 50mm non dx lens equates to around 70mm
Edited by: "karpy" 28th Nov 2011

OOS now.

karpy

You'll always get better Bokeh off of a longer focal length



You are conflating bokeh and depth of field, the two are not the same.

Bokeh is dependent on the specifics of the optical formula of a lens. It does not depend on focal length.
Depth of field is dependent on focal length and aperture. It does not depend on the optical formula.

karpy

You also get less sensor distortion on close up images at 50mm.


Do you perhaps mean perspective distortion?

karpy

If you think you'll be too close take a step back that is equivalent to … If you think you'll be too close take a step back that is equivalent to the 15mm difference.


Sure, that will net you the same field of view, but it will change the perspective.

The 35mm DX lens gives a field of view approximately the same as a 50mm on full frame. The 50mm on DX equates to about 85mm or so on full frame.

karpy

Just been thinking which is dangerous. As the 35mm is a dx lens does that … Just been thinking which is dangerous. As the 35mm is a dx lens does that mean the true focal length is around 28mm giving a true 35mm or is it actually 50mm as the 50mm non dx lens equates to around 70mm



No. A 35mm lens is a 35mm lens is a 35mm lens. Changing the size (or shape) of the bit of film (or sensor;-) behind the lens can in no way change the focal length of the lens, nor any other optical property of the lens. Or to put it another way, a 35mm focal length lens will bring light from infinity to focus 35mm behind the lens. Remember it will do this even if there is no film/sensor behind the lens at all.

What you seem to be thinking of is field of view, which is dependent on _both_ focal length and sensor size. Usually expressed as the angle corner to corner across the diagonal of the frame 2*arctan( focal length / half the frame diagonal ).

Thus a 35mm lens on a DX sensor has the same field of view as a 50mm lens on an FX sensor. Likewise 50mm on DX & 75mm on FX.

Note that the DX or FX designation of a lens refers to it's designed image circle and whether that image circle is large enough to cover the frame.

out of stock - and I guess we can assume they're not getting more...

how about the sigma 10-20mm is that a good deal with discount £449
Edited by moderator: "* accidental swear filter breach, amended" 30th Nov 2011
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