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Nissan Leaf Hatchback 110kW Acenta 40kWh 5dr Auto [6.6kw Charger] £253.06 per month / £6073.50 total at What Car? Leasing
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Nissan Leaf Hatchback 110kW Acenta 40kWh 5dr Auto [6.6kw Charger] £253.06 per month / £6073.50 total at What Car? Leasing

£6,073.50£6,454.726%What Car? Leasing Deals
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Posted 2nd Feb

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

I was looking at the Willow Leasing deal, but then stumbled across this one.
My first post. Can't tell if it includes anything else..

Nissan Leaf Hatchback 110kW Acenta 40kWh 5dr Auto [6.6kw Charger]
£202.45* (Inc VAT)
24 months
£1,214.70* (Inc VAT)
8,000 mpa
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I've run the numbers for another post so copying here for info.

In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):

40 kWh battery and 168 mile range means it should do 4.2 miles per kWh.

Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1.2p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1200 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.

Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 3.1p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.
Maverick7702/02/2020 19:36

I really love the idea of an electric car, better on the environment etc …I really love the idea of an electric car, better on the environment etc however with only 8000 miles per year at the price they currently command I don't feel that it's worth it financially, at least for me. When I can get one for the above prive with 15k I think I'll definitely be on board (pun intended)


Th weird contradiction in your desire is that if you were to take a deal like this, and use the average 8ppm extra charge, you'd pay £560 for the 7,000 miles per year, but save ~£700 on the fuel costs of the equivalent fossil fuel car for the same 7,000 miles.

Just something to think about
54 Comments
Smart Leasing Solitions cheaper?
Willow leasing was for the n connecta model so depends on what you are after.
techsearchuk02/02/2020 18:23

Willow leasing was for the n connecta model so depends on what you are …Willow leasing was for the n connecta model so depends on what you are after.


What is difference with n connecta
In Addition to Acenta:
Intelligent Around View Monitor with Moving Object Detection and Front and Rear Parking Sensors**
Part Synthetic Leather/Part Cloth Trim***
Heat Pack, including Heated Seats and Heated Steering Wheel
17" Alloy Wheels
Privacy Glass
I've run the numbers for another post so copying here for info.

In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):

40 kWh battery and 168 mile range means it should do 4.2 miles per kWh.

Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1.2p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1200 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.

Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 3.1p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.
I really love the idea of an electric car, better on the environment etc however with only 8000 miles per year at the price they currently command I don't feel that it's worth it financially, at least for me. When I can get one for the above prive with 15k I think I'll definitely be on board (pun intended)
Edited by: "Maverick77" 2nd Feb
Maverick7702/02/2020 19:36

I really love the idea of an electric car, better on the environment etc …I really love the idea of an electric car, better on the environment etc however with only 8000 miles per year at the price they currently command I don't feel that it's worth it financially, at least for me. When I can get one for the above prive with 15k I think I'll definitely be on board (pun intended)


Th weird contradiction in your desire is that if you were to take a deal like this, and use the average 8ppm extra charge, you'd pay £560 for the 7,000 miles per year, but save ~£700 on the fuel costs of the equivalent fossil fuel car for the same 7,000 miles.

Just something to think about
Uncommon.Sense02/02/2020 20:27

Th weird contradiction in your desire is that if you were to take a deal …Th weird contradiction in your desire is that if you were to take a deal like this, and use the average 8ppm extra charge, you'd pay £560 for the 7,000 miles per year, but save ~£700 on the fuel costs of the equivalent fossil fuel car for the same 7,000 miles. Just something to think about


Tbh I didn't look at how much it would be extra per mile. You're tempting me now....
Maverick7702/02/2020 20:34

Tbh I didn't look at how much it would be extra per mile. You're tempting …Tbh I didn't look at how much it would be extra per mile. You're tempting me now....


30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.25
30,000 miles at 3mpkWh and £0.12pkWh is £1,200

Fuel saving is £3,056.25, and the total cost of the lease with the extra mileage included would be ~ £7,200, minus the saved fuel costs is £4,137.25 or £172.38.
If you drove efficiently and bought cheaper electricity you could be saving even more, at 4mpkWh and an average of 7ppkWh of electricity you'd spend £525 for 30,000 miles, or ~£146.50 per month.

That is all based on fuel savings, not the headline price here, so if you are running a very efficient car now and do a lot of 55 MPH driving with very little city driving or traffic then we'd need to look at the fuel costs again. I've also assumed Petrol prices woun't go up for 2 years.
Electric vehicles don't do what they say similar to petrol/ diesels. Some of these figures are very optimistic. The battery will slowly get less efficient over time and the cost of these cars at the minute is roughly double an ice car. I would love to have an electric but I feel it's a big gamble. I know an electric car owner who won't let his wife put the heating on due to the loss in range .
golfie02/02/2020 20:57

Electric vehicles don't do what they say similar to petrol/ diesels. Some …Electric vehicles don't do what they say similar to petrol/ diesels. Some of these figures are very optimistic. The battery will slowly get less efficient over time and the cost of these cars at the minute is roughly double an ice car. I would love to have an electric but I feel it's a big gamble. I know an electric car owner who won't let his wife put the heating on due to the loss in range .


In 100k miles you lose around 7% of battery capacity. Does it matter if it's a lease car?Not really. Batterry won't get less efficient just by itself, it depends on charge/discharge cycles. What you will notice is less range due to cold weather. As car will use some of the energy to keep your battery warm.
Hmmmm not much likelihood of me going electric anytime soon. My nearest charging point is 7 miles away, and although I work for a major car manufacturer there are no charging points available to employees. Do I live in the middle of nowhere? Nope the SE of England, with parking away from houses...so a long time for this to become popular nationwide I think. Maybe hybrid, but almost certainly never full electric.
Uncommon.Sense02/02/2020 20:40

30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3 …30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3mpkWh and £0.12pkWh is £1,200Fuel saving is £3,056.25, and the total cost of the lease with the extra mileage included would be ~ £7,200, minus the saved fuel costs is £4,137.25 or £172.38. If you drove efficiently and bought cheaper electricity you could be saving even more, at 4mpkWh and an average of 7ppkWh of electricity you'd spend £525 for 30,000 miles, or ~£146.50 per month.That is all based on fuel savings, not the headline price here, so if you are running a very efficient car now and do a lot of 55 MPH driving with very little city driving or traffic then we'd need to look at the fuel costs again. I've also assumed Petrol prices woun't go up for 2 years.


I think I'm going to have to look into this in more detail mate. Thanks for the info.
Uncommon.Sense02/02/2020 20:40

30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3 …30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3mpkWh and £0.12pkWh is £1,200Fuel saving is £3,056.25, and the total cost of the lease with the extra mileage included would be ~ £7,200, minus the saved fuel costs is £4,137.25 or £172.38. If you drove efficiently and bought cheaper electricity you could be saving even more, at 4mpkWh and an average of 7ppkWh of electricity you'd spend £525 for 30,000 miles, or ~£146.50 per month.That is all based on fuel savings, not the headline price here, so if you are running a very efficient car now and do a lot of 55 MPH driving with very little city driving or traffic then we'd need to look at the fuel costs again. I've also assumed Petrol prices woun't go up for 2 years.

It does seem a massive saving to convert to electric, even more so for those averaging 30mpg (like me).

I do wonder about the timescale involved until these benefits reduce. As people convert and the taxes received from petrol/diesel reduce how will electric cars be taxed to compensate this? :/
Uns02/02/2020 19:35

I've run the numbers for another post so copying here for info. In terms …I've run the numbers for another post so copying here for info. In terms of cost to run (as compared with petrol/diesel which cost around 13.5p per mile according to gov.uk figures):40 kWh battery and 168 mile range means it should do 4.2 miles per kWh.Charging off-peak with an Octopus Go tariff of 5p per kWh should cost of approximately 1.2p (£0.01) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1200 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel. Alternatively, charging with a standard tariff of 13p per kWh should cost approximate 3.1p (£0.03) per mile. This means you should save approximately £1000 per 10,000 miles, compared to the average petrol/diesel.


Why 4.2 miles per kWh? I wouldn't call that typical for average annual UK battery-to-wheel efficiency in a Leaf, let alone meter-to-wheel efficiency (i.e. what you actually pay for). The Nissan website even gives the range at "up to 168 miles", which suggests 4.2 miles per kWh is a "best case" rather than a typical one.

More likely, the annual average will fall in between 3.5MpkWh and 4MpkWh, which then falls to 3.15-3.6MpkWh when accounting for losses between the meter and the battery. Though What Car did accidentally measure this efficiency when they messed up their "Real Range" testing methodology. They recorded a meter-to-wheel efficiency of 2.8 miles per kWh for this car (and then mistakenly extrapolated this to find the range, e.g. a 40kWh Leaf has a range of 40 × 2.8 = 112 miles range... oops).

So electricity costs per mile are likely to be in the range of 1.39p to 1.79p on Octopus Go's* night rate, or 4p to 5.14p at the UK average kWh price.

December's average petrol price was £5.70 per gallon, while diesel was £5.89. So a Leaf would save 9.11p to 12.86p per mile vs a 40MPG petrol, or 4.68p to 8.43p per mile vs a 60MPG diesel. That translates to a saving of anywhere between £374 and £1,029 over 8,000 miles.



*Octopus Go has quite a high standing charge. So the savings don't tend to be quite as large as the attractive kWh rate suggests. Though the effect this actually has on per mile costs at 8,000 miles per year is negligible; fractions of a penny per mile.
Edited by: "satchef1" 3rd Feb
Bring on the charging point rage when these get more popular,14 charging points in my town of 55,000.
Uncommon.Sense02/02/2020 20:40

30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3 …30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3mpkWh and £0.12pkWh is £1,200Fuel saving is £3,056.25, and the total cost of the lease with the extra mileage included would be ~ £7,200, minus the saved fuel costs is £4,137.25 or £172.38. If you drove efficiently and bought cheaper electricity you could be saving even more, at 4mpkWh and an average of 7ppkWh of electricity you'd spend £525 for 30,000 miles, or ~£146.50 per month.That is all based on fuel savings, not the headline price here, so if you are running a very efficient car now and do a lot of 55 MPH driving with very little city driving or traffic then we'd need to look at the fuel costs again. I've also assumed Petrol prices woun't go up for 2 years.


it even.cheaper than.that. I have Octopus Go tariff and charge my Leaf during the 4 hours of cheap rate electricity.. It's just 5p per kw. From my home charger I can get approximately 28wks in those 4 hrs. That's enough power for approx 100 miles

So 100 miles a day will cost me £1.40

Even better. When you switch to Octopus using a referral code from an existing customer you get a £50 credit out into your account. That would pay for 1000kws at the cheaper rate. Enough power to drive approx 4000 miles

In your.first year of your lease mileage you get 4000 miles paid for from the introduction credit and would pay £50 for the other 4000 miles So your total fuel bill for your first year would only be £50. Yes just £50 to.drive 8000 miles
Remember you must have the introduction code to enter at the time of applying for the switch.

This makes this Leaf deal even better
Edited by: "qprfanbideford" 3rd Feb
Uncommon.Sense02/02/2020 20:40

30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3 …30,000 miles at 40 MPG, and £1.25 per litre is £4,256.2530,000 miles at 3mpkWh and £0.12pkWh is £1,200 That is all based on fuel savings, not the headline price here, so if you are running a very efficient car now and do a lot of 55 MPH driving with very little city driving or traffic then we'd need to look at the fuel costs again.


I've an "Evil" diesel, Its a 10 year old Fiesta Ecotec, that does 55 to 60 MPG in day to day use (rising to towards 65 on motorway runs) and I do about 15k a year in miles (currently a 40 mile commute each day). Diesel for me is usually about £1.25 a litre, so taking the average of £5.89 noted above for diesel thats around £3200 in fuel, so around a £2k saving assuming 55MPG

Much as I'd like to go electric the lack of charging facilities near my parents and inlaws means I'd be forced to use their electrity, (not a problem but I'd feel bad about it), the range means we can't get to any of the parents without planning at least one charging break, and the money side does not add up.

The Goverments financial incentives to go electric just aren't enough to make it cost neutral (I know its greener, but it still has to be paid for somehow), and goverment pressure to improve the charging infrastructure does not seem to be there, especially in town centres (there NO charge points in my town centre at all, with only two by the railway station and two in a retail park for a town with a population of 90K to 100K) so unless I have to replace the fiesta due to old age I can't see me going electric any time soon.
gavin103/02/2020 07:47

I've an "Evil" diesel, Its a 10 year old Fiesta Ecotec, that does 55 to 60 …I've an "Evil" diesel, Its a 10 year old Fiesta Ecotec, that does 55 to 60 MPG in day to day use (rising to towards 65 on motorway runs) and I do about 15k a year in miles (currently a 40 mile commute each day). Diesel for me is usually about £1.25 a litre, so taking the average of £5.89 noted above for diesel thats around £3200 in fuel, so around a £2k saving assuming 55MPGMuch as I'd like to go electric the lack of charging facilities near my parents and inlaws means I'd be forced to use their electrity, (not a problem but I'd feel bad about it), the range means we can't get to any of the parents without planning at least one charging break, and the money side does not add up. The Goverments financial incentives to go electric just aren't enough to make it cost neutral (I know its greener, but it still has to be paid for somehow), and goverment pressure to improve the charging infrastructure does not seem to be there, especially in town centres (there NO charge points in my town centre at all, with only two by the railway station and two in a retail park for a town with a population of 90K to 100K) so unless I have to replace the fiesta due to old age I can't see me going electric any time soon.


Obviously it doesn't work for everyone, and keeping a 10 year old car running for as long as you can makes more sense until it throws up a massive bill or just falls apart from old age in another decade or so. Or maybe when they decide to price you out of the market and fuel prices start rising like tobacco products.

As for your away from home charging, you can pay people for the electricity you use you know? It's not like they have a limited supply of it to last them a week or a month.

Cost will always most peoples primary motivator, except when they are spending on something they enjoy doing for pleasure or as a hobby, and no one likes sitting in a car in a traffic jam (I hope). The non-home charging infrastructure is improving every day, but obviously most miles driven for most people will be supplied by at home chargers, sadly that doesn't help those that chose to live in a high rise flat, or living in a street of terraced housing. Ironically I think home charging will become a bit like having great broadband at your address, and as the years pass people will be looking at on-site and off-site parking/charging much more seriously than the do presently.

Which is your town centre, I want to see the lack of chargers on Zap Map, then I can recommend some installs to Polar, Shell, Instavolt etc.
trannyboy03/02/2020 01:05

Bring on the charging point rage when these get more popular,14 charging …Bring on the charging point rage when these get more popular,14 charging points in my town of 55,000.


No one got a driveway in your town?
Ega_Hacass02/02/2020 21:08

In 100k miles you lose around 7% of battery capacity. Does it matter if …In 100k miles you lose around 7% of battery capacity. Does it matter if it's a lease car?Not really. Batterry won't get less efficient just by itself, it depends on charge/discharge cycles. What you will notice is less range due to cold weather. As car will use some of the energy to keep your battery warm.


Where did you get the 7% figure from. Highly unrealistic.
golfie02/02/2020 20:57

Electric vehicles don't do what they say similar to petrol/ diesels. Some …Electric vehicles don't do what they say similar to petrol/ diesels. Some of these figures are very optimistic. The battery will slowly get less efficient over time and the cost of these cars at the minute is roughly double an ice car. I would love to have an electric but I feel it's a big gamble. I know an electric car owner who won't let his wife put the heating on due to the loss in range .


Yes there are some electric cars drivers who do drive without the heating. I guess if the range is more important than feeling comfortable.
Ive been looking into electric cars for a few months now. My family have 2 Teslas. I drive a LPG Lexus, does 150 miles local on £35 LPG. I can get that same amount of mileage in the Leaf for approx £5. Thats a big saving weekly. Majority of my driving is all local. Electric cars are definitely more suited to those driving shorter distances.
satchef102/02/2020 23:40

Why 4.2 miles per kWh? I wouldn't call that typical for average annual UK …Why 4.2 miles per kWh? I wouldn't call that typical for average annual UK battery-to-wheel efficiency in a Leaf, let alone meter-to-wheel efficiency (i.e. what you actually pay for). The Nissan website even gives the range at "up to 168 miles", which suggests 4.2 miles per kWh is a "best case" rather than a typical one. More likely, the annual average will fall in between 3.5MpkWh and 4MpkWh, which then falls to 3.15-3.6MpkWh when accounting for losses between the meter and the battery. Though What Car did accidentally measure this efficiency when they messed up their "Real Range" testing methodology. They recorded a meter-to-wheel efficiency of 2.8 miles per kWh for this car (and then mistakenly extrapolated this to find the range, e.g. a 40kWh Leaf has a range of 40 × 2.8 = 112 miles range... oops). So electricity costs per mile are likely to be in the range of 1.39p to 1.79p on Octopus Go's* night rate, or 4p to 5.14p at the UK average kWh price.December's average petrol price was £5.70 per gallon, while diesel was £5.89. So a Leaf would save 9.11p to 12.86p per mile vs a 40MPG petrol, or 4.68p to 8.43p per mile vs a 60MPG diesel. That translates to a saving of anywhere between £374 and £1,029 over 8,000 miles.*Octopus Go has quite a high standing charge. So the savings don't tend to be quite as large as the attractive kWh rate suggests. Though the effect this actually has on per mile costs at 8,000 miles per year is negligible; fractions of a penny per mile.



The figures I worked out, using real world MPG and electric range (vs manufacturer claims) and using representative fuel and charging costs, was about £650 EV saving per 10k miles, which is similar to the costs above.
Uncommon.Sense03/02/2020 08:01

Which is your town centre, I want to see the lack of chargers on Zap Map, …Which is your town centre, I want to see the lack of chargers on Zap Map, then I can recommend some installs to Polar, Shell, Instavolt etc.


To be fair, there are a lot of town centres that are really badly served. Shropshire is a particular highlight round my way. Fairly sizeable towns with one 7kW charger site. Some without even that. And only Shrewsbury, Oswestry and Wrexham have rapids.
satchef103/02/2020 10:55

To be fair, there are a lot of town centres that are really badly served. …To be fair, there are a lot of town centres that are really badly served. Shropshire is a particular highlight round my way. Fairly sizeable towns with one 7kW charger site. Some without even that. And only Shrewsbury, Oswestry and Wrexham have rapids.


How many of the providers have you written to or called? It's worth doing especially the lower cost 7kW ones since the install cost it so low. I've had some decent feed back so far.
Always been a mathematical struggle to know whether doing this is lowest cost of commuting
golfie02/02/2020 20:57

Electric vehicles don't do what they say similar to petrol/ diesels. Some …Electric vehicles don't do what they say similar to petrol/ diesels. Some of these figures are very optimistic. The battery will slowly get less efficient over time and the cost of these cars at the minute is roughly double an ice car. I would love to have an electric but I feel it's a big gamble. I know an electric car owner who won't let his wife put the heating on due to the loss in range .



Leasing mitigates that risk. The battery in the Leaf is notorious for losing state of charge over time due to issues with battery temperature management; as such I would never own one, but leasing at this price is a sound option.
azcn250303/02/2020 14:01

Leasing mitigates that risk. The battery in the Leaf is notorious for …Leasing mitigates that risk. The battery in the Leaf is notorious for losing state of charge over time due to issues with battery temperature management; as such I would never own one, but leasing at this price is a sound option.


Yes in a hot climate but not as much in the UK. However due to lack of temperature management the GOM is very inaccurate
Uncommon.Sense03/02/2020 08:01

.Which is your town centre, I want to see the lack of chargers on Zap Map, ….Which is your town centre, I want to see the lack of chargers on Zap Map, then I can recommend some installs to Polar, Shell, Instavolt etc.



Take your pick most of the towns around me Harlow, Epping, Ware, Hertford or Bishops Stortford , broxbourne or Cheshire

Leaving out the ones in dealers that may not be open to all these one or two sites in each town meaning if you get there and the units not working you’ll likely to be annoyed to say the least..
gavin103/02/2020 19:51

Take your pick most of the towns around me Harlow, Epping, Ware, Hertford …Take your pick most of the towns around me Harlow, Epping, Ware, Hertford or Bishops Stortford , broxbourne or Cheshire Leaving out the ones in dealers that may not be open to all these one or two sites in each town meaning if you get there and the units not working you’ll likely to be annoyed to say the least..


I see the problem, everyone round those areas owns Range Rovers so there is no need for chargers.

I'll send a few mails to a few charging companies and point this failure out, the lack of rapids is weird, but not a much as the complete dearth of 7kW jobbies.
An lot of people are without driveways myself included, I live in a terraced street and my nearest on street charging point has a three hour limit if I read the sign correctly, another is in an Aldi carpark with a 2 hour parking restriction controlled by cameras. All the flat and maisonette dwellers may have allocated parking but as yet have no access to charging,for those who can park on their drives with suitable access for a charging cable and associated costs if you have a higher power connection installed then yes it's all good, perhaps the way ahead is to have all the lamp posts wired up and someone could write an app so those with empty driveways could offer charging facilities to those that need it. As for all those people who were sold the idea of saving money by having a smart meter see what happens to your bills when tiered rate charging comes in, cooking between 7-9am or 5-7pm , charging a car overnight will be more expensive than during the day as they know you want it ready for the morning.
Edited by: "trannyboy" 3rd Feb
Uncommon.Sense03/02/2020 19:56

I see the problem, everyone round those areas owns Range Rovers so there …I see the problem, everyone round those areas owns Range Rovers so there is no need for chargers. I'll send a few mails to a few charging companies and point this failure out, the lack of rapids is weird, but not a much as the complete dearth of 7kW jobbies.


Hmm Ware and Hertford maybe..

You can see the problem, not enough chargers and if ones caput or vandalised the drivers stuffed

My in-laws have split up and live in Lymington and Bere Alston, only one charger in Lymington, and that’s a single charger not one site, Nearest public charter to Bere Alston is 6 miles but there are a few b&b closer by a mile or so that may sell a charge, although to be fair Bere Alston is in the middle of nowhere
My mum lives near Barnsley and that’s slight better but there’s not enough points if electric was to suddenly be popular there’s only two chargers for the city centre as the third dealership one may be restricted and that’s not enough for a town with a quarter of a million of population.
Any idea what is the lease cost for 20/25k miles p/a?
My struggle is I currently have a PHEV and 90% of my miles are EV so the cost benefit is even harder to justify.

I suppose in a good way it means I can hold out for a few years and see where the EV market goes.

Like someone else said, likely by then the gov are taking EVs per mile to ensure they don't lose tax revenues
gavin103/02/2020 22:33

Hmm Ware and Hertford maybe.. You can see the problem, not enough …Hmm Ware and Hertford maybe.. You can see the problem, not enough chargers and if ones caput or vandalised the drivers stuffed My in-laws have split up and live in Lymington and Bere Alston, only one charger in Lymington, and that’s a single charger not one site, Nearest public charter to Bere Alston is 6 miles but there are a few b&b closer by a mile or so that may sell a charge, although to be fair Bere Alston is in the middle of nowhere My mum lives near Barnsley and that’s slight better but there’s not enough points if electric was to suddenly be popular there’s only two chargers for the city centre as the third dealership one may be restricted and that’s not enough for a town with a quarter of a million of population.


We need to be realistic though, since uptake is gradual and not overnight and the majority of the current owners and buyers have off-street parking or a garage where they can charge.

37,850 electric vehicles joined the UK’s roads last year, up from 15,510 in 2018, where the number of charge point connectors in 2019 was 14,752 vs 29,492 as of the end of Jan '20.

It's going to be 2022-23 before the real effect takes place, when the big car manufacturers have to sort out their CO2 emissions. The expected BEV car market in the UK by the end of 2023 is predicted to be ~280k new vehicles, almost 7x what we saw in 2019, and some are predicting as many as 12x 454k! It sounds a lot but when you consider that in overall vehicles terms there were 38.9 million on UK roads at the end of September 2019, that isn't even 1.5%, and only 19% of what was sold in the UK last year.

It's going to be an interesting few years, especially as we get closer to full self driving vehicles, and ownership of a car may not be need for a huge amount of people. 2020-2030 will be very much an exciting decade in terms of personal transport and our definition of convenience and value may indeed change.
trannyboy03/02/2020 20:18

An lot of people are without driveways myself included, I live in a …An lot of people are without driveways myself included, I live in a terraced street and my nearest on street charging point has a three hour limit if I read the sign correctly, another is in an Aldi carpark with a 2 hour parking restriction controlled by cameras. All the flat and maisonette dwellers may have allocated parking but as yet have no access to charging,for those who can park on their drives with suitable access for a charging cable and associated costs if you have a higher power connection installed then yes it's all good, perhaps the way ahead is to have all the lamp posts wired up and someone could write an app so those with empty driveways could offer charging facilities to those that need it. As for all those people who were sold the idea of saving money by having a smart meter see what happens to your bills when tiered rate charging comes in, cooking between 7-9am or 5-7pm , charging a car overnight will be more expensive than during the day as they know you want it ready for the morning.


Lampost chargers exist and can be requested.

Overnight charging will be cheaper because electricity demand is so low. And even with mass adoption of EVs it will be compared to a family using a home at peak times.

It's about the actual demand on the grid, not what you're suggesting.

People are being far too negative and imaging negative scenarios without thinking of the benefits

Charging a car is far more pleasant and healthier and safer than filling up at a petrol station. For long drips go to a service station, plug in, use the facilities and grab a coffee or something and by the time you're done you're good to carry on.

You can even get a charge point installed at a family member's home.

And request on street charging

Running a Diesel into the ground ignores the cancerous noxious fumes. And makes a drive to London very expensive. Bristol will be out soon too (9am to 3pm or so) and expect other cities to follow suit.

EVs are excellent for towing too. Ridiculously torquey - almost instant torque response with no curve - it's just constant. Quieter and smoother ride, especially for city driving - no chugging Diesel engine.

If your leasing then EVs make loads of sense - they're not more expensive.

As for EVs supposedly costing twice as much they don't at all like for like.

Look at the price of the Kia Nero and Kia Nero EV for the same equipment level.

So much FUD and BS. Plenty of helpful comments too though and understandable concerns.
It's all getting better and range anxiety, range "need" and charging really aren't the issue people think they are at first most of the time
It is not the same as having an ICE vehicle. A trip is different, but much better overall!
Edited by: "Shinoke" 4th Feb
Is this price also valid as a business / company lease?
If not, can someone recommend a good website/site to find deals?

Thanks in advance
I’m finishing 3 years lease (2 years and later extended for another year) with drive electric (good place to start shopping for a deal).
This was the best decision made ever to get Kia Soul ev as a company car to drive in London (99% of my trips are within m25).
Saves the city air, the drive is super pleasure without petrol/Diesel engine noises, I actually rest in my car and I spend in it good 4 hours a day.
I’m not hippie about it as I am a bit petrolhead myself with a second car being 256HP Subaru which I take on longer trips.
Imagine how our cities would be with let’s say 70% vehicles being ev?? Let’s be honest with our selves this 70% almost never leaves city borders.

My lease ends in July so I’m looking for a new car and Nissan Leaf is on the top of my list. I pay now £169+vat for Kia but it looks I’ll never get similar price this days.
Thanks OP.
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